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The way the west was won


the way the west was won

Warner Home Video has released How the West Was Won as an ultimate edition 3 DVD set. It's an outstanding achievement in every way. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for How the West Was Won (DVD, 2007) at the best online prices at eBay! Download how the west was won (1962) Yify Movie Torrent: Setting off on a journey to the west in the 1830s, the Prescott family run into a man named Linus.

: The way the west was won

The way the west was won
The way the west was won
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The way the west was won -

"How the West Was Won"
Re-issued on DVD in all its “Cinerama®” Glory

Read more at
in70mm.com
The 70mm Newsletter
Written by: Warner press releaseDate: Burbank, Calif. April 28, 2008
"How the West Was Won" the spectacular cinematic epic is restored to all its “Cinerama®” glory with three bonus-filled editions: ultimate collectors, two disc-special & blu-ray™ hi-def!

The wondrous western historical saga "How the West Was Won" gallops onto home theatre screens August 26th in three new restored and remastered editions. One of only two narrative feature films produced in the original Cinerama® three-panel widescreen process, "How the West Was Won" is a stunning epic, following four generations of a courageous New England farm family as they travel to the fertile Ohio Valley during America’s early westward expansion.

M-G-M and Cinerama®, Inc. spared no expense to give this sprawling Western saga the huge vistas made possible with the original Cinerama® process. After its initial theatrical engagements in theaters equipped with three synchronized projectors for Cinerama® presentation, the film was subsequently presented on traditional theater screens with the three separate Cinerama® panels being optically joined to form a standard 35mm 2.35:1 widescreen image, leaving most subsequent viewers puzzled by the annoying ‘join lines.’

Following several years of careful development, the technicians at Warner Bros. Motion Picture Imaging perfected a technology that could finally eliminate the ‘join lines,’ and unify the images into a superb viewing experience that captures the essence of the production’s initial road show exhibitions, with an aspect ratio of 2.89:1.
 
More in 70mm reading:

"How the West Was Won"

"Cinerama Adventure"

David Strohmaier

Internet link:

 
This ultimate western film gets the Ultimate treatment with "How the West Was Won" Ultimate Collector’s Edition ($59.92 SRP). The two disc Standard Definition Ultimate Collector’s Edition is loaded with collectible memorabilia including a 20-page theatrical press book reproduction, 10 behind-the-scenes photo cards and 10 postcards, and an exclusive movie poster offer. Streeting simultaneously will also be a glorious Blu-ray™ Hi-Def ($34.99 SRP) version. Exclusive to Blu-ray is the “SmileBox” version of the film which presents the image with a unique curvature that virtually recreates the true Cinerama® experience in a home theater. This Blu-ray™ Hi-Def Edition comes with a special Digi-book packaging featuring 32-pages of rare press materials and behind-the-scenes photos. The third new edition is a Two Disc-Special Edition in standard definition ($20.97 SRP).

Some of Hollywood’s biggest stars, including John Wayne, Henry Fonda, James Stewart, Richard Widmark, Gregory Peck, Lee J. Cobb, Debbie Reynolds and Carroll Baker star in "How the West Was Won". Set between 1839 and 1889 against the backgrounds of the Louisiana Purchase, the Civil War, buffalo hunters, the Pony Express and the first transcontinental railroad, the film consists of five segments, with direction by Henry Hathaway, John Ford and George Marshall, and written by James R. Webb and John Gay, suggested by a Life Magazine series of the same name. The film was the winner of 3 Academy Awards® (Best Screenplay, Best Sound and Best Editing) as well as being nominated for an additional five Oscars®, including Best Picture. In 1997, "How the West Was Won" was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the US National Film Registry.
 
 

"How the West Was Won" Special Features:

 
Film Historian Commentary Dave Strohmaier’s critically-acclaimed, feature-length documentary "Cinerama Adventure"

The Making of "How the West Was Won" (Archival featurette)
Original Theatrical trailer

HOW THE WEST WAS WON
165 minutes - Rated G
5.1 Dolby Digital – 2.89 Widescreen

HOW THE WEST WAS WON: ULTIMATE COLLECTOR’S EDITION
Catalog #: 1000039866
$59.92 SRP

HOW THE WEST WAS WON: SPECIAL EDITION
Catalog #: 1000019114
$20.97 SRP

HOW THE WEST WAS WON: BLU-RAY™ HI-DEF
Catalog #: 1000039748
$34.99 SRP
 
About "Cinerama Adventure"

"This production is simply perfect! It blends the history of the people behind Cinerama with the story of the making of the films and highlights the technical aspects of this pioneering widescreen format in an exiting and dramatic way"

Richard Greenhalgh, 2002
 
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Updated 07-01-21
 
Источник: https://www.in70mm.com/news/2008/west/index.htm

How The West Was Won (Live)

Led Zeppelin

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70sRockMusicCDsVinylBoxed SetsDVD & Blu-ray

3 CD

4 LP

Blu-ray

Super Deluxe Boxed Set

  • Release Date: 3/23/2018
  • 3 CDs
  • Remastered
  • Release Date: 3/23/2018
  • Remastered audio
  • four 180-gram vinyl LPs
  • Release Date: 3/23/2018
  • 96kHz/24 bit 5.1 (DTS-HD Master Audio Surround)
  • stereo mixes (PCM Stereo and DTS-HD Master Audio Stereo).
  • Release Date: 3/23/2018
  • Remastered audio on three CDs and four 180-gram vinyl LPs.
  • DVD of album in Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround and PCM Stereo, plus photo gallery.
  • High-def download card of all stereo audio content at 96kHz/24 bit.
  • A book filled with rare and previously unpublished photos of the band at each of the concert locations, plus memorabilia and ephemera.
  • High-quality print of the original album cover, the first 30,000 of which will be individually numbered.

Led Zeppelin continue their reissue campaign with a new edition of their celebrated live album How The West Was Won, originally released in 2003, featuring newly remastered audio, which was done under the supervision of Jimmy Page.  HOW THE WEST WAS WON highlights the best performances from Led Zeppelin’s legendary concerts at the Los Angeles Forum and Long Beach Arena on June 25 and 27, 1972. Melded together and sequenced to replicate a single concert from beginning to end, the three-CD collection captures the band at the height of its formidable powers. Standouts include a 25-plus minute version of “Dazed And Confused” and a 21-minute medley based around “Whole Lotta Love.” The performances also capture the band introducing songs from its then-unreleased album Houses Of The Holy, which would be released nine months later.

UPC: 603497862788

Led Zeppelin continue their reissue campaign with a new edition of their celebrated live album How The West Was Won, originally released in 2003, featuring newly remastered audio, which was done under the supervision of Jimmy Page.HOW THE WEST WAS WON highlights the best performances from Led Zeppelin’s legendary concerts at the Los Angeles Forum and Long Beach Arena on June 25 and 27, 1972. Melded together and sequenced to replicate a single concert from beginning to end, the four-LP collection captures the band at the height of its formidable powers. Standouts include a 25-plus minute version of “Dazed And Confused” and a 21-minute medley based around “Whole Lotta Love.” The performances also capture the band introducing songs from its then-unreleased album Houses Of The Holy, which would be released nine months later.

UPC: 081227934156

Led Zeppelin continue their reissue campaign with a new edition of their celebrated live album How The West Was Won, originally released in 2003, featuring newly remastered audio, which was done under the supervision of Jimmy Page. HOW THE WEST WAS WON highlights the best performances from Led Zeppelin’s legendary concerts at the Los Angeles Forum and Long Beach Arena on June 25 and 27, 1972.  First ever Blu-ray Audio edition (containing hi-res 5.1 surround sound).

UPC: 603497861033

Led Zeppelin continue their reissue campaign with a new edition of their celebrated live album How The West Was Won, originally released in 2003, featuring newly remastered audio, which was done under the supervision of Jimmy Page.HOW THE WEST WAS WON highlights the best performances from Led Zeppelin’s legendary concerts at the Los Angeles Forum and Long Beach Arena on June 25 and 27, 1972. Melded together and sequenced to replicate a single concert from beginning to end, it captures the band at the height of its formidable powers. Standouts include a 25-plus minute version of “Dazed And Confused” and a 21-minute medley based around “Whole Lotta Love.” The performances also capture the band introducing songs from its then-unreleased album Houses Of The Holy, which would be released nine months later.  

Super Deluxe Boxed Set includes: Remastered audio on three CDs and four 180-gram vinyl LPs; DVD of album in Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround and PCM Stereo, plus photo gallery; High-def download card of all stereo audio content at 96kHz/24 bit; A book filled with rare and previously unpublished photos of the band at each of the concert locations, plus memorabilia and ephemera; High-quality print of the original album cover, the first 30,000 of which will be individually numbered.

UPC: 603497862177

 

Disc 1

1

LA Drone (Live) [Remastered]

0.14

2

Immigrant Song (Live) [Remastered]

3.42

3

Heartbreaker (Live) [Remastered]

7.25

4

Black Dog (Live) [Remastered]

5.41

5

Over The Hills And Far Away (Live) [Remastered]

5.08

6

Since I've Been Loving You (Live) [Remastered]

8.02

7

Stairway To Heaven (Live) [Remastered]

9.38

8

Going to California (Live) [Remastered]

5.37

9

That's The Way (Live) [Remastered]

5.54

10

Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp (Live) [Remastered]

4.55

Disc 2

1

Dazed And Confused (Live) [Remastered]

25.25

2

What Is And What Should Never Be (Live) [Remastered]

4.41

3

Dancing Days (Live) [Remastered]

3.42

4

Moby Dick (Live) [Remastered]

19.20

Disc 3

1

Whole Lotta Love (Live) [Remastered]

20.59

2

Rock And Roll (Live) [Remastered]

3.56

3

The Ocean (Live) [Remastered]

4.21

4

Bring It On Home (Live) [Remastered]

9.30

Side A

1

LA Drone (Live) [Remastered]

0.14

2

Immigrant Song (Live) [Remastered]

3.42

3

Heartbreaker (Live) [Remastered]

7.24

4

Black Dog (Live) [Remastered]

5.35

Side B

1

Over The Hills And Far Away

5.12

2

What Is And What Should Never Be (Live) [Remastered]

4.33

3

Dancing Days (Live) [Remastered]

3.44

Side C

1

Since I've Been Loving You (Live) [Remastered]

7.59

2

Stairway To Heaven (Live) [Remastered]

9.49

Side D

1

Going To California (Live) [Remastered]

5.42

2

That's The Way (Live) [Remastered]

5.24

3

Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp (Live) [Remastered]

4.42

Side E

1

Dazed And Confused (Live) [Remastered]

25.33

Side F

1

Moby Dick (Live) [Remastered]

19.11

Side G

1

Whole Lotta Love (Live) [Remastered]

20.59

Side H

1

Rock And Roll (Live) [Remastered]

3.55

2

The Ocean (Live) [Remastered]

4.26

3

Bring It On Home (Live) [Remastered]

9.25

Disc 1

1

LA Drone (Live) [Remastered]

0.14

2

Immigrant Song (Live) [Remastered]

3.42

3

Heartbreaker (Live) [Remastered]

7.25

4

Black Dog (Live) [Remastered]

5.41

5

Over The Hills And Far Away (Live) [Remastered]

5.12

6

Since I've Been Loving You (Live) [Remastered]

7.59

7

Stairway To Heaven (Live) [Remastered]

9.38

8

Going to California (Live) [Remastered]

5.37

9

That's The Way (Live) [Remastered]

5.54

10

Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp (Live) [Remastered]

4.55

11

Dazed And Confused (Live) [Remastered]

25.25

12

What Is And What Should Never Be (Live) [Remastered]

4.41

13

Dancing Days (Live) [Remastered]

3.42

14

Moby Dick (Live) [Remastered]

19.20

15

Whole Lotta Love (Live) [Remastered]

20.59

16

Rock And Roll (Live) [Remastered]

3.56

17

The Ocean (Live) [Remastered]

4.21

18

Bring It On Home (Live) [Remastered]

9.39

Disc 1

1

LA Drone (Live) [Remastered]

0.14

2

Immigrant Song (Live) [Remastered]

3.42

3

Heartbreaker (Live) [Remastered]

7.25

4

Black Dog (Live) [Remastered]

5.41

5

Over The Hills And Far Away (Live) [Remastered]

5.08

6

Since I've Been Loving You (Live) [Remastered]

8.02

7

Stairway To Heaven (Live) [Remastered]

9.38

8

Going to California (Live) [Remastered]

5.37

9

That's The Way (Live) [Remastered]

5.54

10

Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp (Live) [Remastered]

4.55

Disc 2

1

Dazed And Confused (Live) [Remastered]

25.25

2

What Is And What Should Never Be (Live) [Remastered]

4.41

3

Dancing Days (Live) [Remastered]

3.42

4

Moby Dick (Live) [Remastered]

19.20

Disc 3

1

Whole Lotta Love (Live) [Remastered]

20.59

2

Rock And Roll (Live) [Remastered]

3.56

3

The Ocean (Live) [Remastered]

4.21

4

Bring It On Home (Live) [Remastered]

9.30

Disc 4

1

LA Drone (Live) [Remastered]

0.14

2

Immigrant Song (Live) [Remastered]

3.42

3

Heartbreaker (Live) [Remastered]

7.25

4

Black Dog (Live) [Remastered]

5.41

5

Over The Hills And Far Away (Live) [Remastered]

5.12

6

Since I've Been Loving You (Live) [Remastered]

7.59

7

Stairway To Heaven (Live) [Remastered]

9.38

8

Going to California (Live) [Remastered]

5.37

9

That's The Way (Live) [Remastered]

5.54

10

Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp (Live) [Remastered]

4.55

11

Dazed And Confused (Live) [Remastered]

25.25

12

What Is And What Should Never Be (Live) [Remastered]

4.41

13

Dancing Days (Live) [Remastered]

3.42

14

Moby Dick (Live) [Remastered]

19.20

15

Whole Lotta Love (Live) [Remastered]

20.59

16

Rock And Roll (Live) [Remastered]

3.56

17

The Ocean (Live) [Remastered]

4.21

18

Bring It On Home (Live) [Remastered]

9.39

Disc 5

1

LA Drone (Live) [Remastered]

0.14

2

Immigrant Song (Live) [Remastered]

3.42

3

Heartbreaker (Live) [Remastered]

7.24

4

Black Dog (Live) [Remastered]

5.35

Disc 5

1

Over The Hills And Far Away

5.12

2

What Is And What Should Never Be (Live) [Remastered]

4.33

3

Dancing Days (Live) [Remastered]

3.44

Disc 6

1

Since I've Been Loving You (Live) [Remastered]

7.59

2

Stairway To Heaven (Live) [Remastered]

9.49

Disc 6

1

Going To California (Live) [Remastered]

5.42

2

That's The Way (Live) [Remastered]

5.24

3

Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp (Live) [Remastered]

4.42

Disc 7

1

Dazed And Confused (Live) [Remastered]

25.33

Disc 7

1

Moby Dick (Live) [Remastered]

19.11

Disc 8

1

Whole Lotta Love (Live) [Remastered]

20.59

Disc 8

1

Rock And Roll (Live) [Remastered]

3.55

2

The Ocean (Live) [Remastered]

4.26

3

Bring It On Home (Live) [Remastered]

9.25

Источник: https://www.rhino.com/product/how-the-west-was-won-live

As part of my flagging recommitment to this blog, I’ve dusted off my Warner Brothers 50 Film Collection, which I purchased back in early 2014.  I fairly regularly provided reviews of the films in that collection, which I’ve gradually watched in chronological order.  That ended in 2017, when my job duties increased and my time devoted to this blog declined even further.

That’s changing.  I finally published the review of Ben-Hur I began almost two years ago, and, now, I move on to the next film in the set: How the West Was Won, from 1962.

With an Infinity-War-esque breadth of cast, How the West Was Won sets out to tell the ambitious tale of, well, how the American west was “won” from approximately 1840 until about 1890.  The portrayal of this half-century includes a series of segments divided by significant time jumps.

The film includes portions on westward migration via river and its dangers (circa 1840), westward migration across the plains (circa 1850), the Civil War (1861–65, obviously), the creation of a transcontinental railroad (late 1860s), and, finally, the last days of the Wild West outlaws (circa 1890).  Although there are new, critical characters introduced in each segment, the story is tied together loosely by following members of a single family across four generations.

I wasn’t kidding when I referenced the massive cast.  Although some of these actors only have a few minutes of screentime, the all-star players include Jimmy Stewart, John Wayne, Henry Fonda, Karl Malden, Debbie Reynolds, Lee Van Cleef, Agnes Moorehead, Gregory Peck, Eli Wallach, Lee J. Cobb, Harry Morgan, Carroll Baker, Walter Brennan, and a young Harry Dean Stanton.  Spencer Tracy narrates.

Aside from the scope of the story and the massive cast, two things about How the West Was Won jump out: the score and the cinematography.  There’s not much to say about the score aside from–it’s excellent.

The cinematography is a little more complicated.

Watching it in 1080p on blu-ray on a modern, 4k, widescreen television, the colors and vibrancy of the shots are incredible.  But there’s something unmistakably odd about the way the film is shot.  Specifically, the wide shots, while downright panoramic, appear to be a composite of multiple shots.

And that’s because they are.

It was a process called “Cinerama.”  Specifically, “three-strip” Cinerama.  It was designed to make movies look more breathtaking than ever before.  Three-strip Cinerama movies were shot on three different cameras and then projected onto a special, tripartite screen.

By all accounts, people who actually saw Cinerama films in person in the 50s and 60s attest to its beauty.  Unfortunately, that beauty doesn’t translate perfectly to a smaller screen.  Even with the abilities of modern technology, the best that Warner Brothers could do was to create a print that has lines of separation among the three shots that are fairly obvious at times.

This by no means ruins the film, and the wilderness settings are so beautiful that it’s a minor defect at most.  But it is a noticeable one.

The story behind Cinerama is so complex and intertwined with movie history itself that one of the special features on the How the West Was Won blu-ray is a documentary about the history of Cinerama—a documentary that is itself feature-length, clocking in at over 90 minutes.

The curious-looking visuals aside, the substance of the film is as scattershot as one would imagine, given its ambitious nature.  Clearly, the filmmakers wanted to tell the story of how the west came to be settled, but also felt the need to have a strong through-line.   That decision, while understandable, makes the storytelling a little more labored.

In hindsight, the movie may have worked better as an anthology film that included truly distinct stories representing each distinct aspects of western settlement that wound up being included in the finished movie.  Untethered from the somewhat contrived story of a single family, the film may have fared better from a plot standpoint.

As it is, we get a lot of half-developed characters who represent archetypes, offering only brief commentary on several different topics that each could have been their own films (and have been, many times, throughout history).

That’s not to say this is a bad movie.  It isn’t.  As I said, the score, cast, and scenery all make this one worthwhile.  Yet, it turns out to be a sampler platter rather than a solid meal, with more attention paid to presentation and ingredients than recipe.

It’s a worthwhile experience that’s probably a not as much a snapshot of ninteenth-century America as it is a snapshot of the early 1960s film industry.

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This entry was posted in Commentary, Movies, Reviews and tagged Carroll Baker, Commentary, Debbie Reynolds, George Peppard, Gregory Peck, Henry Fonda, How the West Was Won, Jimmy Stewart, John Wayne, Karl Malden, Lee J. Cobb, Movies, Reviews, Warner Bros., Warner Brothers. Bookmark the permalink.

Источник: https://theaxisofego.com/2019/12/02/untimely-movie-review-how-the-west-was-won/

Oscar-winner John Wayne, better known as “The Duke” to his fans, starred in over 165 movies throughout his career, oftentimes playing the swaggering, macho hero of westerns and war epics. But how many of his titles remain classics? Let’s take a look back at 25 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1907 as Marion Robert Morrison, Wayne worked his way up from bit player to leading man, appearing in a number of poverty row, Z-grade westerns throughout the 1930s. He shot to stardom with his role in John Ford‘s “Stagecoach” (1939), which brought new shades of nuance and artistry to the Cowboys and Indians genre. It also kicked off a lucrative, decades-long partnership between the director and star, who would make over two dozen films together, including “The Quiet Man” (1952), “The Searchers” (1956) and “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance” (1962).

Despite being one of the top box office draws for most of his career, Wayne only received two Oscar nominations as Best Actor: one for “Sands of Iwo Jima” (1949), another for “True Grit” (1969). The latter, in which he played the drunken, one-eyed Texas Ranger Rooster Cogburn, won him his long-overdue prize, as well as a Golden Globe. He also competed in Best Picture for producing “The Alamo” (1960), which he directed and starred in. He received the Cecil B. DeMille prize in 1966.

Tour our photo gallery of Wayne’s 25 greatest films, including some of the titles listed above, as well as “Red River” (1948), “She Wore a Yellow Ribbon” (1949), “Rio Bravo” (1959) and more.

– Original text and gallery published in May 2019.

Источник: https://www.goldderby.com/gallery/john-wayne-movies-25-greatest-films-ranked-worst-to-best/

THE PRODUCTION OF
"HOW THE WEST WAS WON"
(as told in the 1963 MGM-Random House souvenir book of the movie)

Filming the fully definitive story of the winning of the American West was one of the most demanding projects ever undertaken. This was never attempted before. The story encompasses fifty years in the westward expansion of the American nation-from 1839 to 1889. It includes momentous historic events of that era related to the personal stories of three generations of a typical pioneer family. Long before this heroic drama was placed before the Cinerama cameras, the project demanded and utilized the vast resources of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, the world's largest studios, and the Cinerama Corporation. Before filming, the collaboration took four directions-historical research, scientific research to refine and improve Cinerama techniques, production planning, including script writing and casting, and selection of locations for shooting. Bernard Smith received the assignment of producer, and it was he who guided the four aspects. James R. Webb, noted writer and authority on the history of America, won the assignment of writing the original screenplay. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Cinerama united to meet the challenge of filming a full-length drama in the remarkable Cinerama medium - a challenge that tested the ingenuity of artists and artisans and the full resources of both corporations. Every phase of production was geared to the remarkable capacity of the Cinerama camera to capture for the screen a motion picture with absolute reality. HOW THE WEST WAS WON concerns itself with the rich human stories of our pioneers. The search for locations for the filming was one of the most extensive ever inaugurated by a film company. Over 75 per cent of the film was filmed on locations far from the studios in Culver City, California. Each locale had to be devoid of any signs of civilization.


Director Henry Hathaway (back to camera) and Cinerama's Tom Conroy (peering through lens) plan an Erie Canal scene setup.

The entire Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer staff of location experts searched for locations which would recall the America of the 1800s. These men traveled through the historic Ohio River Valley, once a water highway to the West, and into the heart of the proud Rocky Mountains. They rode over unused paths and roads as long as four-wheeled vehicles would carry them, and by foot along trails where there were no roads. They took thousands of photographs and sent them back to the studio as often as they could get to a post office. From these efforts came eleven key locations.

Among the locations selected were the Black Hills of South Dakota, sacred land of the Sioux Indians, and home of the largest remaining herd of buffalo in the United States; the Uncompaghre National Forest in the Rockies of Colorado which has an average elevation of 11,500 feet and where there are 52 peaks towering above 14,000 feet. In addition, the area bordering the Ohio and Cumberland Rivers in Kentucky were selected, where pioneers had sailed rafts and mountain men had paddled their pelt-laden canoes. Monument Valley on the Arizona-Utah border, one of nature's spectacular wonders also was an important location.


Miss Reynolds brought safely ashore after being tossed into the ice cold Gunnison River in Colorado. Director Hathaway (back to camera) supervising the action.


Behind-the-camera view of the hazardous wagon train river crossing 11,000 feet in the Rocky Mountains.

The production brought together Hollywood's most experienced creators, craftsmen and technicians, utilizing each of thirty-eight specialized MGM departments representing 117 arts and professions and 253 skilled technical crafts. The screenplay focused on five closely related yet distinct periods - the early days of the Ohio River Valley, the covered wagon and gold rush, the Civil War, the building of the transcontinental railroad and the Southwest. With the most careful scheduling, the film could not conceivably be completed in less than ten months. If one director and cinematographer were to have carried the entire burden, it would have required years to complete the motion picture.

To solve the problem of time, three of Hollywood's most renowned directors and four veteran camera-men worked closely and combined their special talents. The directors were John Ford, Henry Hathaway and George Marshall, and the cinematographers were William Daniels, Milton Krasner, Charles Lang, Jr., and Joseph La Shelle. These men were vastly stimulated by the storytelling potential of Cinerama and they adapted themselves to this new medium. They made many contributions to the art and craft of Cinerama to provide more exciting dramatic action.

This was equally true of everyone connected with HOW THE WEST WAS WON. Hollywood's unusual interest in the picture made it possible to assemble the splendid cast starring Carroll Baker, Lee J. Cobb, Henry Fonda, Carolyn Jones, Karl Malden, Gregory Peck, George Peppard, Robert Preston, Debbie Reynolds, James Stewart, Eli Wallach, John Wayne, Richard Widmark and co-starring Brigid Bazlen, Walter Brennan, David Brian, Andy Devine, Raymond Massey, Agnes Moorehead, Henry (Harry) Morgan, Thelma Ritter, Mickey Shaughnessy and Russ Tamblyn. Spencer Tracy became the twenty-fourth star of the cast, and although he is not seen in the picture, he serves in the vital role of narrator. His rich and dramatic voice weaves together the threads of history's tapestry as the West is won.


Director John Ford rehearses a scene with Eve and Zeb.

In total, a year of meticulous preparation was spent preceding the actual start of camera work. The research alone filled 87 volumes which were cross indexed for easier reference. These included more than 10,000 photographs, paintings and sketches which became the source of authentic background information. It was a library for the directors, the set designers, the costumers, the makeup and hairdressing craftsmen. The material provided information on how the pioneer built his crude rafts, his tools and cooking equipment, and the types of weapons he and his Indian adversaries used. The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer research department purchased 195 books which were added to an already outstanding collection of early Americana.

A steady stream of color drawings and sketches came from the studio's art department. Visualizations depicting all of the action from river crossing by covered wagons to Indian battles were made. Seventyseven individual sets were designed. Sets were built higher, wider and more complete than before because the Cinerama camera magnifies each detail tremendously.


The Cinerama camera captures the grandeur of California's Sierra Nevada Mountains in epic scene.

Closeups of Debbie Reynolds, or of Gregory Peck, were filmed at two or three feet, and in pre-production tests, it was discovered that the camera glaringly revealed such minute things as machine stitching on the costumes. So, each garment had to be remade and sewn by hand in the studio's wardrobe department.

There could be no substitute for the rough, uneven homespun materials worn by the pioneers. Fifty yards of any particular fabric was the minimum order accepted by the few factories still specializing in these fabrics. A major source, oddly enough, was India, where the ancient art of handlooming has survived a mechanical age. Thousands of yards of this homespun were purchased for the costume department.

All the moccasins available in stores on Indian reservations around the nation were purchased for the production, but even these were not enough to supply the 1500 pairs used in this picture. Still more were handmade by Indian craftsmen on special order, and studio bootmakers turned out 2300 pairs of period shoes. Indian craftsmen made authentic headdresses, mostly of genuine eagle feathers and hundreds of yards of intricate beadwork.


John Wayne and Director John Ford, long time friends and co-workers, discuss a scene together.

The total number of wardrobe items ran into multiple thousands. It was the most exacting costume assignment ever attempted for a motion picture.

A few production statistics, selected at random, give a general idea of the problems faced. Bit players and extras appearing in the film totaled 12,617. There were 630 horses, 15o mules and 50 head of oxen which were tended by 203 wranglers. From reservations in South Dakota, Colorado and Utah, 350 Indians were recruited. There were 107 Conestoga and trail wagons.

Paradoxically, without modern transportation, it would have been impossible for the film crew to follow the trail of the pioneers across America. No mass movement in the history of filming on location comes close to matching HOW THE WEST WAS WON. The entire company was literally placed on wheels. It was completely self-contained, from portable dressing rooms for the stars to compact 7500 pound Leroi generators to furnish the millions of candlepower needed to light the various sets and locations.

At the height of production, the pool of studio vehicles, continually on the move over transcontinental highways for months on end, numbered 71, including 55 foot, 18 wheel semi-trailer trucks with 60,000 pound capacity, 50 foot vans, two-ton vans, four wheel drive equipment, caterpillars, buses, station wagons and passenger cars.

From the start of production on May 26, 1961, in the Ohio River Valley, with headquarters at Paducah, Kentucky, this group of vehicles accumulated almost a million miles of travel while shuttling between the studio and locations all over America.

Many of the locations selected for the film had never been photographed for a motion picture. Battery Rock in the Ohio River Valley, Courthouse Mountain, the Pinnacles and Chimney Rock in the Colorado Rockies were such areas. Locations were established in the high Sierras, the hills and plains of South Dakota and arid stretches of desert in the Southwest. To reach some of the more inaccessible locations, it was often necessary to bulldoze and maintain roads to accommodate the massive equipment needed at the sites. As the last vestiges of the Old West rapidly disappear, HOW THE WEST WAS WON recaptures both the stories and the land of the pioneers.


Henry Fonda chats with two members of the Arapahoe tribe while on location in the Black Hills of South Dakota.

The spirit of the Old West is relived in the songs it inspired. The tunes, tender and haunting, love ballads, and stirring marches which came from the hearts of the pioneers, have been woven into the score of HOW THE WEST WAS WON.

Heading a team of outstanding musical talent is Alfred Newman, an Academy Award winner five times. He won his first Oscar for "Alexander's Ragtime Band" and subsequently for "Song of Bernadette," "Mother Wore Tights," "Love Is A Many Splendored Thing" and "The King and I."

Associated with Newman are: Robert Emmett Dolan, music co-ordinator; Ken Darby, who wrote the lyrics to the film's title song, with music by Newman; and Sammy Cahn, Academy Award winner in collaboration for the song "Three Coins In The Fountain." Mr. Cahn wrote the lyrics for "Home In The Meadow," recurring theme of HOW THE WEST WAS WON.

Newman's score includes authentic songs of each historical period - the Rivers, the Plains, the Civil War, the Railroad and the Outlaws. His overture contains songs which will live as long as there is an America, among them "Shenandoah," and "Bound For the Promised Land."

In every aspect, HOW THE WEST WAS WON was a memorable project. The end result presents for the first time on a screen vast enough to capture its scope, the titanic story of the winning of the West.


PRODUCTION NOTES

It required more than two months for wranglers to corral the 2000 buffalo seen in the film's stampede scene, filmed in South Dakota.

More than 5000 pairs of period shoes and Indian moccasins were hand made to be worn by characters in HOW THE WEST WAS WON.

Thousands of yards of material had to be ordered from ancient looms in India for the special costumes. The Cinerama cameras are so critical they show up as false any attempts to substitute modern fabrics with machine stitching. So, all costumes had to be sewn by hand.

Five famous Indian tribes are represented among the Indian personnel of the film - the Brules, Oclallas and Minnecanjous of the Sioux nation, and the Arapahoes and Cheyennes.

Among the real Indians in the film are 81 year old Chief Weasel of the Oglalla tribe, a survivor of the Wounded Knee Massacre, who spent eight years with the Buffalo Bill Cody Show; and Red Cloud, who helped wipe out Custer's forces at Little Big Horn; and Ben Black Elk, so a a medicine man and the most photographed Indian in America today.

Twenty thousand pounds of hay and 1000 pounds of grain were needed daily to feed the 600 horses used in the production. Thousands more pounds of feed were needed for buffalo and other stock used in the film.

- END -

 

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Источник: http://www.daveswarbirds.com/HTWWW/MGM.htm
Prime Video.

How the West Was Won Led Zeppelin DVD?

How the West Was Won is a live triple album by the English rock group Led Zeppelin, released by Atlantic Records on compact disc on 27 May 2003, DVD-Audio on 7 October 2003 and Blu-Ray Audio in 2018.

What happened to Kate on how the West was won?

After all of Luke’s platoon is killed, he returns west to find his family. Things are quiet for a time until a bounty hunter named Grey arrives to arrest Luke for desertion, pursuing Luke for months until Kate shoots him dead to protect her son. In the second season, Kate dies herself, in a barn fire.

How many seasons are there of how the West was won?

4

What year was how the West was won made?

February 21, 1963 (Netherlands)

How the West Was Won episode the enemy?

The Enemy is the third episode of the third and final season of How the West Was Won. It first aired on February 5, 1979.

Источник: https://www.mvorganizing.org/how-the-west-was-won-storyline/
Peter Canavese2008-09-10 18:13:42 -0700

3.5 / 4.0

Delivered big with breathtaking location work and an all-star cast...

165 min. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Directors: John Ford, Henry Hathaway, George Marshall. Cast: Carroll Baker, Lee J. Cobb, Henry Fonda, Carolyn Jones, Karl Malden.

/content/films/3215/3.jpg

With movie ticket sales slipping due to the ever-increasing multitude of home entertainment options, the studios and exhibitors are turning again to promoting "event" presentations of films, in large-form IMAX, the refined 3D process, or both. It's a throwback to the days when TV was young and "widescreen" was the gimmick designed to draw audiences into theatres. The ultimate widescreen process was Cinerama, with its three synchronized cameras, three synchronized projectors, and immersive curved screen. Though Cinerama produced a number of travelogue adventure films later emulated by IMAX, only two narrative features were shot in full Cinerama: 1962's The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm and How the West Was Won.

Both delivered spectacle, but the latter delivered big with breathtaking location work and an all-star cast that included James Stewart, Henry Fonda, John Wayne, Gregory Peck, Debbie Reynolds, Carroll Baker, and Eli Wallach, among many others. The concept was inspired by a series of articles in Life Magazine that described American westward expansion. Likewise, the film illustrates selected aspects of the taming of the frontier and the establishment of American cities. Three directors shared the helming duties for five chapters spanning 1838 to 1889: Henry Hathaway ("The Rivers", "The Plains" and "The Outlaws"), John Ford ("The Civil War"), and George Marshall ("The Railroad").

The Cinerama frame delivers impressive epic sweep, a breadth and depth of image. The narrative breadth sacrifices character depth, but the picture includes four spectacular action sequences: a fight between Stewart's mountain man Linus Rawlings and river pirates (including Walter Brennan), a Cheyenne attack on the caravan led by wagonmaster Roger Morgan (Robert Preston), a buffalo stampede, and a climactic train robbery pitting outlaw Charley Gant (Wallach) against lawmen Zeb Rawlings (George Peppard) and Lew Ramsay (Lee J. Cobb). The fun of waiting for each star to pop up isn't always rewarded with a satisfying characterization, but Fonda does the most impressive work, believably embodying the simple isolation of buffalo hunter Jethro Stuart.

So in what sense was the west won? According to the narration read by Spencer Tracy, it was "won from nature and from primitive man." Though it pre-dates political correctness, How the West Was Won intriguingly betrays an uneasy balance between pride of accomplishment in what was won and shame for what was lost, and how (the natives are exploited by business interests in "The Railroad"). The film's final images show modern structures (skyscapes, bridges and highways) where once the land was natural open range, and though the tone is optimistic and patriotic, it's not difficult to feel a wistfulness for the trade we've made in the great American adventure.

Bluray

Aspect ratios: 2.89:1 Anamorphic Widescreen

Number of discs: 2

Audio: Dolby TrueHD 5.1

Street date: 9/9/2008

Distributor: Warner Home Video

Warner's special edition of How the West Was Won breathes remarkable new life into a film that's known for its presentation as much as anything else. Previous home video editions have highlighted the limitations of putting Cinerama onto a television. The whole point of Cinerama, after all, was to provide an experience that could not be replicated at home. While that remains true, Warner's new Blu-ray and DVD discs do everything possible to make the experience of the film a special one.

That process begins with an astonishing new transfer presented in two different and satisfying ways. To begin with, the freshly-scrubbed crystal clarity of the print is peerless among films of this vintage. Cinerama was the IMAX of its time, and the improved resolution and remarkable depth (in comparison to the average 1962 film) shine in this presentation. More importantly, the seams and misalignments once an unfortunate byproduct of the coordinated three-camera, three-projector process have been digitally corrected. Though the seams are sometimes faintly discernable when one "panel" is a bit darker than another, anyone who's seen this film before will be surprised at how effectively and, well, seamlessly, the three images are married. A robust Dolby TrueHD surround track takes advantage of Cinerama's own surround sound process, providing an unusually immersive experience for a vintage film.

The Blu-ray set's second disc includes a very interesting bonus feature: a "Smilebox" process transfer that digitally stretches the image to replicate the wraparound Cinerama theatrical experience. I'll admit to skepticism about this feature, but in sampling it, I was surprised to discover that it does (at least on a widescreen TV) fairly effectively trick the eye into seeing the film with a "wraparound" effect (Cinerama having been designed to replicate our way of seeing with peripheral vision). In this version, the widescreen frame bows in the center so that the top of the frame resembles a smile and the bottom a frown, simulating the curvature of a Cinerama screen. Pretty interesting.

The version of the film presented here is the full Roadshow version, complete with "Overture," "Intermission" music, "Entr'Acte" and "Exit" music. (On Blu-ray, one can enjoy the entire film uninterrupted; on DVD, viewers can change discs at the break in the film.) Warner also supplies two significant bonus features. The first is a commentary by filmmaker David Strohmaier (Cinerama Adventure), director of Cinerama, Inc. John Sittig, film historian Rudy Behlmer, music historian Jon Burlingame and stuntman Loren Janes (whose name is unfortunately misspelled on the packaging). Film buffs will not be disappointed by this thorough and fact-packed commentary. It's very nicely put together, with Burlingame providing a focus on the use of folk music and original scoring and the others sharing observations on the Cinerama process and the film's production (like the hardship on the cast, who had to learn how to act without making eye contact with their fellow actors due to the alignment of Cinerama's three "eyes").

Also included is Strohmaier's feature-length documentary Cinerama Adventure (1:36:54), which I won't hesitate to call the definitive doc on the subject of the historic film process. Strohmaier honors the many pioneers, from inventors to technicians to impresarios, that made Cinerama a fast-burning sensation. "Adventure" is not hyperbole: in film-history terms, this is pretty remarkable stuff, and the anecdotes can be quite literally adventurous (as when the hungover Cinerama crew boarded a camera-equipped plane and went on an early morning run into an active volcano, above which the engines cut out). Among the many participants are Michael Todd, Jr., producer A.C. Lyles, composer David Raksin, director and Cinerama fan Joe Dante, and film historians Rudy Behlmer and Leonard Maltin. The documentary also includes a section on How the West Was Won, including comments by Carroll Baker, Debbie Reynolds, Eli Wallach, Russ Tamblyn, Claude Johnson, and and stuntmen Bob Morgan and Janes.

Also included is the film's Theatrical Trailer (3:02).

Fans of classic movies will thrill to this set, in any of its several editions: on 2-Disc Blu-Ray, 3-Disc DVD, or in an Ultimate Collector's Edition DVD package. The Blu-Ray comes in a booklet-style package with 40 pages of rare material and behind the scenes photos. The lion's share of the booklet reprints material from the pressbook and original deluxe program sold at the concession stand, but there's also a description of the digital technology used to produce the transfers.

>
Review gear:

Panasonic Viera TC-P55VT30 55" Plasma 1080p 3D HDTV

Oppo BDP-93 Universal Network 3D Blu-ray Disc Player

Denon AVR2112CI Integrated Network A/V Surround Receiver

Pioneer SP-BS41-LR Bookshelf Speaker (2)

Pioneer SP-C21 Center Speaker

Pioneer SW-8 Subwoofer


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The way the west was won -

Vintage Movie Posters Grading Criteria

Mint
A poster that has never been used or displayed and may show the most minor signs of age and wear. The poster should have no holes or tears.

Near Mint
A generally unused poster with fresh, saturated colors. May have minimal tears at folds. Has no significant holes, no paper loss, may have minor tears along edges, may have fine pin holes.

Very Fine
A poster with bright colour and crisp overall appearance. It may have very general signs of use including slight fold separation and fold wear. It may have pin holes or very minor tears. This is the highest grade allowed for a poster that has been restored either on linen or on paper.

Fine
A poster with good colors and overall clean appearance. It may have minor tears small paper loss and minor stains. It may have some fold seperation.

Good
An average poster with overall fresh color. May have tears, minor paper loss, minor hazing. Paper may be brittle due to age, may have minor stains. May have a small amount of writing in an unobtrusive place. May have medium or major restoration.

Fair
A poster with faded colors and brittle paper, showing significant signs of use. May have tears and paper loss. May have tape, writing, stains in image area. In need of restoration or had major restoration.

Poor
A poster that is worn, torn, and/or damaged. May have staining, cracking, dry rot, and/or large tears. May be heavily soiled, may have pieces missing. In need of major restoration.

All photographs and images used on our site are photographs of the actual poster/item you are buying, we do not use stock photographs.

Most Popular Poster Types

US Posters

LOBBY CARD
11 x 14" printed on heavy stock paper. Used as display in theatre lobbies. Originally made in sets of eight. Some sets have a title card, which contains credits and artwork, essentially a mini-poster. The remaining seven cards are coloured photographic credits and poster artwork showing different scenes from the movie.

WINDOW CARD
14 x 22" printed on heavy stock paper with the top 4-6 inches usually left blank for the local cinema owner to fill in the cinema and the date it was due to play. Largely discontinued during the 1970's.

HALF SHEET
22 x 28" printed on heavy stock paper. The image displayed is normally a smaller version of the main poster, although some do have different artworks and sometimes come in two versions.

INSERT
14 x 36" printed on heavy stock paper. Inserts usually have the same artwork as a one sheet. Popular with collectors since they are smaller and easier to frame. Normally come tri folded or rolled.

STYLE Y/FORTY BY SIXTY
40 x 60" printed on heavy stock paper. Rare since they were primarily used for major motion pictures only. Designed to be used outside the theatre, on an easel, normally at a drive-in movie theatre.

ONE-SHEET
27 x 41" printed on paper. This is the most common size of poster, intended to be displayed in a glass "marquee" case. It is the most sought after size by collectors. Since the 1980's most posters are sent to the theatre rolled and maybe slightly smaller measuring 27" by 40" and with the advent of backlit light boxes a growing number of modern movie posters are available double-sided and the more traditional single-sided.

THREE-SHEET
41 x 81" printed on paper. These were printed on two or three separate sheets designed to overlap, few survive. Used for larger advertising spaces, normally posted on walls, perfect for huge movie theatres the drive-in, where people could see them from a distance. From the 1970's on, three-sheets were sometimes printed in one piece and issued as "international" versions to be used abroad.

BRITISH Posters

BRITISH QUAD
30 x 40" Most common poster size used in the UK. British Quads are horizontal and may have different artwork to the US one sheet. Like a US one sheet they normally come in two versions. Like a US one sheet they are usually supplied single-sided or more commonly now as a double sided poster.

BRITISH ONE-SHEET
27 X 40", printed on paper. Very rarely used size.

ITALIAN Posters

ITALIAN LOCANDINA
13 x 28" six inches shorter than the US insert, very nice size to frame. Italian poster illustrators are some of the best in the industry.

ITALIAN PHOTOBUSTA
18 x 26" Glossy, high quality, used as lobby cards in Italy. Size may vary, either vertical or horizontal format. There are also double Photobusta or mini Photobusta.

2-FOGLIO (DUE)
(DUE): 39 x 55" This is the standard poster size used in Italy. Italian poster illustrators are some of the best in the industry.

4-FOGLIO
(QUATTRO) 55 x 79" Very large Italian poster printed in two pieces, often contains very beautiful artwork.

FRENCH Posters

FRENCH
47 x 63" (GRANDE) or 24 x 33" (PETITE) French movie posters normally come with different artwork to either the US or the UK. Like the Italian's some of the artwork is extrememly beautiful.

Источник: https://www.vintagemovieposters.co.uk/shop/how-the-west-was-won-movie-poster/

How the West Was Won storyline?

Setting off on a journey to the west in the 1830s, the Prescott family run into a man named Linus (James Stewart), who helps them fight off a pack of thieves. Linus then marries daughter Eve Prescott (Carroll Baker), and 30 years later goes off to fight in the Civil War with their son, with bloody results. Eve’s sister, Lily (Debbie Reynolds), heads further west and has adventures with a professional gambler (Gregory Peck), stretching all the way to San Francisco and into the 1880s.

How the West Was Won restoration?

Motion Picture Imaging performed digital restoration on How the West Was Won. The film was restored frame by frame at Prasad Corporation to remove dirt, tears, scratches, and other damage—restoring the original look. The restored version has been shown on television since October 2008, on the Encore Westerns channel.

Was Linus Rawlings a real person?

Linus Rawlings was born in 1810 and died in 1862. Eve Prescott Rawlings was born in 1820 and died in 1865.

How the West Was Won Blu-Ray review?

Colors are bold and vivid. Contrasts are rich and shadow detail is excellent. Cinerama offered three times the film negative area as a traditional movie, and thus was a very fine-grained photographic process by nature. The Blu-ray has very little grain and no video noise.

How the West Was Won running time?

2h 44m

How the West Was Won the forgotten cast?

Cast (in credits order)

James ArnessZeb Macahan
Fionnula FlanaganMolly Culhane
Bruce BoxleitnerLuke Macahan
Kathryn HolcombLaura Macahan
William Kirby CullenJosh Macahan

How was the West won in 1977?

Loosely based on the 1962 Cinerama film of the same name, A 2-hour movie, The Macahans, in 1976, mini-series in 1977, and as a regular series in 1978 and 1979….How the West Was Won (TV series)

How the West Was Won
StarringJames Arness Bruce Boxleitner Fionnula Flanagan Kathryn Holcomb William Kirby Cullen Vicki Schreck
ComposerJerrold Immel

How the West Was Won locations?

How the West Was Won (1962) – Ridgway’s Hartwell Park, Cow Creek, and the Katie’s Meadow (Debbie’s meadow) areas used by director Henry Hathaway, who later used the same areas for True Grit. The meadow was used for the scene where wagon master Robert Preston proposes to Debbie Reynolds.

Why did How the West Was Won end?

Sadly, what makes How The West Was Won so unique today was a contributing factor to its premature demise. The feature-length episodes were “a tremendous physical workload,” Arness said. He had to leave the series in 1979 to have surgery on a “bum leg” that was exacerbated by the extensive location shooting.

How the West was won last episode?

The Slavers

Is how the West was won on Netflix?

Watch How the West Was Won on Netflix Today! NetflixMovies.com.

How the West was fun filming location?

Canadian Rockies

How the West Was Won train?

Directed by George Marshall (Destry Rides Again), the Railroad segment of How the West was Won centers on a disillusioned Army officer who tries to protect the construction of the railroad and its tyrannical boss who violates a treaty with Arapahos by building train tracks on their land.

How the West Was Won IMDb cast?

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
James ArnessZeb Macahan / 26 episodes, 1976-1979
Bruce BoxleitnerLuke Macahan / 26 episodes, 1976-1979
Kathryn HolcombLaura Macahan / 26 episodes, 1976-1979
William Kirby CullenJosh Macahan / 26 episodes, 1976-1979

How the West Was Won s3 e6 cast?

Cast (in credits order)

James ArnessZeb Macahan
Bruce BoxleitnerLuke Macahan
Kathryn HolcombLaura Macahan
William Kirby CullenJosh Macahan
Vicki SchreckJessie Macahan

How the West Was Won music?

How The West Was Won (Original Soundtrack)

How the West was born cast?

Cast (in credits order) verified as complete

Carroll BakerEve Prescott
Henry FondaJethro Stuart
Carolyn JonesJulie Rawlings
Karl MaldenZebulon Prescott
Gregory PeckCleve Van Valen

How long is how the West was won?

How the West Was Done?

How to unlock the How the West Was Done achievement. For this achievement you’ll need to finish 5 story missions, 11 side missions and complete all 45 crew challenges. To avoid bugs complete the side missions as soon as they become available.

Is how the West was won on Amazon Prime?

Watch How the West Was Won

Peter Canavese2008-09-10 18:13:42 -0700

3.5 / 4.0

Delivered big with breathtaking location work and an all-star cast...

165 min. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Directors: John Ford, Henry Hathaway, George Marshall. Cast: Carroll Baker, Lee J. Cobb, Henry Fonda, Carolyn Jones, Karl Malden.

/content/films/3215/3.jpg

With movie ticket sales slipping due to the ever-increasing multitude of home entertainment options, the studios and exhibitors are turning again to promoting "event" presentations of films, in large-form IMAX, the refined 3D process, or both. It's a throwback to the days when TV was young and "widescreen" was the gimmick designed to draw audiences into theatres. The ultimate widescreen process was Cinerama, with its three synchronized cameras, three synchronized projectors, and immersive curved screen. Though Cinerama produced a number of travelogue adventure films later emulated by IMAX, only two narrative features were shot in full Cinerama: 1962's The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm and How the West Was Won.

Both delivered spectacle, but the latter delivered big with breathtaking location work and an all-star cast that included James Stewart, Henry Fonda, John Wayne, Gregory Peck, Debbie Reynolds, Carroll Baker, and Eli Wallach, among many others. The concept was inspired by a series of articles in Life Magazine that described American westward expansion. Likewise, the film illustrates selected aspects of the taming of the frontier and the establishment of American cities. Three directors shared the helming duties for five chapters spanning 1838 to 1889: Henry Hathaway ("The Rivers", "The Plains" and "The Outlaws"), John Ford ("The Civil War"), and George Marshall ("The Railroad").

The Cinerama frame delivers impressive epic sweep, a breadth and depth of image. The narrative breadth sacrifices character depth, but the picture includes four spectacular action sequences: a fight between Stewart's mountain man Linus Rawlings and river pirates (including Walter Brennan), a Cheyenne attack on the caravan led by wagonmaster Roger Morgan (Robert Preston), a buffalo stampede, and a climactic train robbery pitting outlaw Charley Gant (Wallach) against lawmen Zeb Rawlings (George Peppard) and Lew Ramsay (Lee J. Cobb). The fun of waiting for each star to pop up isn't always rewarded with a satisfying characterization, but Fonda does the most impressive work, believably embodying the simple isolation of buffalo hunter Jethro Stuart.

So in what sense was the west won? According to the narration read by Spencer Tracy, it was "won from nature and from primitive man." Though it pre-dates political correctness, How the West Was Won intriguingly betrays an uneasy balance between pride of accomplishment in what was won and shame for what was lost, and how (the natives are exploited by business interests in "The Railroad"). The film's final images show modern structures (skyscapes, bridges and highways) where once the land was natural open range, and though the tone is optimistic and patriotic, it's not difficult to feel a wistfulness for the trade we've made in the great American adventure.

Bluray

Aspect ratios: 2.89:1 Anamorphic Widescreen

Number of discs: 2

Audio: Dolby TrueHD 5.1

Street date: 9/9/2008

Distributor: Warner Home Video

Warner's special edition of How the West Was Won breathes remarkable new life into a film that's known for its presentation as much as anything else. Previous home video editions have highlighted the limitations of putting Cinerama onto a television. The whole point of Cinerama, after all, was to provide an experience that could not be replicated at home. While that remains true, Warner's new Blu-ray and DVD discs do everything possible to make the experience of the film a special one.

That process begins with an astonishing new transfer presented in two different and satisfying ways. To begin with, the freshly-scrubbed crystal clarity of the print is peerless among films of this vintage. Cinerama was the IMAX of its time, and the improved resolution and remarkable depth (in comparison to the average 1962 film) shine in this presentation. More importantly, the seams and misalignments once an unfortunate byproduct of the coordinated three-camera, three-projector process have been digitally corrected. Though the seams are sometimes faintly discernable when one "panel" is a bit darker than another, anyone who's seen this film before will be surprised at how effectively and, well, seamlessly, the three images are married. A robust Dolby TrueHD surround track takes advantage of Cinerama's own surround sound process, providing an unusually immersive experience for a vintage film.

The Blu-ray set's second disc includes a very interesting bonus feature: a "Smilebox" process transfer that digitally stretches the image to replicate the wraparound Cinerama theatrical experience. I'll admit to skepticism about this feature, but in sampling it, I was surprised to discover that it does (at least on a widescreen TV) fairly effectively trick the eye into seeing the film with a "wraparound" effect (Cinerama having been designed to replicate our way of seeing with peripheral vision). In this version, the widescreen frame bows in the center so that the top of the frame resembles a smile and the bottom a frown, simulating the curvature of a Cinerama screen. Pretty interesting.

The version of the film presented here is the full Roadshow version, complete with "Overture," "Intermission" music, "Entr'Acte" and "Exit" music. (On Blu-ray, one can enjoy the entire film uninterrupted; on DVD, viewers can change discs at the break in the film.) Warner also supplies two significant bonus features. The first is a commentary by filmmaker David Strohmaier (Cinerama Adventure), director of Cinerama, Inc. John Sittig, film historian Rudy Behlmer, music historian Jon Burlingame and stuntman Loren Janes (whose name is unfortunately misspelled on the packaging). Film buffs will not be disappointed by this thorough and fact-packed commentary. It's very nicely put together, with Burlingame providing a focus on the use of folk music and original scoring and the others sharing observations on the Cinerama process and the film's production (like the hardship on the cast, who had to learn how to act without making eye contact with their fellow actors due to the alignment of Cinerama's three "eyes").

Also included is Strohmaier's feature-length documentary Cinerama Adventure (1:36:54), which I won't hesitate to call the definitive doc on the subject of the historic film process. Strohmaier honors the many pioneers, from inventors to technicians to impresarios, that made Cinerama a fast-burning sensation. "Adventure" is not hyperbole: in film-history terms, this is pretty remarkable stuff, and the anecdotes can be quite literally adventurous (as when the hungover Cinerama crew boarded a camera-equipped plane and went on an early morning run into an active volcano, above which the engines cut out). Among the many participants are Michael Todd, Jr., producer A.C. Lyles, composer David Raksin, director and Cinerama fan Joe Dante, and film historians Rudy Behlmer and Leonard Maltin. The documentary also includes a section on How the West Was Won, including comments by Carroll Baker, Debbie Reynolds, Eli Wallach, Russ Tamblyn, Claude Johnson, and and stuntmen Bob Morgan and Janes.

Also included is the film's Theatrical Trailer (3:02).

Fans of classic movies will thrill to this set, in any of its several editions: on 2-Disc Blu-Ray, 3-Disc DVD, or in an Ultimate Collector's Edition DVD package. The Blu-Ray comes in a booklet-style package with 40 pages of rare material and behind the scenes photos. The lion's share of the booklet reprints material from the pressbook and original deluxe program sold at the concession stand, but there's also a description of the digital technology used to produce the transfers.

>
Review gear:

Panasonic Viera TC-P55VT30 55" Plasma 1080p 3D HDTV

Oppo BDP-93 Universal Network 3D Blu-ray Disc Player

Denon AVR2112CI Integrated Network A/V Surround Receiver

Pioneer SP-BS41-LR Bookshelf Speaker (2)

Pioneer SP-C21 Center Speaker

Pioneer SW-8 Subwoofer


Share this review:

Sponsored Links

Источник: http://grouchoreviews.com/reviews/3215

Alfred Newman

2-CD SET

THE COMPLETE SOUNDTRACK + 1 BONUS TRACK

4 STARS ALL MUSIC GUIDE

This set presents the complete original Alfred Newman soundtrack music to the 1962 epic-western film How the West Was Won, one of the last “old-fashioned” epic movies made by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer to enjoy great success. Set between 1839 and 1889, it follows four generations of a family (starting as the Prescotts) as they move ever westward, from western New York state to the Pacific Ocean. The film is divided into sections directed by Henry Hathaway, John Ford, and George Marshall.

The picture was filmed in the curved-screen three-projector Cinerama process and starred Carroll Baker, Lee J. Cobb, Henry Fonda, Carolyn Jones, Karl Malden, Gregory Peck, George Peppard, Robert Preston, Debbie Reynolds, James Stewart, Eli Wallach, John Wayne, and Richard Widmark, with narration by Spencer Tracy.

The score was listed at #25 on AFI’s 100 Years of Film Scores. In 1997, the film was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress as being deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”. The film won three Academy Awards for Best Writing, Story and Screenplay (James R. Webb), Best Film Editing, and Best Sound (Franklin Milton).

Music composed and conducted by ALFRED NEWMAN
The MGM Studio Orchestra / Vocals by Debbie Reynolds, The Whiskeyhill Quartet & The Ken Darby Singers.
Recorded in Hollywood, April 30, 1961-July 20, 1962.

(*) BONUS TRACKS:
Joe Pass (12 string-g), John Pisano (rhythm-g), Charlie Haden (b), Larry Bunker (d).

INCLUDES 16-PAGE BOOKLET

CD1: TOTAL TIME 70:41

01 OVERTURE: HOW THE WEST WAS WON/ I’M BOUND FOR THE PROMISED LAND/
SHENANDOAH/ ENDLESS PRAIRIE/ THE OX DRIVER/ I ’M BOUND FOR THE PROMISED
LAND/ HOW THE WEST WAS WON
02 MAIN TITLE
03 THIS IS THE WEST
04 THE ERIE CANAL
05 TWO HEARTS ON A TREE
06 SHENANDOAH
07 FIRST MEETING
08 FIRST KISS
09 THE MORNING AFTER
10 RIVER PIRATES/STALKING AND KILLING
11 GODSPEED EVE/ THE RAPIDS
12 THE BURIAL (BEREAVEMENT/ ROCK OF AGES/ FULFILLMENT)
13 WAGON TRAIN FORWARD (WAGON TRAIN/ WAR WITH MEXICO/ BANKS OF THE
SACRAMENTO/ WAIT FOR THE WAGON)
14 SIT DOWN SISTER
15 WANDERIN’
16 THE JUMP-OFF POINT
17 CLEVE VAN VALEN (CLEVE VAN VALEN/ WAGON TRAIN/ MORGAN, LILITH AND
AGGIE/ CLEVE AND THE MULE)
18 POOR WAYFARIN’ STRANGER
19 RAISE A RUCKUS TONIGHT
20 COME SHARE MY LIFE
21 CHEYENNES/ INDIAN FIGHT
22 CARELESS LOVE
23 GOLD CLAIM
24 WHAT WAS YOUR NAME IN THE STATES?
25 HE’S GONE AWAY
26 A HOME IN THE MEADOW
27 MARRIAGE PROPOSAL

CD 2: TOTAL TIME 71:17

01 ENTR’ACTE (HOW THE WEST WAS WON/ A HOME IN THE MEADOW/ NINE HUNDRED
MILES/ BANKS OF THE SACRAMENTO/ I’M BOUND FOR THE PROMISED LAND/ WHEN
JOHNNY COMES MARCHING HOME/ THE BATTLE HYMN OF THE REPUBLIC)
02 MR. LINCOLN
03 HE’S LINUS’ BOY
04 I’M SAD AND I’M LONELY
05 WHEN JOHNNY COMES MARCHING HOME
06 ZEB’S RETURN
07 THE PONY EXPRESS
08 A RAILROADER’S BRIDE I’LL BE
09 WORKIN’
10 THE JUGGLERS
11 NO GOODBYE
12 ZEB AND JETHRO
13 BUFFALO STAMPEDE/ AFTERMATH
14 CLIMB A HIGHER HILL
15 THE VAN VALEN AUCTION
16 GANT (DESPERADO)
17 NO GOODBYE #2
18 CELEBRATION
19 FINALE
20 FINALE ULTIMO
21 EXIT MUSIC
22 MISS BAILEY’S GHOST
23 A HOME IN THE MEADOW
24 WHEN I WAS SINGLE
25 SHENANDOAH
26 ROCK OF AGES
27 THE ERIE CANAL
28 WAIT FOR THE HOEDOWN [long]
29 FIRST MEETING #2

Data sheet CD

FORMATCD
DISCS NUMBER2
RECORDED0
LABEL CODE606376
STYLEJAZZ

More info

Источник: https://www.jazzmessengers.com/en/75387/alfred-newman/how-the-west-was-won-original-soundtrack

"How the West Was Won"
Re-issued on DVD in all its “Cinerama®” Glory

Read more at
in70mm.com
The 70mm Newsletter
Written by: Warner press releaseDate: Burbank, Calif. April 28, 2008
"How the West Was Won" the spectacular cinematic epic is restored to all its “Cinerama®” glory with three bonus-filled editions: ultimate collectors, two disc-special & blu-ray™ hi-def!

The wondrous western historical saga "How the West Was Won" gallops onto home theatre screens August 26th in three new restored and remastered editions. One of only two narrative feature films produced in the original Cinerama® three-panel widescreen process, "How the West Was Won" is a stunning epic, following four generations of a courageous New England farm family as they travel to the fertile Ohio Valley during America’s early westward expansion.

M-G-M and Cinerama®, Inc. spared no expense to give this sprawling Western saga the huge vistas made possible with the original Cinerama® process. After its initial theatrical engagements in theaters equipped with three synchronized projectors for Cinerama® presentation, the film was subsequently presented on traditional theater screens with the three separate Cinerama® panels being optically joined to form a standard 35mm 2.35:1 widescreen image, leaving most subsequent viewers puzzled by the annoying ‘join lines.’

Following several years of careful development, the technicians at Warner Bros. Motion Picture Imaging perfected a technology that could finally eliminate the ‘join lines,’ and unify the images into a superb viewing experience that captures the essence of the production’s initial road show exhibitions, with an aspect ratio of 2.89:1.
 
More in 70mm reading:

"How the West Was Won"

"Cinerama Adventure"

David Strohmaier

Internet link:

 
This ultimate western film gets the Ultimate treatment with "How the West Was Won" Ultimate Collector’s Edition ($59.92 SRP). The two disc Standard Definition Ultimate Collector’s Edition is loaded with collectible memorabilia including a 20-page theatrical press book reproduction, 10 behind-the-scenes photo cards and 10 postcards, and an exclusive movie poster offer. Streeting simultaneously will also be a glorious Blu-ray™ Hi-Def ($34.99 SRP) version. Exclusive to Blu-ray is the “SmileBox” version of the film which presents the image with a unique curvature that virtually recreates the true Cinerama® experience in a home theater. This Blu-ray™ Hi-Def Edition comes with a special Digi-book packaging featuring 32-pages of rare press materials and behind-the-scenes photos. The third new edition is a Two Disc-Special Edition in standard definition ($20.97 SRP).

Some of Hollywood’s biggest stars, including John Wayne, Henry Fonda, James Stewart, Richard Widmark, Gregory Peck, Lee J. Cobb, Debbie Reynolds and Carroll Baker star in "How the West Was Won". Set between 1839 and 1889 against the backgrounds of the Louisiana Purchase, the Civil War, buffalo hunters, the Pony Express and the first transcontinental railroad, the film consists of five segments, with direction by Henry Hathaway, John Ford and George Marshall, and written by James R. Webb and John Gay, suggested by a Life Magazine series of the same name. The film was the winner of 3 Academy Awards® (Best Screenplay, Best Sound and Best Editing) as well as being nominated for an additional five Oscars®, including Best Picture. In 1997, "How the West Was Won" was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the US National Film Registry.
 
 

"How the West Was Won" Special Features:

 
Film Historian Commentary Dave Strohmaier’s critically-acclaimed, feature-length documentary "Cinerama Adventure"

The Making of "How the West Was Won" (Archival featurette)
Original Theatrical trailer

HOW THE WEST WAS WON
165 minutes - Rated G
5.1 Dolby Digital – 2.89 Widescreen

HOW THE WEST WAS WON: ULTIMATE COLLECTOR’S EDITION
Catalog #: 1000039866
$59.92 SRP

HOW THE WEST WAS WON: SPECIAL EDITION
Catalog #: 1000019114
$20.97 SRP

HOW THE WEST WAS WON: BLU-RAY™ HI-DEF
Catalog #: 1000039748
$34.99 SRP
 
About "Cinerama Adventure"

"This production is simply perfect! It blends the history of the people behind Cinerama with the story of the making of the films and highlights the technical aspects of this pioneering widescreen format in an exiting and dramatic way"

Richard Greenhalgh, 2002
 
Go: back - top - back issues - news index
Updated 07-01-21
 
Источник: https://www.in70mm.com/news/2008/west/index.htm
Prime Video.

How the West Was Won Led Zeppelin DVD?

How the West Was Won is a live triple album by the English rock group Led Zeppelin, released by Atlantic Records on compact disc on 27 May 2003, DVD-Audio on 7 October 2003 and Blu-Ray Audio in 2018.

What happened to Kate on how the West was won?

After all of Luke’s platoon is killed, he returns west to find his family. Things are quiet for a time until a bounty hunter named Grey arrives to arrest Luke for desertion, pursuing Luke for months until Kate shoots him dead to protect her son. In the second season, Kate dies herself, in a barn fire.

How many seasons are there of how the West was won?

4

What year was how the West was won made?

February 21, 1963 (Netherlands)

How the West Was Won episode the enemy?

The Enemy is the third episode of the third and final season of How the West Was Won. It first aired on February 5, 1979.

Источник: https://www.mvorganizing.org/how-the-west-was-won-storyline/

As part of my flagging recommitment to this blog, I’ve dusted off my Warner Brothers 50 Film Collection, which I purchased back in early 2014.  I fairly regularly provided reviews of the films in that collection, which I’ve gradually watched in chronological order.  That ended in 2017, when my job duties increased and my time devoted to this blog declined even further.

That’s changing.  I finally published the review of Ben-Hur I began almost two years ago, and, now, I move on to the next film in the set: How the West Was Won, from 1962.

With an Infinity-War-esque breadth of cast, How the West Was Won sets out to tell the ambitious tale of, well, how the American west was “won” from approximately 1840 until about 1890.  The portrayal of this half-century includes a series of segments divided by significant time jumps.

The film includes portions on westward migration via river and its dangers (circa 1840), westward migration across the plains (circa 1850), the Civil War (1861–65, obviously), the creation of a transcontinental railroad (late 1860s), and, finally, the last days of the Wild West outlaws (circa 1890).  Although there are new, critical characters introduced in each segment, the story is tied together loosely by following members of a single family across four generations.

I wasn’t kidding when I referenced the massive cast.  Although some of these actors only have a few minutes of screentime, the all-star players include Jimmy Stewart, John Wayne, Henry Fonda, Karl Malden, Debbie Reynolds, Lee Van Cleef, Agnes Moorehead, Gregory Peck, Eli Wallach, Lee J. Cobb, Harry Morgan, Carroll Baker, Walter Brennan, and a young Harry Dean Stanton.  Spencer Tracy narrates.

Aside from the scope of the story and the massive cast, two things about How the West Was Won jump out: the score and the cinematography.  There’s not much to say about the score aside from–it’s excellent.

The cinematography is a little more complicated.

Watching it in 1080p on blu-ray on a modern, 4k, widescreen television, the colors and vibrancy of the shots are incredible.  But there’s something unmistakably odd about the way the film is shot.  Specifically, the wide shots, while downright panoramic, appear to be a composite of multiple shots.

And that’s because they are.

It was a process called “Cinerama.”  Specifically, “three-strip” Cinerama.  It was designed to make movies look more breathtaking than ever before.  Three-strip Cinerama movies were shot on three different cameras and then projected onto a special, tripartite screen.

By all accounts, people who actually saw Cinerama films in person in the 50s and 60s attest to its beauty.  Unfortunately, that beauty doesn’t translate perfectly to a smaller screen.  Even with the abilities of modern technology, the best that Warner Brothers could do was to create a print that has lines of separation among the three shots that are fairly obvious at times.

This by no means ruins the film, and the wilderness settings are so beautiful that it’s a minor defect at most.  But it is a noticeable one.

The story behind Cinerama is so complex and intertwined with movie history itself that one of the special features on the How the West Was Won blu-ray is a documentary about the history of Cinerama—a documentary that is itself feature-length, clocking in at over 90 minutes.

The curious-looking visuals aside, the substance of the film is as scattershot as one would imagine, given its ambitious nature.  Clearly, the filmmakers wanted to tell the story of how the west came to be settled, but also felt the need to have a strong through-line.   That decision, while understandable, makes the storytelling a little more labored.

In hindsight, the movie may have worked better as an anthology film that included truly distinct stories representing each distinct aspects of western settlement that wound up being included in the finished movie.  Untethered from the somewhat contrived story of a single family, the film may have fared better from a plot standpoint.

As it is, we get a lot of half-developed characters who represent archetypes, offering only brief commentary on several different topics that each could have been their own films (and have been, many times, throughout history).

That’s not to say this is a bad movie.  It isn’t.  As I said, the score, cast, and scenery all make this one worthwhile.  Yet, it turns out to be a sampler platter rather than a solid meal, with more attention paid to presentation and ingredients than recipe.

It’s a worthwhile experience that’s probably a not as much a snapshot of ninteenth-century America as it is a snapshot of the early 1960s film industry.

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This entry was posted in Commentary, Movies, Reviews and tagged Carroll Baker, Commentary, Debbie Reynolds, George Peppard, Gregory Peck, Henry Fonda, How the West Was Won, Jimmy Stewart, John Wayne, Karl Malden, Lee J. Cobb, Movies, Reviews, Warner Bros., Warner Brothers. Bookmark the permalink.

Источник: https://theaxisofego.com/2019/12/02/untimely-movie-review-how-the-west-was-won/

How the West Was Won storyline?

Setting off on a journey to the west in the 1830s, the Prescott family run into a man named Linus (James Stewart), who helps them fight off a pack of thieves. Linus then marries daughter Eve Prescott (Carroll Baker), and target mankato pharmacy years later goes off to fight in the Civil War with their son, with bloody results. Eve’s sister, Lily (Debbie Reynolds), heads further west and has adventures with a professional gambler (Gregory Peck), stretching all the way to San Francisco and into the 1880s.

How the West Was Won restoration?

Motion Picture Imaging performed digital restoration on How the West Was Won. The film was restored frame by frame at Prasad Corporation to remove dirt, tears, scratches, and other damage—restoring the original look. The way the west was won restored version has been shown on television since October 2008, on the Encore Westerns channel.

Was Linus Rawlings a real person?

Linus Rawlings was born in 1810 and died in 1862. Eve Prescott Rawlings was born in 1820 and died in 1865.

How the West Was Won Blu-Ray review?

Colors are bold and vivid. Contrasts are rich and shadow detail is excellent. Cinerama offered three times the film negative area as a traditional movie, and thus was a very fine-grained photographic process by nature. The Blu-ray has very little grain and no video noise.

How the West Was Won running time?

2h 44m

How the West Was Won the forgotten cast?

Cast (in credits order)

James ArnessZeb Macahan
Fionnula FlanaganMolly Culhane
Bruce BoxleitnerLuke Macahan
Kathryn HolcombLaura Macahan
William Kirby CullenJosh Macahan

How was the West won in 1977?

Loosely the way the west was won on the 1962 Cinerama film of the same name, A 2-hour movie, The Macahans, in 1976, mini-series in 1977, and as a regular series in 1978 and 1979….How the West Was Won (TV series)

How the West Was Won
StarringJames Arness Bruce Boxleitner Fionnula Flanagan Kathryn Holcomb William Kirby Cullen Vicki Schreck
ComposerJerrold Immel

How the West Was Won locations?

How the West Was Won (1962) – Ridgway’s Hartwell Park, Cow Creek, and the Katie’s Meadow (Debbie’s meadow) areas used by director Henry Hathaway, who later used the same areas for True Grit. The meadow was used for the scene where wagon master Robert Preston proposes to Debbie Reynolds.

Why did How the West Was Won end?

Sadly, what makes How The West Was Won so unique today was a contributing factor to its premature demise. The feature-length episodes were “a tremendous physical workload,” Arness said. He had to leave the series in 1979 to have surgery on a “bum leg” that was exacerbated by the extensive location shooting.

How the West was won last episode?

The Slavers

Is how the West was won on Netflix?

Watch How the West Was Won on Netflix Today! NetflixMovies.com.

How the West was fun filming location?

Canadian Rockies

How the West Was Won train?

Directed by George Marshall (Destry Rides Again), the Railroad segment of How the West was Won centers on a disillusioned Army officer who tries to protect the construction of the railroad and its tyrannical boss who violates a treaty with Arapahos by building train tracks on their land.

How the West Was Won IMDb cast?

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
James ArnessZeb Macahan / 26 episodes, 1976-1979
Bruce BoxleitnerLuke Macahan / 26 episodes, 1976-1979
Kathryn HolcombLaura Macahan / 26 episodes, 1976-1979
William Kirby CullenJosh Macahan / 26 episodes, 1976-1979

How the West Was Won s3 e6 cast?

Cast (in credits order)

James ArnessZeb Macahan
Bruce BoxleitnerLuke Macahan
Kathryn HolcombLaura Macahan
William Kirby CullenJosh Macahan
Vicki SchreckJessie Macahan

How the West Was Won music?

How The West Was Won (Original Soundtrack)

How the West was born cast?

Cast (in credits order) verified as complete

Carroll BakerEve Prescott
Henry FondaJethro Stuart
Carolyn JonesJulie Rawlings
Karl MaldenZebulon Prescott
Gregory PeckCleve Van Valen

How long is how the West was won?

How the West Was Done?

How to unlock the How the West Was Done achievement. For this achievement you’ll need to finish 5 story missions, 11 side missions and complete all 45 crew challenges. To avoid bugs complete the side missions as soon as they become available.

Is how the West was won on Amazon Prime?

Watch How the West Was Won

Alfred Newman

2-CD SET

THE COMPLETE SOUNDTRACK + 1 BONUS TRACK

4 STARS ALL MUSIC GUIDE

This set presents the complete original Alfred Newman soundtrack music to the 1962 epic-western film How the West Was Won, one of the last “old-fashioned” epic movies made by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer to enjoy great success. Set between 1839 and 1889, it follows four generations of a family (starting as the Prescotts) as they move ever westward, from western New York state to the Pacific Ocean. The film is divided into sections directed by Henry Hathaway, John Ford, and George Marshall.

The picture was filmed in the curved-screen three-projector Cinerama process and starred Carroll Baker, Lee J. Cobb, Henry Fonda, Carolyn Jones, Karl Malden, Gregory Peck, George Peppard, Robert Preston, Debbie Reynolds, James Stewart, Eli Wallach, John Wayne, and Richard Widmark, with narration by Spencer Tracy.

The score was listed at #25 on AFI’s 100 Years of Film Scores. In 1997, the film was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress as being deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”. The film won three Academy Awards for Best Writing, Story and Screenplay (James R. Webb), Best Film Editing, and Best Sound (Franklin Milton).

Music composed and conducted by ALFRED NEWMAN
The MGM Studio Orchestra / Vocals by Debbie Reynolds, The Whiskeyhill Quartet & The Ken Darby Singers.
Recorded in Hollywood, April 30, 1961-July 20, 1962.

(*) BONUS TRACKS:
Joe Pass (12 string-g), John Pisano (rhythm-g), Charlie Haden (b), Larry Bunker (d).

INCLUDES 16-PAGE BOOKLET

CD1: TOTAL TIME 70:41

01 OVERTURE: HOW THE WEST WAS WON/ I’M BOUND FOR THE PROMISED LAND/
SHENANDOAH/ ENDLESS PRAIRIE/ THE OX DRIVER/ I ’M BOUND FOR THE PROMISED
LAND/ HOW THE WEST WAS WON
02 MAIN TITLE
03 THIS IS THE WEST
04 THE ERIE CANAL
05 TWO HEARTS ON A Prime video amazon login
06 SHENANDOAH
07 FIRST MEETING
08 FIRST KISS
09 THE MORNING AFTER
10 RIVER PIRATES/STALKING AND KILLING
11 GODSPEED EVE/ THE RAPIDS
12 THE BURIAL (BEREAVEMENT/ ROCK OF AGES/ FULFILLMENT)
13 WAGON TRAIN FORWARD (WAGON TRAIN/ WAR WITH MEXICO/ BANKS OF THE
SACRAMENTO/ WAIT FOR THE WAGON)
14 SIT DOWN SISTER
15 WANDERIN’
16 THE JUMP-OFF POINT
17 CLEVE VAN VALEN (CLEVE VAN VALEN/ WAGON TRAIN/ MORGAN, LILITH AND
AGGIE/ CLEVE AND THE MULE)
18 POOR WAYFARIN’ STRANGER
19 RAISE A RUCKUS TONIGHT
20 COME SHARE MY LIFE
21 CHEYENNES/ INDIAN FIGHT
22 CARELESS LOVE
23 GOLD CLAIM
24 WHAT WAS YOUR NAME IN THE STATES?
25 HE’S GONE AWAY
26 A HOME IN THE MEADOW
27 MARRIAGE PROPOSAL

CD 2: TOTAL TIME 71:17

01 ENTR’ACTE (HOW THE WEST WAS WON/ A HOME IN THE MEADOW/ NINE HUNDRED
MILES/ BANKS OF THE SACRAMENTO/ I’M BOUND FOR THE PROMISED LAND/ WHEN
JOHNNY COMES MARCHING HOME/ THE BATTLE HYMN OF THE REPUBLIC)
02 MR. LINCOLN
03 HE’S LINUS’ BOY
04 I’M SAD AND I’M LONELY
05 WHEN JOHNNY COMES MARCHING HOME
06 ZEB’S RETURN
07 THE PONY EXPRESS
08 A RAILROADER’S BRIDE I’LL BE
09 WORKIN’
10 THE JUGGLERS
11 NO GOODBYE
12 ZEB AND JETHRO
13 BUFFALO STAMPEDE/ AFTERMATH
14 CLIMB A HIGHER HILL
15 THE VAN VALEN AUCTION
16 GANT (DESPERADO)
17 NO GOODBYE #2
18 CELEBRATION
19 FINALE
20 FINALE ULTIMO
21 EXIT MUSIC
22 MISS BAILEY’S GHOST
23 A Fifth third bank routing number detroit mi IN THE MEADOW
24 WHEN I WAS SINGLE
25 SHENANDOAH
26 ROCK OF AGES
27 THE ERIE CANAL
28 WAIT FOR THE HOEDOWN [long]
29 FIRST MEETING #2

Data sheet CD

FORMATCD
DISCS NUMBER2
RECORDED0
LABEL CODE606376
STYLEJAZZ

More info

Источник: https://www.jazzmessengers.com/en/75387/alfred-newman/how-the-west-was-won-original-soundtrack

As part of my flagging recommitment to this blog, I’ve dusted off my Warner Brothers 50 Film Collection, which I purchased back in early 2014.  I fairly regularly provided reviews of the films in that collection, which I’ve gradually watched in chronological order.  That ended in 2017, when my job duties increased and my time devoted to this blog declined even further.

That’s changing.  I finally published the review of Ben-Hur I began almost two years ago, and, now, I move on to the next film in the set: How the West Was The way the west was won, from 1962.

With an Infinity-War-esque breadth of cast, How the West Was Won sets out to tell the ambitious tale of, well, how the American west was “won” from approximately 1840 until about 1890.  The the way the west was won of this half-century includes a series of segments divided by significant time jumps.

The film includes portions on westward migration via river and its dangers (circa 1840), westward migration across the plains (circa 1850), the Civil War (1861–65, obviously), the creation of a transcontinental railroad (late 1860s), and, finally, the last days of the Wild West outlaws (circa 1890).  Although there are new, critical characters introduced in each segment, the story is tied together loosely by following members of a single family across four generations.

I wasn’t kidding when I referenced the massive cast.  Although some of these actors only have a few minutes of screentime, the all-star players include Jimmy Stewart, John Wayne, Henry Fonda, Karl Malden, Debbie Reynolds, Lee Van Cleef, Agnes Moorehead, Gregory Peck, Eli Wallach, Lee J. Cobb, Harry Morgan, Carroll Baker, Walter Brennan, and a young Harry Dean Stanton.  Spencer Tracy narrates.

Aside from the scope of the story and the massive cast, two things about How the West Was Won jump out: the score and the cinematography.  There’s not much to say about the score aside from–it’s excellent.

The cinematography is a little more complicated.

Watching it in 1080p on blu-ray on a modern, 4k, widescreen television, the colors and vibrancy of the shots are incredible.  But there’s something unmistakably odd about the way the film is shot.  Specifically, the wide shots, while downright panoramic, appear to be a composite of multiple shots.

And that’s because they are.

It was a process called “Cinerama.”  Specifically, “three-strip” Cinerama.  It was designed to make movies look more breathtaking than ever before.  Three-strip Cinerama movies were shot on three different cameras and then projected onto a special, tripartite screen.

By all accounts, people who actually saw Cinerama films in person in the 50s and 60s attest to its beauty.  Unfortunately, that beauty doesn’t translate perfectly to a smaller screen.  Even with the abilities of modern technology, the best that Warner Brothers could do was to create a print that has lines of separation among the three shots that are fairly obvious at the way the west was won by no means ruins the film, and the wilderness settings are so beautiful that it’s a minor defect at most.  But it is a noticeable one.

The story behind Cinerama is so complex and intertwined with movie history itself that one of the special features on the How the West Was Won blu-ray is a documentary about the history of Cinerama—a documentary that is itself feature-length, clocking in at over 90 minutes.

The curious-looking visuals aside, the substance of the film is as scattershot as one would imagine, given its ambitious nature.  Clearly, the filmmakers wanted to tell the story of how the west came to be settled, but the way the west was won felt the need to have navy federal business account phone number strong through-line.   That decision, while understandable, makes the storytelling a little more labored.

In hindsight, the movie may have worked better as an anthology film that included truly distinct stories representing each distinct aspects of western settlement that wound up being included in the finished movie.  Untethered from the somewhat contrived story of a single family, the film may have fared better from a plot standpoint.

As it is, we get a lot of half-developed characters who represent archetypes, offering only brief commentary on several different topics that each could have been nick holliday instagram own films (and have been, many times, throughout history).

That’s not to say this is a bad movie.  It the way the west was won As I said, the score, cast, and scenery all make this one worthwhile.  Yet, it turns out to be a sampler platter rather than a solid meal, with more attention paid to presentation and ingredients than recipe.

It’s a worthwhile experience that’s probably a not as much a snapshot of ninteenth-century America as it is a snapshot of the early 1960s film industry.

Like this:

LikeLoading.

Related

This entry was posted in Commentary, Movies, Reviews and tagged Carroll Baker, Commentary, Debbie Reynolds, George Peppard, Gregory Peck, Henry Fonda, How the West Was Won, Jimmy Stewart, John Wayne, Karl Malden, Lee J. Cobb, Movies, Reviews, Warner North central high school deceased alumni, Warner Brothers. Bookmark the permalink.

Источник: https://theaxisofego.com/2019/12/02/untimely-movie-review-how-the-west-was-won/

THE PRODUCTION OF
"HOW THE WEST WAS WON"
(as told in the 1963 MGM-Random House souvenir book of the movie)

Filming the fully definitive the way the west was won of the winning of the American West was one of the most demanding projects ever undertaken. This was never attempted before. The story encompasses fifty years in the westward expansion of the American nation-from 1839 to 1889. It includes momentous historic events of that era related to the personal stories of three generations of a typical pioneer family. Long before this heroic drama was placed before the Cinerama cameras, the project demanded and utilized the vast resources of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, the world's largest studios, and the Cinerama Corporation. Before filming, the collaboration took four directions-historical research, scientific research to refine and improve Cinerama techniques, whole foods catering san francisco planning, including script writing and casting, and selection of locations for shooting. Bernard Smith received the assignment of producer, and it was he who guided the four aspects. James R. Webb, noted writer and authority on the history of America, won the assignment of writing the original screenplay. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Cinerama united to meet the challenge of filming a full-length drama in the remarkable Cinerama medium - a challenge that tested the ingenuity of artists and artisans and the the way the west was won resources of both corporations. Every phase of production was geared to the remarkable capacity of the Cinerama camera to capture for the screen a motion picture with absolute reality. HOW THE WEST WAS WON concerns itself with the rich human stories of our pioneers. The search for locations for the filming was one of the most extensive ever inaugurated by a film company. Over 75 per cent of the film was filmed on locations far from the studios in Culver City, California. Each locale had to be devoid of any signs of civilization.


Director Henry Hathaway (back to camera) and Cinerama's Tom Conroy (peering through lens) plan an Erie Canal scene setup.

The entire Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer staff of location experts searched for locations which would recall the America of the 1800s. These men traveled through the historic Ohio River Valley, once a water highway to the West, and into the heart of the proud Rocky Mountains. They rode over unused paths and roads as long as four-wheeled vehicles would carry them, and by foot along trails where there were no roads. They took thousands of photographs and sent them back to the studio as often as they could get to a post office. From these efforts came eleven key locations.

Among the locations selected were the Black Hills of South Dakota, sacred land of the Sioux Indians, and home of the largest remaining herd of buffalo in the United States; the Uncompaghre National Forest in the Rockies of Colorado which has an average elevation of 11,500 feet and where there are 52 peaks towering above 14,000 feet. In addition, the area bordering the Ohio and Cumberland Rivers in Kentucky were selected, where pioneers had sailed rafts and mountain men had paddled their pelt-laden canoes. Monument Valley on the Arizona-Utah border, one of nature's spectacular wonders also was an important location.


Miss Reynolds brought safely ashore after being tossed into the ice cold Gunnison River in Colorado. Director Hathaway (back to camera) supervising the action.


Behind-the-camera view of the hazardous wagon train river crossing 11,000 feet in the Rocky Mountains.

The production brought together Hollywood's most experienced creators, craftsmen and technicians, utilizing each of thirty-eight specialized MGM departments representing 117 arts and professions and 253 skilled technical crafts. The screenplay focused on five closely related yet distinct periods - the early days of the Ohio River Valley, the covered wagon and gold rush, the Civil War, the building of the transcontinental railroad and the Southwest. With the most careful scheduling, the film could not conceivably be completed in less than ten months. If one director and cinematographer were to have carried the entire burden, it would have required years to complete the motion picture.

To solve the bank of america 800 number customer service of time, three of Hollywood's most renowned directors and four veteran camera-men worked closely and combined their special talents. The directors were John Ford, Henry Hathaway and George Marshall, and the cinematographers were William Daniels, Milton Krasner, Charles Lang, Jr., and Joseph La Shelle. These men were vastly stimulated by the storytelling potential of Cinerama and they adapted themselves to this new medium. They made many contributions to the art and craft of Cinerama to provide more exciting dramatic action.

This was equally true of everyone connected with HOW THE WEST WAS WON. Hollywood's unusual interest in the picture made it possible to assemble the splendid cast starring Carroll Baker, Lee J. Cobb, Henry Fonda, Carolyn Jones, Karl Malden, Gregory Peck, George Peppard, Robert Preston, Debbie Reynolds, James Stewart, Eli Wallach, John Wayne, Richard Widmark and co-starring Brigid Bazlen, Walter Brennan, David Brian, Andy Devine, Raymond Massey, Agnes Moorehead, Henry (Harry) Morgan, Thelma Ritter, Mickey Shaughnessy and Russ Tamblyn. Spencer Tracy became the twenty-fourth star of the cast, and although he is not seen in the picture, he serves in the vital role of narrator. His rich and dramatic voice weaves together the threads of history's tapestry as the West is won.


Director John Ford rehearses a scene with Eve and Zeb.

In total, a year of meticulous preparation was spent preceding the actual start of camera work. The research alone filled 87 volumes which were cross indexed for easier reference. These included more than 10,000 photographs, paintings rascal flatts i ll be home for christmas sketches which became the way the west was won source of authentic background information. It was a library for the directors, the set designers, the costumers, the makeup and hairdressing craftsmen. The material provided information on how the pioneer built his crude rafts, his tools and cooking equipment, and the types of weapons he and his Indian adversaries used. The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer research department purchased 195 books which were added to an already outstanding collection of early Americana.

A steady stream of color drawings and sketches came from the studio's art department. Visualizations depicting all of the action from river crossing by covered wagons to Indian battles were made. Seventyseven individual sets were designed. Sets were built higher, wider and more complete than before because the Cinerama camera magnifies each detail tremendously.


The Cinerama camera captures the grandeur of California's Sierra Nevada Mountains in epic scene.

Closeups of Debbie Reynolds, or of Gregory Peck, were filmed the way the west was won two or three feet, and in pre-production tests, it was discovered that the camera glaringly revealed such minute things as machine stitching on the costumes. So, each garment had to be remade and sewn by hand in the studio's wardrobe department.

There could be no substitute for the rough, uneven homespun materials worn by the pioneers. Fifty yards of any particular fabric was the minimum order accepted by the few factories still specializing in these fabrics. A major source, oddly enough, was India, where the ancient art of handlooming has survived a mechanical age. Thousands of yards of this homespun were purchased for the costume department.

All the moccasins available in stores on Indian reservations around the nation were purchased for the production, but even these were not enough to supply the 1500 pairs used in this picture. Still more were handmade by Indian craftsmen on special order, and studio bootmakers turned out 2300 pairs of period shoes. Indian craftsmen made authentic headdresses, mostly of genuine eagle feathers and hundreds of yards of intricate beadwork.


John Wayne and Director Synchrony bank value city bill pay Ford, long time friends and co-workers, discuss a scene together.

The total number of wardrobe items ran into multiple thousands. It was the most exacting costume assignment ever attempted for a motion picture.

A few production statistics, selected at random, give a general idea of the problems faced. Bit players and extras appearing in the film totaled 12,617. There were 630 horses, 15o mules and 50 head of oxen which were tended by 203 wranglers. From reservations in South Dakota, Colorado and Utah, 350 Indians were recruited. There were 107 Conestoga and trail wagons.

Paradoxically, without modern transportation, it would have been impossible for the film crew to follow the trail of the pioneers across America. No mass movement in the history of filming on location comes close to matching HOW THE WEST WAS WON. The entire company was literally placed on wheels. It was completely self-contained, from portable dressing rooms for the stars to compact 7500 pound Leroi generators to furnish the millions of candlepower needed to light the various sets and locations.

At the height of production, the pool of studio vehicles, continually on the move over transcontinental highways for months on end, numbered 71, including 55 foot, 18 wheel semi-trailer trucks with 60,000 pound capacity, 50 foot vans, two-ton vans, four wheel drive equipment, caterpillars, buses, station wagons and passenger cars.

From the start of production on May 26, 1961, in the Ohio River Valley, with headquarters at Paducah, Kentucky, this group of vehicles accumulated almost a million miles of travel while shuttling between the studio and locations all over America.

Many of the locations selected for the film had never been photographed for a motion picture. Battery Rock in the Ohio River Valley, Courthouse Mountain, the Pinnacles and Chimney Rock in the Colorado Rockies were such areas. Locations were established in the high Sierras, the hills and plains of South Dakota and arid stretches of desert in the Southwest. To reach some of the more inaccessible locations, it was often necessary to bulldoze and maintain roads to accommodate the massive equipment needed at the sites. As the last vestiges of the Old West rapidly disappear, HOW THE WEST WAS WON recaptures both the stories and the land of the pioneers.


Henry Fonda chats with two members of the Arapahoe tribe while on location in the Black Hills of South Dakota.

The spirit of the Old West is relived in the songs it inspired. The tunes, tender and haunting, love ballads, and stirring marches which came from the hearts of the pioneers, have been woven into the score of HOW THE WEST WAS WON.

Heading a team of outstanding musical talent is Alfred Newman, an Academy Award winner five times. He won his first Oscar for "Alexander's Ragtime Band" and subsequently for "Song of Bernadette," "Mother Wore Tights," "Love Is A Many Splendored Thing" and "The King and I."

Associated with Newman are: Robert Emmett Dolan, music co-ordinator; Ken Darby, who wrote the lyrics to the film's title song, with music by Newman; and Sammy Cahn, Academy Award winner in collaboration for the song "Three Coins In The Fountain." Mr. Cahn wrote the lyrics for "Home In The Meadow," recurring theme of HOW THE WEST WAS WON.

Newman's score includes authentic songs of each historical period - the Rivers, the Plains, the Civil War, the Railroad and the Outlaws. His overture contains songs which will live as long as there is an America, among them "Shenandoah," and "Bound For the Promised Land."

In every aspect, HOW THE WEST WAS WON was a memorable project. The end result presents for the first time on a screen vast enough to capture its scope, the titanic story of the winning of the West.


PRODUCTION NOTES

It required more than two months for wranglers to corral the 2000 buffalo seen in the film's stampede scene, filmed in South Dakota.

More than 5000 pairs of period shoes and Indian moccasins were hand made to be worn by characters in HOW THE WEST WAS WON.

Thousands of yards of material had to be ordered from ancient looms in India for the special costumes. The Cinerama cameras are so critical they show up as false any attempts to substitute modern fabrics with machine stitching. So, all costumes had to be sewn by hand.

Five famous Indian tribes are represented among the Indian personnel of the film - the Brules, Oclallas and Minnecanjous of the Sioux nation, and the Arapahoes and Cheyennes.

Among the real Indians in the film are 81 year old Chief Weasel of the Oglalla tribe, a survivor of the Wounded Knee Massacre, who spent eight years with the Buffalo Bill Cody Show; and Red Cloud, who helped wipe out Custer's forces at Little Big Horn; and Ben Black Elk, so a a medicine man and the most photographed Indian in America today.

Twenty thousand pounds of hay and 1000 pounds of grain were needed daily to feed the 600 horses used in the production. Thousands more pounds of feed were needed for buffalo and other stock used in the film.

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Источник: http://www.daveswarbirds.com/HTWWW/MGM.htm

Oscar-winner John Wayne, better known as “The Duke” to his fans, starred in over 165 movies throughout his career, oftentimes playing the swaggering, macho hero of westerns and war epics. But how many of his titles remain classics? Let’s take a look back at 25 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1907 as Marion Robert Morrison, Wayne worked his way up from bit player to leading man, appearing in a number of poverty row, Z-grade westerns throughout the 1930s. He shot to stardom with his role in John Ford‘s “Stagecoach” (1939), which brought new shades of nuance and artistry to the Cowboys and Indians genre. It also kicked off a lucrative, decades-long partnership between the director and star, who would make over two dozen films together, including “The Quiet Man” (1952), “The Searchers” (1956) and “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance” (1962).

Despite being one of the top box office draws for most of his career, Wayne only received two Oscar nominations as Best Actor: one for “Sands of Iwo Jima” (1949), another for “True Grit” (1969). The latter, in which he played the drunken, one-eyed Texas Ranger Rooster Cogburn, won him his long-overdue prize, as well as a Golden Globe. He also competed in Best Picture for producing “The Alamo” (1960), which he directed and starred in. He received the Cecil B. DeMille prize in 1966.

Tour our photo gallery of Wayne’s 25 greatest films, including some of the titles listed above, as well as “Red River” (1948), “She Wore a Yellow Ribbon” (1949), “Rio Bravo” (1959) and more.

– Original text and gallery published in May 2019.

Источник: https://www.goldderby.com/gallery/john-wayne-movies-25-greatest-films-ranked-worst-to-best/
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