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solano county health department

Departments. Services. Calendars. Emergencies. Contact Health & Social Services. 275 Beck Avenue Mental Health Managed Care 800-547-0495. The percentage of Intensive Care Unit beds available for use on a specific day in Solano County hospitals. Napa, Lake and Solano counties recommend wearing masks indoors but aren't requiring them. "Just wear a mask," said one store manager. "I don'.

Solano county health department -

AJCC Partners

Partner List

California Indian Manpower Consortium – Provides job training and employment opportunities for low-income, unemployed or underemployed Native American populations. (800) 640-2462, http://www.cimcinc.org

California Department of Rehabilitation – Counseling, training, & job placement for persons with disabilities. (707) 428-2080, as for counselor of the day. www.dor.ca.gov

California Human Development – Counseling, training & job placement for migrant or seasonal farmworkers. (707) 678-5380, www.cahumandevelopment.org

Community Action Partnership – (CAP-Solano) – Strengthens communities by providing transitional and permanent housing, and other safety net services that support low-income families and individuals, homeless families and individuals, migrant or seasonal farm workers and elderly low-income individuals. (707) 428-7749, www.capsolanojpa.org

Employment Development Department – Job search, recruitment assistance, trade adjustment services, & labor market information. www.edd.ca.gov, Vallejo (707) 648-4024, Napa (707) 259-8139

Fairfield-Suisun Adult School – It is evident that improving one's educational skills is an expectation for workplace success. The adult school offers classes/opportunities in meeting educational goals. (707) 421-4155, https://www.fsusd.org/fsas

Job Corps – Career technical training & academic training programs, residential services, job preparation, placement assistance, counseling and support for ages 16 – 24. (415) 937-2611, https://www.jobcorps.gov/

NAPCA – SER Jobs for ProgressProvides local job search assistance to persons aged 55 and over, as well as a paid work experience while developing up to date job skills.Income based, Call (707) 863-3580 for Fairfield (leave message) and (707) 6495488 for Vallejowww.sercalifornia.org

Solano Community College Career and Technical Education (CTE) – The CTE Transitions Program helps high school students navigate a smoother, more efficient pathway from high school to college to careers. (707) 864-7000, extension 4739, http://www.solano.edu/ctetransitions/

Solano County Health & Social Services – Promotes cost-effective services, which safeguard the physical, emotional, & social well being of the people of Solano County. www.mybenefitscalwin.org to begin or call in Vacaville (707) 469-4500; Fairfield (707) 784-8050; Vallejo (707) 553-5000

Vacaville Education Extension Program - Adult education classes & Workplace Training Program. There is a small fee for academic classes. (707) 453-6018, www.vusd.solanocoe.k12.ca.us

Vallejo Regional Education Center GED Prep; Microsoft Office, Healthcare Career programs. ESL and Parenting Education classes. (707) 556-8620 x52204, http://vas-vcusd-ca.schoolloop.com

Workforce Development Board of Solano County – Offers a variety of no-cost services; including employment preparation workshops, job search assistance, and short term pre-vocational training opportunities, and services for Businesses. Fairfield (707) 863-3500, http://www.solanoemployment.org/

Источник: https://www.solanoemployment.org/ajcc-partners

Solano County health director defends decision to not implement indoor mask mandate

SOLANO COUNTY, Calif. (KGO) -- While seven Bay Area counties do have mask mandates going into place Tuesday, August 3, a few do not.

Napa, Lake and Solano counties recommend wearing masks indoors but aren't requiring them.

"Just wear a mask," said one store manager.

"I don't think we still need to wear a mask," said a store patron.

FULL INTERVIEW: Solano Co. health director defends not implementing mask mandate


The back and forth has started between those who believe indoor masking should be mandated for both unvaccinated and vaccinated individuals and those who are against it.

At the Natural Grocery Company in El Cerrito, mask requirement signs will be put out before the store opens on Tuesday.

"Yes we have to go back to the mask-wearing but as I said before hopefully this time around we'll have a better outcome," said Natural Grocery Company store manager Claudia Barajas.

RELATED: Bay Area health officials issue new indoor mask mandate

But that is Contra Costa County where there will be a mandate. In Solano County, there is no mandate, just a recommendation.

"The data doesn't support the need for such a mandate," said Solano County Health Director Dr. Bela Matyas. "This disease in our county is very clearly spreading during and through social events with people who are going to parties, barbecues, picnics, and campouts." Dr. Matyas described some of the transmission events to be "sharing of food, sharing of cigarettes, playing beer pong, activities that are clearly going to transmit the virus very effectively and then there are larger gatherings where people are essentially on top of each other."

Dr. Matyas says indoor public spaces are not where they have seen COVID-19 transmission, therefore he doesn't believe an indoor mask mandate would help.

"I'll use a metaphor, you know we're filling up a tank with gas to fix a flat tire. It's not going to fix the flat tire."

But many we saw in Solano County were wearing masks.

"I'm not vaccinated so I'm going to keep my mask on," said Ranyia Colbert.

RELATED: These 5 Bay Area cities may be 'most at risk' for new COVID-19 infections, data shows

Others made it known why they aren't into the idea and in favor of Solano County decision not to implement a mandate.

"We were already vaccinated and I can't really breathe when I wear a mask so for me it's annoying to wear," said Oriza Evangelista.

Dr. Matyas said Solano County would have a lot fewer COVID-19 cases if people wore a mask to parties and didn't go to a party if they had any signs of being sick.

CDC COVID-19 Transmission Categories by California County


Map not displaying correctly? Click here to open in a new window.

VACCINE TRACKER: How California is doing, when you can get a coronavirus vaccine

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RELATED STORIES & VIDEOS:

Источник: https://abc7news.com/solano-county-mask-mandate-indoor-bay-area/10926480/

Get to know Registered Nurse, Tonya A. Jackson, who serves patients in California.

Tonya is a Public Health Nurse currently working at Solano County Public Health Department located in Fairfield, California. In order to provide her patients with the best care, she specializes in pediatrics and adult primary care.

Solano County Public Health Department prevents the spread of diseases, promotes health, and protects the public from health problems and hazards. Their staff provides services such as conducting public health nurse home visits for moms and babies, providing medical care in their clinics, investigating disease outbreaks, advancing local ordinances to protect residents’ health, and preparing for public health emergencies. Their passion is in promoting healthy, livable communities for Solano residents and community members.

To begin her career, Tonya obtained her nursing degree from Solano Community College in 2007. From there, she attended Touro University California and earned her Master’s in Nursing degree in 2019.

On a more personal note, Tonya attributes her success to her drive and love for helping others. She always knew she wanted to be a nurse.

Learn More about Tonya A. Jackson:
Through her online profile, https://todaysnurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4148117/info/

Источник: https://pressrelease.healthcare/tonya-a-jackson-rn-a-registered-nurse-with-solano-county-public-health-department.html

The Solano County Department of Health and Social Services invites the public to celebrate Halloween and Dia de los Muertos this year while reducing the risk of transmission of COVID-19.

According to a news release, the public is encouraged to celebrate in small gatherings and implement extra safety measures, especially when everyone is not vaccinated.

“Together, we all need to do as much as we can to protect ourselves and those around us, including young children who are not yet eligible for vaccination,” officials wrote.

When it comes to reducing the spread of COVID-19, Halloween is no different than the rest of the year.

General measures to protect against COVID-19:

Get fully vaccinated

  •  “All three currently available vaccines are safe and effectively reduce risk of severe illness, hospitalization, and death due to COVID-19,” county officials wrote.
    For vaccine clinic updates and upcoming vaccine clinics in Solano County, visit www.solanocounty.com/covidvaccine.

Stay home if you have or think you may have COVID-19.

  • Do not attend celebrations or participate in activities if you feel sick, or if you have come into close contact with someone who has COVID-19 and you are not yet fully vaccinated.

Wear a face mask

  • Face masks are recommended in private settings where not everyone has been vaccinated or when around people who are otherwise vulnerable or whose immune systems are compromised.
  • A costume mask is not a substitute for a well-fitted face mask that covers your mouth and nose.
  • Avoid wearing a costume mask over a protective cloth mask because it can be dangerous if the costume mask makes it hard to breathe.

Gather outdoors

  • Indoor activities where people from different households mix, like haunted houses or indoor mazes, are higher risk for everyone—especially for persons not yet vaccinated.

Take safety precautions when trick-or-treating

  • If participating in traditional outdoor trick-or-treating, wear a face mask or keep your distance from others to help reduce your risk of getting COVID-19.
  • Take hand sanitizer with you and use it frequently. Remember to wash your hands after coming home, and especially before eating any treats.

Get a booster or first/second dose of the vaccine:

The mass vaccination clinics at the Vallejo fairgrounds is operating Wednesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Clinics are expected to be operational for a total of eight weeks between Oct. 13 and the middle of December, with closures the week of Nov. 3 to 6 and Nov. 24 to 27 for Thanksgiving.

The clinics are walk-in, or appointment based. To make an appointment at the mass vaccination event, eligible residents can sign up to for their booster or their first/second dose with the available vaccines online at https://vax.phast-vax-ca.org/en-US/.Those requiring registration assistance, call (800) 672-0150.

Homebound individuals interested in requesting an in-home vaccination appointment are encouraged to call the COVID-19 vaccine line at 784-8655 for scheduling assistance. Residents without transportation to and from vaccine sites hosted by Solano County are urged to call the COVID-19 vaccine line at 784-8655 and arrange for a free ride through Uber.

Источник: https://www.thereporter.com/2021/10/28/solano-county-public-health-offers-tips-on-safely-celebrating-halloween

When many people think of the Fourth of July, they think of the colors red, white and blue. Thankfully, they won’t also be seeing purple.

Despite the number of COVID-19 cases doubling since July 4, the Solano County Health Department said no rules are being changed yet on whether or not one should wear a mask for indoor events. This comes as a relief to some, as the county would be in the least restrictive purple tier if it was still following the old tier system used before the state reopened in early June.

As of Wednesday afternoon the county has had 34,761 cases, and its death toll has remained at 245 for about two weeks. However, the 7-day positivity rate has climbed to 11.9 this week. It was at 10.2 a week ago and 13.2 two weeks ago.

While some nearby counties like Alameda, San Francisco, San Mateo, Contra Costa and Santa Clara have recommended wearing masks more indoors due to the Delta Variant, Solano County Health officials like Jayleen Richards said the cause for the spike in cases doesn’t come from the variant, but instead the recent July 4th holiday.

“Solano Public Health will continue to follow the guidance of the California Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,” Richards said. “At this time, both agencies are not recommending a tier system or asking vaccinated people to wear masks indoors. We will continue to follow the guidance provided by these agencies.”

Solano was seeing 15 tp 20 cases per day prior to the July 4th holiday, according to Richards. Between July 7 and July 20, the average daily cases increased to 46 per day. Most of these cases are attributed to the holiday.

“The number of cases in Solano County and across the state and country is disproportionately impacting those who are not vaccinated,” Richards said. “In Solano County, the unvaccinated tends to be a younger population. In Solano County, more than 85 percent of residents 65-74 years of age are vaccinated and nearly 84 percent of residents older than 75 years of age are vaccinated. Older populations are the most at risk for hospitalizations and death due to COVID-19. We are concerned that the number of cases is increasing in Solano County, and we are pleased that the hospital systems are not being stretched thin, due to the increases in the number of cases, as we saw earlier this year.”

With these stats, Solano isn’t recommending yet that it should wear masks inside, but it strongly is recommending for people to get the vaccination.

“Public Health officials and providers urge everyone eligible to get a vaccine,” Richards said. “A person who receives a vaccine is protecting themselves and their loved ones from the disease. Among people who are vaccinated about 10 percent remain susceptible to the virus because they haven’t formed immunity. These people are as susceptible as those who are unvaccinated. Both of these groups being impacted by the Delta Variant of the virus in increasing numbers. The virus has many variants among which the Delta Variant is most easily transmitted. If people continue to wear masks and socially distance their chance of getting COVID is significantly reduced. The likelihood of severe illness seems to be similar for all of the variants.”

The California Department of Public Health  developed a variant tracking page that explains how, which, and why variants are tracked. At the bottom of the webpage, the state provides information on known variants and what proportion of variants have changed over time. The link to the site is www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/COVID-Variants.aspx.

A table on that site says the numbers of specimens that Solano County is aware of. Of the people in Solano County that have the virus, 78 percent of them have the Alpha version, according to that table’s study. Another 14.29 come from the Delta Variant, while 5.84 percent comes from the Gamma and 1.30 percent comes from the Beta.

While Richards and the Solano County Public Health Department are closely monitoring what California Gov. Gavin Newsom says, Solano Public Health has worked closely with the state to provide 16 vaccine clinics at McDonald’s restaurant locations across the county. Two hundred and five people have been vaccinated at these clinics, according to Richards. Solano held the most events at the McDonald’s locations than any other county in the state.

Nationally, many health experts have called on the federal government to change its guidance that the vaccinated don’t need to wear masks again indoors.

But talk of vaccine passports has all but vanished in the months since vaccinations became widely available and infection rates began to plummet as a result. And with Newsom facing a recall election in September driven largely by critics of his handling of the pandemic, there is little appetite for renewed statewide restrictions on businesses and schools.

Related Articles

“We’re very mindful of the Delta Variant,” Newsom said Wednesday, calling a statewide mask order or vaccine passport unnecessary. “The most important thing we can do to get this pandemic behind us is to get vaccinated.”

Last week Vallejo Mayor Robert McConnell urged people to continue wearing masks and asked citizens why they would want to take a chance.

“What’s reality with the statistics is that you’re not likely to contact the variant if vaccinated, but there is still a chance you can,” McConnell said. “If you get it, then possible long-term effects could have an impact on your bodies and your breathing. You don’t want to be that one person. Why increase the chance of being that person? It’s a losing bet.”

— Bay Area News Group reporters John Wolfolk and Rachel Oh contributed to this report.

Источник: https://www.eastbaytimes.com/2021/07/22/despite-increase-in-covid-19-cases-solano-county-not-changing-stance/

AJCC Partners

Partner List

California Indian Manpower Consortium – Provides job training and employment opportunities for low-income, unemployed or underemployed Native American populations. (800) 640-2462, http://www.cimcinc.org

California Department of Rehabilitation – Counseling, training, & job placement for persons with disabilities. (707) 428-2080, as for counselor of the day. www.dor.ca.gov

California Human Development – Counseling, training & job placement for migrant or seasonal farmworkers. (707) 678-5380, www.cahumandevelopment.org

Community Action Partnership – (CAP-Solano) – Strengthens communities by providing transitional and permanent housing, and other safety net services that support low-income families and individuals, homeless families and individuals, migrant or seasonal farm workers and elderly low-income individuals. (707) 428-7749, www.capsolanojpa.org

Employment Development Department – Job search, recruitment assistance, trade adjustment services, & labor market information. www.edd.ca.gov, Vallejo (707) 648-4024, Napa (707) 259-8139

Fairfield-Suisun Adult School – It is evident that improving one's educational skills is an expectation for workplace success. The adult school offers classes/opportunities in meeting educational goals. (707) 421-4155, https://www.fsusd.org/fsas

Job Corps – Career technical training & academic training programs, residential services, job preparation, placement assistance, counseling and support for ages 16 – 24. (415) 937-2611, https://www.jobcorps.gov/

NAPCA – SER Jobs for ProgressProvides local job search assistance to persons my frost online banking at frostbank com 55 and over, as well as a paid work experience while developing up to date job skills.Income based, Call (707) 863-3580 for Fairfield (leave message) and (707) 6495488 for Vallejowww.sercalifornia.org

Solano Community College Career and Technical Education (CTE) – The CTE Transitions Program helps high school students navigate a smoother, more efficient pathway from high school to college to careers. (707) 864-7000, extension 4739, http://www.solano.edu/ctetransitions/

Solano County Health & Social Services – Promotes cost-effective services, which safeguard the physical, emotional, & social well being of the people of Solano County. www.mybenefitscalwin.org to begin or call in Vacaville (707) 469-4500; Fairfield (707) 784-8050; Vallejo (707) 553-5000

Vacaville Education Extension Program - Adult education classes & Workplace Training Program. There is a small fee for academic classes. (707) 453-6018, www.vusd.solanocoe.k12.ca.us

Vallejo Regional Education Center GED Prep; Microsoft Office, Healthcare Career programs. ESL and Parenting Education classes. (707) 556-8620 x52204, http://vas-vcusd-ca.schoolloop.com

Workforce Development Board of Solano County – Offers a variety of no-cost services; including employment preparation workshops, job search assistance, and short term pre-vocational training opportunities, and services for Businesses. Fairfield (707) 863-3500, http://www.solanoemployment.org/

Источник: https://www.solanoemployment.org/ajcc-partners

A seriously ill Solano County resident appears to be the nation’s first case of coronavirus infection from an unknown source, fueling concern that the virus could spread undetected in the general population.

The diagnosis was delayed, potentially exposing others to infection, because a federal test was not promptly conducted when the patient arrived at UC Davis on Wednesday Feb. 19, despite the medical center’s request.  The test was conducted four days later, on Sunday Feb. 23, and results returned on Wednesday Feb. 26.

Unlike other cases, the person did not recently return from a foreign country and is not known to have had contact with a person who was sick or infected, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

Such community transmission is worrisome because a virus is much harder to control once it spreads in offices, schools, medical offices and other public sites. The case differs from others in the U.S., where the infected persons were known travelers who were quickly and safely quarantined, or persons in close contact with those travelers.

The patient was transferred from another Northern California hospital, where healthcare workers also were unaware of the dangerous infection.

The patient is now being treated in the Intensive Care Unit at UC Davis Medical Center, according to infectious disease specialist Dr. Bennett Penn, assistant professor of microbiology at UC Davis.

Health officials are tracking down contacts of the patient, as well as investigating whether the person was unknowingly exposed to a returned traveler who was infected. Solano County is home to Travis Air Force Base, where many travelers have been quarantined.

According to a statement from two UC Davis officials, the test was delayed because the patient did not fit into the CDC’s two criteria: a history of travel to China or close contact with a coronavirus patient.

“Upon admission, our team asked public health officials if this case could be COVID-19,” the name of the respiratory disease, according to a memo to UC Davis medical staff from David Lubarsky, vice-chancellor of human health services, and Brad Simmons, interim CEO of UC Davis Medical Center. “We requested COVID-19 testing by the CDC, since neither Sacramento County nor (the California Department of Public Health) is doing testing for coronavirus at this time.”

“Since the patient did not fit the existing CDC criteria for COVID-19, a test was not immediately administered,” they said. “UC Davis Health does not control the testing process.”

A small number of medical center employees have been asked to stay home and monitor their temperatures, according to the statement.  But “because of precautions we have had in place since this patient’s arrival, we believe there has been minimal potential for exposure here at UC Davis Medical Center,” the email said.

This solano county health department means that the U.S. joins other nations where the virus is appearing without a known source of exposure, such as Hong Kong, Italy, Iran, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Thailand.

“I thought it’d be a while before this happened, but looks like it’s time to buckle up,” Tweeted UC Davis microbiologist Penn.

The news came as President Donald Trump spoke at an evening news conference in which he was optimistic about the administration’s efforts to prevent the spread of the disease, predicting cases would drop “down to zero in a few days” but vowing the U.S. is ready to handle an outbreak, should it come.

There have been two previous instances of person-to-person transmission in the United States — one in San Benito County and the second in Chicago — but both of those cases were after close, prolonged interaction with an infected family member who returned from Wuhan, China.

Not counting infections among passengers of the ill-fated Diamond Princess cruise ship, now quarantined at Travis Air Force Base, California has had seven travel-related cases, one close contact case — and now one community transmission, according to the state Department of Public Health.

Does this mean that the coronavirus outbreak could pose a threat to you and your family?

Yes, no and maybe.

Health officials insist the risk to Americans remains low. Hundreds of people who were airlifted from China to the U.S. last month were given a clean bill of health and allowed to leave quarantine. About 60 people have tested positive — most of them the cruise ship passengers who were brought back to the U.S. from Japan earlier this month.

The vast majority of confirmed cases are considered mild, involving mere cold-like symptoms to mild pneumonia. But the illness can be catastrophic for five percent of patients, particularly the elderly.

To make sense of the fast-moving world of coronavirus science and policy, we’ve collected the latest information from U.S. and global press briefings, virologists and research studies.

Q: Why can’t my doctor diagnose it?

A: The symptoms of coronavirus look a lot like every illness that circulates this time of year. So it’s tough for doctors to make a diagnosis solely on the basis of the symptoms.

The only way to find out is to be tested. The California Department of Public Health’s state laboratory in Richmond is using the CDC’s detection test on people repatriated from overseas who are suspected to be infected, but there have been undisclosed problems with it — and that’s causing a delay. Tests that are positive must be shipped to Atlanta for confirmation.

It’s important to be fast, but it’s more important to be accurate. The CDC is fixing its test and soon will send out solano county health department new version. When commercial tests are available, there will be  greater efficiency.

— California Department of Public Health and Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

Q: If I’m exposed, how long before I develop symptoms?

A:  The period between exposure and symptoms is 5.2 days on average, but varies greatly among patients. A new analysis still supports a 14-day medical observation period for people exposed to the pathogen.

— New England Journal of Medicine

Q: How sick would I get?

A: Across China, about 80% of cases are mild, involving mostly cold-like symptoms to mild pneumonia. Fourteen percent of cases have been “severe,” involving serious pneumonia and shortness of breath. Another 5 percent of patients developed critical respiratory failure, septic shock and organ failure.

Patients 80 years or older are most at risk, with 14.8 percent of them dying. Deaths occurred in every age group except in children under the age of nine.

For people with mild disease, recovery time is about two weeks, while people with severe disease recover within three to six weeks.

— Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Q: Why are some people hit so hard?

A: Experts think it depends on a person’s immune response. It seems to trigger an overproduction of immune cells that flood into the lung, causing pneumonia.

— Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health

Q: How easily does it spread?

A: Each infected person infects an average of 2 to 3.1 other people. That’s higher than the seasonal flu (around 1.3) but much lower than the measles (12 or higher).

— Maia Majumder, Boston Children’s Hospital 

Q: Solano county health department I spread it if I’m not sick?

A: Perhaps. In two patients, German researchers were able to isolate the virus from the nose and throat even before they showed any symptoms or had very mild symptoms.

— New England Journal of Medicine 

Q: Does a mask help or hurt?

A: The CDC does not recommend wearing masks. Health care workers who care for care for patients with coronavirus should take all precautions. So should household members or close contacts of a known or suspected infected person. But in terms of day-to-day interactions, hand washing is far more effective.

A surgical mask is paychex customer service to keep the surgeon’s germs off the patient.

An ‘N95’ respirator mask is better in terms protecting you but can be difficult to fit correctly to the face. If a mask is ill-fitting, the virus can find a way in. If you wear that mask, it should be specially fitted.

— Virologist Dr. Warner C. Greene, professor of medicine, microbiology and immunology at UC San Francisco

Q: Can local hospitals treat patients?

A: Patients who require hospitalization can be cared for in any community hospital that is reasonably well prepared. Almost all hospitals already have trained for a flu pandemic — and should start practicing for coronavirus care now.

— Dr. Eric Toner of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

Q: What are my chances of dying?

A: The death rate — the percentage of known infected people who die — is about 2% in China’s Hubei province, where the virus first started, and 0.7% in other parts of China. The risk of death in those over age 80 is high, at 14%. For children and young people, it is very low.

That is comparable to the death rate of the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic. It’s much higher than the 0.1 percent fatality rate for seasonal flu.  But it’s lower than SARS virus, at 9-10%, and much lower than the MERS outbreak, at 36%.

— Dr. Bruce Aylward, World Health Organization

Q: There are no approved drugs to treat coronavirus. Are any being tested?

A: Yes. Trials already have started. The drug remdesivir, made by Gilead Biosciences of Foster City, is being tested on sick Americans at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. While small, this is a rigorous study; it is ‘blinded,” with some subjects getting the drug and others getting a placebo. It is also being tested in China.

— Dr. Anthony Fauci, National Small business bank of Allergy and Infectious Disease

Q: There’s no vaccine. What’s in the pipeline?

It is likely to be a year or 18 months before the vaccine is widely available. But things are moving quickly.

The company Moderna Therapeutics already has already shipped some doses of an RNA vaccine to the NIH. Those could be given to volunteers in a safety test starting as soon as April.

— Dr. Anthony Fauci, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Disease

Q: What’s happening in China?

A: Astonishingly, the number of new cases is declining, thanks to the country’s aggressive lockdown. The Chinese epidemic peaked between Jan. 23 and Feb. 2.

Fourteen other countries have not reported a new case in more than a week — and even more important, nine countries have not reported a case for more than two weeks.

— Dr. Tedros Ghebreyesus, World Health Organization  

Related Articles

Q: Is it a pandemic?

A: It meets two of three criteria how to delete bankmobile vibe account a pandemic: illness resulting in death and sustained person-to-person spread. It’s moving closer but has not yet met the third criteria: worldwide spread.

— Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

Q: Where did it start? Q: How does it make you sick? Q: Can be become immune? Answers to these questions and more: https://www.mercurynews.com/2020/02/11/coronavirus-the-8-big-questions-that-scientists-are-asking/ 

John Woolfolk contributed to this article.

Источник: https://www.mercurynews.com/2020/02/26/coronavirus-heres-what-the-latest-science-tells-us

Solano County, California

County in California, United States

County in California, United States

Solano County, California

Solano County
Solanocountygovoffice.jpg
CABeniciaCapitol0152.jpg
Vacaville Hills.jpg

Images, from top down, left to right: The Solano County Government Center in Downtown Fairfield, Benicia Capitol State Historic Park, Suisun City Marina, Military C-5 Aircraft based at Travis Air Force Base, Vacaville Hills

Official seal of Solano County, California

Seal

Interactive map of Solano County

Location in the state of California

Location in the state of California

CountryUnited States
StateCalifornia
RegionSan Francisco Bay Area
IncorporatedFebruary 18, 1850[1]
Named forChief Solano of the Suisun people
County seatFairfield
Largest cityVallejo (population)
Fairfield (area)
 • Total906 sq mi (2,350 km2)
 • Land822 sq mi (2,130 km2)
 • Water84 sq mi (220 km2)
Highest elevation

[2]

2,822 ft (860 m)
 • Total413,344
 • Estimate 

(2019)[4]

447,643
 • Density460/sq mi (180/km2)
Time best online checking account interest rates (Pacific Time Zone)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−7 (Pacific Daylight Time)
Area code707
FIPS code06-095
GNIS feature ID277312
Websitewww.solanocounty.com

Solano County is a county located in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2010 census, the population was 413,344.[3] The county seat is Fairfield.[5]

Solano County comprises the Vallejo–Fairfield, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the San Jose–San Francisco–Oakland, CA Combined Statistical Area.[6] Solano County is the northeastern county in the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area region.

A portion of the South Campus at the Coming to america eddie murphy of California, Davis is in Solano County.

History[edit]

Solano County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood.

At the request of General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, the county was named for Chief Solano of the Suisun people, a Native American tribe of the region and Vallejo's close ally. Chief Solano at one time led the tribes between the Petaluma River and the Sacramento River. The chief was also called Sem-Yeto, which signifies "brave or fierce hand." The Chief was given the Spanish name Francisco Solano during baptism at the Catholic Mission, and is named after the Spanish Franciscanmissionary, Father Francisco Solano. "Solano" is a common surname in the north of Spain, especially in Navarra, Zaragoza and La Rioja.

Travis Air Force Base is located just east of Fairfield.

Region[edit]

Solano County is the easternmost county of the North Bay.[6] As such, it is sometimes reported by news agencies as being in the East Bay.[7][8][9] Additionally, a best open source accounting software for small business of the county extends into the Sacramento Valley, geographically.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 906 square miles (2,350 km2), of which 822 square miles (2,130 km2) is land and 84 square miles (220 km2), comprising 9.3%, is water.[10]

Solano County has several inactive cinnabar mines, including the Hastings Mine and St. John's Mine,[11] both of which are subject to ongoing mercury monitoring. These mines were worked in the first half of the twentieth century.

Flora and fauna[edit]

Solano County has a number of rare and endangered species, including the beetleElaphrus viridis, the wildflowerLasthenia conjugens, commonly known as Contra Costa goldfields and the annual plant Legenere limosa or False Venus' looking glass.

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Transportation[edit]

See also: Rail transportation in Solano County, California

Major highways[edit]

Public transportation[edit]

Solano County is served by several transit agencies:

Each agency interconnects with the others, enabling transit trips throughout the county. Service also connects with BART stations in Contra Costa County. Transit links are provided to Napa, Yolo and Sacramento counties as well.

Greyhound and Amtrak provide long-distance intercity service.

Airports[edit]

General aviation airports in Solano County which are open to the public are the Nut Tree Airport and Rio Vista Municipal Airport.

Crime[edit]

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

Cities by population and crime rates[edit]

Cities by population and crime rates
City Population[14]Violent crimes[14]Violent crime telephone number for advance auto parts 1,000 persons Property crimes[14]Property crime rate
per 1,000 persons
Benicia27,459371.3539014.20
Dixon18,708532.8331516.84
Fairfield107,1104544.243,31730.97
Rio Vista7,485395.2114519.37
Suisun City28,593571.9955819.52
Vacaville93,9512462.622,03121.62
Vallejo117,9128787.455,84449.56

Demographics[edit]

A 2014 analysis by The Atlantic found Solano County to be the 5th most racially diverse county in the United States, behind Aleutians West Census Area and Aleutians East Borough in Alaska, Queens County in New York, and Alameda County in California.[15]

2011[edit]

Population, race, and income
Total population[12]411,620
  White[12]214,436 52.1%
  Black or African American[12]60,130 14.6%
  American Indian or Alaska Native[12]2,427 0.6%
  Asian[12]59,143 14.4%
  Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander[12]3,390 0.8%
  Some other race[12]43,064 10.5%
  Two or more races[12]29,030 7.1%
 Hispanic or Latino (of any race)[16]97,268 23.6%
Per capita income[17]$29,367
Median household income[18]$69,914
Median family income[19]$79,316

Places by population, race, and income[edit]

Places by population and race
Place Type[20]Population[12]White[12]Other[12]
[note 2]
Asian[12]Black or African
American[12]
Native American[12]
[note 3]
Hispanic or Latino
(of any race)[16]
AllendaleCDP1,96886.1%10.7%3.2%0.0%0.0%14.7%
BeniciaCity26,98175.6%10.4%9.3%3.1%1.7%12.2%
DixonCity18,14174.9%17.0%3.8%3.0%1.3%39.4%
ElmiraCDP25197.2%2.8%0.0%0.0%0.0%2.8%
FairfieldCity104,40447.1%19.4%15.5%16.6%1.5%25.7%
Green ValleyCDP1,71985.7%8.7%2.4%3.1%0.0%8.0%
HartleyCDP2,22985.3%4.4%1.7%7.3%1.3%12.7%
Rio VistaCity7,08876.5%10.0%4.0%7.9%1.5%14.9%
Suisun CityCity27,90034.4%24.9%19.9%19.7%1.1%25.6%
VacavilleCity92,21764.8%17.0%5.9%11.1%1.2%21.7%
VallejoCity116,02136.2%17.2%23.9%21.0%1.6%23.3%
Places by population and income
Place Type[20]Population[21]Per capita income[17]Median household income[18]Median family income[19]
AllendaleCDP1,968$41,928$112,837$119,063
BeniciaCity26,981$41,854$90,338$102,571
DixonCity18,141$27,624$72,626$76,038
ElmiraCDP251$22,069$73,438$85,650
FairfieldCity104,404$26,785$68,037$75,717
Green Valley (Solano County)CDP1,719$67,828$125,669$145,781
HartleyCDP2,229$41,041$87,841$106,786
Rio VistaCity7,088$34,332$58,701$68,156
Suisun CityCity27,900$26,148$71,411$76,286
VacavilleCity92,217$29,687$73,302$85,790
VallejoCity116,021$27,375$62,325$72,717

2010[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850580
18607,1691,136.0%
187016,871135.3%
188018,4759.5%
189020,94613.4%
190024,14315.3%
191027,55914.1%
192040,60247.3%
193040,8340.6%
194049,11820.3%
1950104,833113.4%
1960134,59728.4%
1970169,94126.3%
1980235,20338.4%
1990340,42144.7%
2000394,54215.9%
2010413,3444.8%
2019 (est.)447,643[4]8.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[22]
1790-1960[23] 1900-1990[24]
1990-2000[25] 2010-2015[3]

The 2010 United States Census reported that Solano County had a population of 413,344. The racial makeup of Solano County was 210,751 (51.0%) White, 60,750 (14.7%) African American, 3,212 (0.8%) Native American, 60,473 (14.6%) Asian, 3,564 (0.9%) Pacific Islander, 43,236 (10.5%) from other obx weekend house rentals, and 31,358 (7.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 99,356 persons (24.0%).[26] At 52,641 Filipinos in the county making up 12% of the population, Solano County has the largest percentage Filipino population of any county in the United States.[citation needed]

Population racial makeup reported at 2010 United States Census
County
Total
population
White
African
American
Native
American
Asian
Pacific
Islander
Other
races
Two or
more races
Hispanic
or Latino
(of any race)
Solano County413,344210,75160,7503,21260,4733,56443,23631,35899,356
Incorporated
cities and towns
Total
population
White
African
American
Native
American
Asian
Pacific
Islander
Other
races
Two or
more races
Hispanic
or Latino
(of any race)
Benicia26,99719,5681,5101352,9891028951,7983,248
Dixon18,35113,023562184671582,8381,0157,426
Fairfield105,32148,40716,58686915,7001,14913,3019,30928,789
Rio Vista7,3606,0033725335915288270914
Suisun City28,11110,8055,7131965,3483402,8982,8116,753
Vacaville92,42861,3019,5108465,6065328,1366,49721,121
Vallejo115,94238,06425,57275728,8951,23912,7598,65626,165
Census-designated
places
Total
population
White
African
American
Native
American
Asian
Pacific
Islander
Other
races
Two or
more races
Hispanic
or Latino
(of any race)
Allendale1,5061,23949224227973235
Elmira1881501102017847
Green Valley1,6251,4124168292055121
Hartley2,5101,95670247016248126510
Other
unincorporated areas
Total
population
White
African
American
Native
American
Asian
Pacific
Islander
Other
races
Two or
more races
Hispanic
or Latino
(of any race)
All others not CDPs (combined) 13,0058,8237641107091021,7577404,027

2000[edit]

At the 2000 census there were 394,542 people, 130,403 households, and 97,411 families in the county. The population density was 476 people per square mile (184/km2). There were 134,513 housing units at an average density of 162 per square mile (63/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 56.4% White, 14.9% Black or African American, 0.8% Native American, 12.8% Asian, 0.8% Pacific Islander, 8.0% from other races, and 6.4% from two or more races. 17.64% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 8.5% were of German, 6.4% Irish and 6.0% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 75.7% spoke English, 12.1% Spanish and 6.6% Tagalog as their first language.[27] Of the 130,403 households 39.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.7% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.3% were non-families. 19.6% of households were one person and 6.5% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.33.

The age distribution was 28.3% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 31.3% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.5% 65 or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 101.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.2 males.

The median household income was $54,099 and the median solano county health department income was $60,597. Males had a median income of $41,787 versus $31,916 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,731. About 6.1% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.3% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.

Government and politics[edit]

Government[edit]

Main article: Government of Solano County, California

The Government of Solano County is defined and authorized under the California Constitution and law as a general law county. The County government provides countywide services such as elections and voter registration, law enforcement, jails, vital records, property records, tax collection, public health, and social services. In addition the County serves as the local government for all unincorporated areas.

The County government is composed of the elected five-member Board of Supervisors, several other elected offices including the Sheriff-Coroner, District Attorney, Assessor/Recorder, Auditor-Controller, and Treasurer/Tax Collector/County Clerk, and numerous county departments and entities under the supervision of the County Administrator. As of January 2013 the members of the Solano County Board of Supervisors were:

  • Erin Hannigan, District 1, Vice-Chairwoman
  • Monica Brown, District 2
  • Jim Spering, District 3
  • John Vasquez, District 4, Chairman
  • Mitch Mashburn, District 5

Politics[edit]

Voter registration statistics[edit]

Overview[edit]

Since 1932, Solano County has been a Democratic stronghold in presidential and congressional elections, with Californians Richard Nixon in 1972 and Ronald Reagan in 1980 and 1984 being the only Republicans to win the county since.

Presidential election results

Year GOPDEMOthers
202033.5% 69,30663.6%131,6392.8% 5,886
201630.8% 51,92060.8%102,3608.2% 13,870
201234.0% 52,09263.3%96,7832.5% 3,965
200834.6% 56,03563.1%102,0952.1% 3,458
200441.8% 62,30157.1%85,0960.9% 1,440
200039.1% 51,60457.0%75,1163.8% 5,015
199634.7% 40,74255.1%64,64410.1% 11,893
199229.4% 38,88348.6%64,32021.8% 28,908
198847.4% 50,31451.2%54,3441.3% 1,430
198454.5%51,67844.2% 41,9821.2% 1,138
198050.7%40,91938.3% 30,95210.9% 8,805
197642.4% 26,13654.6%33,6822.9% 1,826
197254.0%31,31442.7% 24,7663.2% 1,885
196834.7% 17,68353.5%27,27111.7% 5,998
196430.3% 15,26369.5%34,9300.0% 47
196040.8% 18,75158.8%26,9770.3% 141
195641.6% 17,86558.1%24,9030.2% 95
195242.3% 19,36957.1%26,1300.4% 216
194833.7% 12,34563.5%23,2572.7% 1,022
194429.7% 10,36169.9%24,3350.3% 105
194028.5% 6,08170.5%15,0540.9% 193
193620.8% 3,60378.0%13,4591.0% 182
193230.3% 4,38267.1%9,7122.5% 367
192852.3%7,06146.5% 6,2781.1% 158
192448.0%4,7829.6% 95742.3% 4,223
192064.7%7,10226.9% 2,9548.2% 909
191636.3% 3,53658.3%5,6785.2% 514
19120.5% 4045.6%3,65053.8% 4,303[note 5]
190854.7%3,11535.7% 2,0339.5% 545
190461.3%3,17630.0% 1,5558.5% 444
190055.3%3,11440.2% 2,2624.4% 249
189653.1%2,70244.9% 2,2841.8% 94
189249.2%2,40344.5% 2,1746.2% 306
188849.6%2,23148.0% 2,1582.2% 103
188453.6%2,38244.5% 1,9771.8% 84
188049.8%1,96349.7% 1,9590.5% 20

Solano County is split between California's 3rd and 5th congressional districts, represented by John Garamendi (D–Walnut Grove) and Mike Thompson (D–St. Helena), respectively.[30]

In the California State Assembly, Solano County is split between the 4th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, and the 11th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Jim Frazier. In the California State Senate, it is in the 3rd Senate District, represented by Democrat Bill Dodd.[31]

On November 4, 2008, Solano County voted 55.82% in favor of Proposition 8, which amended the California Constitution to ban same-sex marriages. It was the only Bay Area county to approve the initiative.[32] In the 2008 presidential election that day, Barack Obama carried the county by a 28.5% margin over John McCain, a larger margin than statewide (24%).[33]

According to the California Secretary of Solano county health department, as of February 10, 2019, Solano County has 236,028 registered voters. Of those, 106,452 (45.1%) are registered Democrats, 50,006 (21.2%) are registered Republicans, and 66,558 (28.2%) have declined to state a political party.[34] Democrats hold voter-registration advantages in all incorporated cities and towns in Solano County. However, Republicans lead in registration in the unincorporated communities of the county (40%-35%), making Solano the only county in the Bay Area where Republicans out-number Democrats in unincorporated communities. The Democrats' largest registration advantage in Solano is in the city of Vallejo, wherein there are only 8,242 Republicans (14.6%) out of 56,313 total voters compared to 33,753 Democrats (59.9%) and 12,157 voters who have declined to state a political party (21.6%).

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Other unincorporated communities[edit]

Population ranking[edit]

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2020 census of Solano County.[35]

county seat

Rank Settlement Municipal type Population (2020 census)
1 VallejoCity 126,090
2 FairfieldCity 119,881
3 VacavilleCity 102,386
4 Suisun CityCity 29,518
5 BeniciaCity 27,131
6 DixonCity 18,988
7 Rio VistaCity 10,005
8 HartleyCDP 2,430
9 Green ValleyCDP 1,654
10 AllendaleCDP 1,651
11 ElmiraCDP 193

Miscellania[edit]

  • In 1985 Humphrey the humpback whale strayed off his migration route and ended up in Solano county health department Slough north of Rio Vista. Rescuers from the Marine Mammal Center and other volunteers dismantled a county bridge before being able to turn him around in the narrow slough.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.
  2. ^Other = Some other race + Two or more races
  3. ^Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native
  4. ^ abPercentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.
  5. ^This total comprised 3,353 votes for ProgressiveTheodore Roosevelt (who was official Republican nominee in California), 781 votes for SocialistEugene V. Debs and 169 votes for Prohibition Party nominee Eugene W. Chafin.

References[edit]

  1. ^"Chronology". California State Association of Counties. Retrieved February 6, 2015.
  2. ^"Mount Vaca". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved April 8, 2015.
  3. ^ abc"State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 6, 2016.
  4. ^ ab"American FactFinder". Archived from the original on February 14, 2020. Retrieved April 19, 2019.
  5. ^"Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  6. ^ abLandis, John D.; Reilly, Michael (2003). "How We Will Grow: Baseline Projections of California's Urban Footprint Through the Year 2011". In Guhathakurta, Subhrajit (ed.). Integrated Land Use and Environmental Models: A Survey of Current Applications and Research. Springer. p. 84. ISBN . Retrieved March 14, 2012.
  7. ^Alston, John (April 18, 2008). "Solano County's unemployment rate soars to 6.4 percent". abc7news.com. Archived from the original on August 1, 2013. Retrieved March 14, 2012.
  8. ^Walters, Dan (March 29, 1986). "East Bay is a Socioeconomic Dichotomy". Lodi News-Sentinel. p. 12. Retrieved March 14, 2012.
  9. ^"Bay Area median home price falls below $500,000". San Francisco Business Times. July 17, 2008. Retrieved March 14, 2012.
  10. ^"US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  11. ^Hogan, C. Michael; Papineau, Marc (September 1989). "Environmental Assessment of the Columbus Parkway Widening between Ascot Parkway and the Northgate Development, Vallejo". Earth Metrics Inc. Report 7853. California State Clearinghouse.
  12. ^ abcdefghijklmnopqU.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  13. ^ abcdefghijOffice of the Attorney General, Department of Justice, State of California. Table 11: Crimes – 2009Archived 2013-12-02 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  14. ^ abcUnited States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2012, Table 8 (California). Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  15. ^Narula, Svati Kirsten (April 29, 2014). "The 5 U.S. Counties Where Racial Diversity Is Highest—and Lowest". The Atlantic. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  16. ^ abU.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  17. ^ abU.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  18. ^ abU.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  19. ^ abU.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  20. ^ abU.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  21. ^U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  22. ^"U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
  23. ^"Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
  24. ^"Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
  25. ^"Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000"(PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
  26. ^"2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data". United States Census Bureau.
  27. ^"U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  28. ^ abcdefghijklmnopqCalifornia Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 - Report of RegistrationArchived July 27, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 2013-10-31.
  29. ^Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved September 5, 2018.
  30. ^"California's 3rd Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  31. ^"Statewide Database". UC Regents. Archived from the original on February 1, 2015. Retrieved December 4, 2014.
  32. ^https://elections.cdn.sos.ca.gov/sov/2008-general/ssov/10-ballot-measures-statewide-summary-by-county.pdf
  33. ^Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". www.uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved October 2, 2016.
  34. ^CA Secretary of State – Report of Registration – February 10, 2019Archived March 23, 2019, at the Wayback Machine
  35. ^"Explore Census Data". United States Census Bureau. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 28, 2021.

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solano_County,_California

When many people think of the Fourth of July, they think of the colors red, white and blue. Thankfully, they won’t also be seeing purple.

Despite the number of COVID-19 cases doubling since July 4, the Solano County Health Department said no rules are being changed yet on whether or not one should wear a mask for indoor events. This comes as a relief to some, as the county would be in the least restrictive purple tier if it was still following the old tier system used before the state reopened in early June.

As of Wednesday afternoon the county has had 34,761 cases, and its death toll has remained at 245 for paychex customer service two weeks. However, the 7-day positivity rate has climbed to 11.9 this week. It was at 10.2 a week ago and 13.2 two weeks ago.

While some nearby counties like Alameda, San Francisco, San Mateo, Contra Costa and Santa Clara have recommended wearing masks more indoors due to the Delta Variant, Solano County Health officials like Jayleen Richards said the cause for the spike in cases doesn’t come from the variant, but instead the recent July 4th holiday.

“Solano Public Health will continue to follow the guidance of the California Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,” Richards said. “At this time, both agencies are not recommending a tier system or asking vaccinated people to wear masks indoors. We will continue to follow the guidance provided by these agencies.”

Solano was seeing 15 tp 20 cases per day prior to the July 4th holiday, according to Richards. Between July 7 and July 20, the average daily cases increased to 46 per day. Most of these cases are attributed to the holiday.

“The number of cases in Solano County and across the state and country is disproportionately impacting those who are not vaccinated,” Richards said. “In Solano County, the unvaccinated tends to be a younger population. In Solano County, more than 85 percent of residents 65-74 years of age are vaccinated and nearly 84 percent of residents older than 75 years of age are vaccinated. Older populations are the most at risk for hospitalizations and solano county health department due to COVID-19. We are concerned that the number of cases is increasing in Solano County, and we are pleased that the hospital systems are not being stretched thin, due to the increases in the number of cases, as we saw earlier this year.”

With these stats, Solano isn’t recommending yet that it should wear masks inside, but it strongly is recommending for people to get the vaccination.

“Public Health officials and providers urge everyone eligible to get a vaccine,” Richards said. “A person who receives a vaccine is protecting themselves and their loved ones from the disease. Among people who are vaccinated about 10 percent remain susceptible to the virus because they haven’t formed immunity. These people are as susceptible as those who are unvaccinated. Both of these groups being impacted by the Delta Variant of the virus in increasing numbers. The virus has many variants among which the Delta Variant is most easily transmitted. If people continue to wear masks and socially distance their chance solano county health department getting COVID is significantly reduced. The likelihood of severe illness seems to be similar for all of the variants.”

The California Department of Public Health  developed a variant tracking page that explains how, which, and why variants are tracked. At the bottom of the webpage, the state provides information on known variants and what proportion of variants have changed over time. The link to the site is www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/COVID-Variants.aspx.

A table on that site says the numbers of specimens that Solano County is aware of. Of the people in Solano County that have the virus, 78 percent of them have the Alpha version, according to that table’s study. Another 14.29 come from the Delta Variant, while 5.84 percent comes from the Gamma and 1.30 percent comes from the Beta.

While Richards and the Solano County Public Health Department are closely monitoring what California Gov. Gavin Newsom says, Solano Public Health has worked closely with the state to provide 16 vaccine clinics at McDonald’s restaurant locations across the county. Two hundred and five people have been vaccinated at these clinics, according to Richards. Solano held the most events at the McDonald’s locations than any other county in the state.

Nationally, many health experts have called on the federal government to change its guidance that the vaccinated don’t need to wear masks again indoors.

But talk of vaccine passports has all but vanished in the months since vaccinations td bank coney island brooklyn widely available and infection rates began to plummet as a result. And with Newsom facing a recall election in September driven largely by critics of his handling of the pandemic, there is little appetite for renewed statewide restrictions on businesses and schools.

Related Articles

“We’re very mindful of the Delta Variant,” Newsom said Wednesday, calling a statewide mask order or vaccine passport unnecessary. “The most important thing we can do to get this pandemic behind us is to get vaccinated.”

Last week Vallejo Mayor Robert McConnell urged people to continue wearing masks and asked citizens why they would want to take a chance.

“What’s reality with the statistics is that you’re not likely to contact the variant if vaccinated, but there is still a chance you can,” McConnell said. “If you get it, then possible long-term effects could have an impact on your bodies and your breathing. You don’t want to be that one person. Why increase the chance of being that person? It’s a losing bet.”

— Bay Area News Group reporters John Wolfolk and Rachel Oh contributed to this report.

Источник: https://www.eastbaytimes.com/2021/07/22/despite-increase-in-covid-19-cases-solano-county-not-changing-stance/

COVID Vaccines: Solano County Officials Approve Plans For Mass Vaccination Site At Fairgrounds In Vallejo

Filed Under:Coronavirus, Coronavirus Vaccine, COVID-19, COVID-19 Vaccine, Kaiser Family Foundation, Solano County, Sutter Health, Touro University, Vallejo, Vallejo News

VALLEJO (BCN) – The Solano County Board of Supervisors approved a memorandum of understanding Tuesday with the Kaiser Family Foundation and several other partner organizations to operate a COVID-19 vaccination site at the county fairgrounds in Vallejo.

The MOU with the KFF, NorthBay Healthcare, Sutter Health Solano and Touro University would establish the vaccination site for a 90-day term, with the option of extending it for subsequent 90-day terms.

READ MORE: Police Officers Denied Service At San Francisco Restaurant Triggering Negative Reviews, Social Media Backlash

The clinic would administer vaccine doses for up to 12 hours per day, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., seven days per week, according to the county.

Several single-day vaccination clinics have already been held at the fairgrounds as the county progresses through vaccinating residents aged 65 and older, health care workers, food and agriculture workers and education and child care workers.

Similar clinics are expected to be held March 11-14.

READ MORE: SF Civic Center BART Station Reopens After 2-Hour Closure Sunday Morning

Each partner organization involved in the MOU must approve it before officials with the county and the KFF can proceed with the initial 90-day term, according to county officials.

Solano County residents can find information on the county’s COVID-19 vaccination distribution at https://www.solanocounty.com/depts/ph/coronavirus_links/covid_19_vaccines.asp.

As of Monday, 72,500 county residents had received at least one dose of the vaccine, according to the Solano County Public Health Department.

MORE NEWS: Bob Dole Dead at 98

© Copyright 2020 CBS Broadcasting Inc. and Bay City News Service. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Источник: https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2021/03/09/solano-county-covid-vaccination-site-vallejo-fairgrounds/

The Solano County Department of Health and Social Services invites the public to celebrate Halloween and Dia de los Muertos this year while reducing the risk of transmission of COVID-19.

According to a news release, the public is encouraged to celebrate in small gatherings and implement extra safety measures, especially when everyone is not chase bank beverly hills hours, we all need to do as much as we can to protect ourselves and those around us, including young children who are not yet eligible for vaccination,” officials wrote.

When it comes to reducing the spread of COVID-19, Halloween is no different than the rest of the year.

General measures to protect against COVID-19:

Get fully vaccinated

  •  “All three currently available vaccines are safe and effectively reduce risk of severe illness, hospitalization, and death due to COVID-19,” county officials wrote.
    For vaccine clinic updates and upcoming vaccine clinics in Solano County, visit www.solanocounty.com/covidvaccine.

Stay home if you have or think you may have COVID-19.

  • Do not attend celebrations or participate in activities if you feel sick, or if you have come into close contact with someone who has COVID-19 and you are not yet fully vaccinated.

Wear a face mask

  • Face masks are recommended in private settings where not everyone has been vaccinated or when around people who are otherwise vulnerable or whose immune systems are compromised.
  • A costume mask is not a substitute for a well-fitted face mask that covers your mouth and nose.
  • Avoid wearing a costume mask over a protective cloth mask because it can be dangerous if the costume mask makes it solano county health department to breathe.

Gather outdoors

  • Indoor activities where people from different households mix, like haunted houses or indoor mazes, are higher risk for everyone—especially for persons not yet vaccinated.

Take safety precautions when trick-or-treating

  • If participating in traditional outdoor trick-or-treating, wear a face mask or keep your distance from others to help reduce your risk of getting COVID-19.
  • Take hand sanitizer with you and use it frequently. Remember to wash your hands after coming home, and especially before eating any treats.

Get a booster or first/second dose of the vaccine:

The mass vaccination clinics at the Vallejo fairgrounds is operating Wednesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Clinics are expected to be operational for a total of eight weeks between Oct. 13 and the middle of December, with closures the week of Nov. 3 to 6 and Nov. 24 to 27 for Thanksgiving.

The clinics are walk-in, or appointment based. To make an appointment at the mass vaccination event, eligible residents can sign up to for their booster or their first/second dose with the available vaccines online at https://vax.phast-vax-ca.org/en-US/.Those requiring registration assistance, call (800) 672-0150.

Homebound individuals interested in requesting an in-home vaccination appointment are encouraged to call the COVID-19 vaccine line at 784-8655 for scheduling assistance. Residents without transportation to and from vaccine sites hosted by Solano County are urged to call the COVID-19 vaccine line at 784-8655 and arrange for a free ride through Uber.

Источник: https://www.thereporter.com/2021/10/28/solano-county-public-health-offers-tips-on-safely-celebrating-halloween

Get to know Registered Nurse, Tonya A. Jackson, who serves patients in California.

Tonya is a Public Health Nurse currently working at Solano County Public Health Department located in Fairfield, California. In order to provide her patients with the best care, she specializes in pediatrics and adult primary care.

Solano County Public Health Department prevents the spread of diseases, promotes health, and protects the public from health problems and hazards. Their staff provides services such as conducting public health nurse home visits for moms and babies, providing medical care in their clinics, investigating disease outbreaks, advancing local ordinances to protect residents’ health, and preparing for public health emergencies. Their passion is in promoting healthy, livable communities for Solano residents and community members.

To begin her career, Tonya obtained her nursing degree from Solano Community College in 2007. From there, she attended Touro University California and earned her Master’s in Nursing degree in 2019.

On a more personal note, Tonya attributes her success to her drive and love for helping others. She always knew she wanted to be a nurse.

Learn More about Tonya A. Jackson:
Through her online profile, https://todaysnurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4148117/info/

Источник: https://pressrelease.healthcare/tonya-a-jackson-rn-a-registered-nurse-with-solano-county-public-health-department.html

: Solano county health department

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Solano County Public Health Department will be hosting a mass vaccination clinic that will include vaccination shots as well as boosters starting Wednesday at the Solano County Fairgrounds.

The clinic will be put together by the Solano County Department of Health and Social Services, Public Health Division — in collaboration with California Health Medical Reserve Corps (CHMRC), Hammond Group, Kaiser Permanente, NorthBay Medical Center, Medic Ambulance, Solano County Emergency Medical Services, Solano County Fairgrounds, Solano Hearts and Touro University California.

“Booster shots offer additional protection for those who are immunocompromised or are at a higher risk for complications due to COVID-19”, says Bela Matyas, M.D., M.P.H., Solano County Health Officer in a news release. “Those who are 65 years and older, residents of long-term care facilities, or are included in the CDC definition of medical conditions are strongly encouraged to get the booster shot to protect themselves, their families, and the community.”

Booster shots will be provided to individuals who have received their initial Pfizer vaccination at least six months ago and are eligible, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines.

“We are focusing more on the booster shot for this clinic, but of course, if people want to come and get the first and second shots of the vaccine they are more than welcome to,” Solano County Public Health Administrator Jayleen Richards told the Times-Herald on Tuesday.

Solano County is currently at 67 percent fully vaccinated, with 78 percent of the population having had at least one vaccination shot, according to Richards. Richards also said that Vallejo is at 82.5 percent vaccinated — third in the county behind Benicia (84.3) and Rio Vista, which leads with 88.9 percent. Vacaville is only 70 percent vaccinated.

The clinics will operate Wednesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Clinics are expected to be operational for a total of eight weeks between Oct. 13 and the middle of December, with closures the week of November 3 — 6 and November 24 – 27 for the Thanksgiving Holiday.

To make an appointment at the vaccination clinic, eligible residents can sign up to for their Pfizer booster or their first/second dose with the Pfizer vaccine online at https://vax.phast-vax-ca.org/en-US/.

Those requiring registration assistance, can call (800) 672-0150. The clinic hopes to add Moderna and Johnson & Johnson (J&J/Janssen) for first/second dose vaccination soon.

Homebound individuals interested in requesting an in-home vaccination appointment are encouraged to call the COVID-19 vaccine line at (707) 784-8655 for scheduling assistance. Residents without transportation to and from vaccine sites hosted by Solano County are urged to call the COVID-19 vaccine line at (707) 784-8655 and arrange for a free ride through Uber.

For vaccine clinic updates and upcoming vaccine clinics in Solano County, visit www.solanocounty.com/covidvaccine. For vaccine clinics available throughout the State, visit www.myturn.ca.gov or www.vaccines.gov.

For the most recent local COVID-19 health information, including the number of COVID-19 cases in Solano County as reflected on the COVID-19 dashboard, visit www.SolanoCounty.com/COVID19 and on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/SolanoCountyPH (@SolanoCountyPH).

Источник: https://www.timesheraldonline.com/2021/10/12/solano-county-fairgrounds-hosting-clinic-for-eight-weeks-starting-wednesday

AJCC Partners

Partner List

California Indian Manpower Consortium – Provides job training and employment opportunities for low-income, unemployed or underemployed Native American populations. (800) 640-2462, http://www.cimcinc.org

California Department of Rehabilitation – Counseling, training, & job placement for persons with disabilities. (707) 428-2080, as for counselor of the day. www.dor.ca.gov

California Human Development – Counseling, training & job placement for migrant or seasonal farmworkers. (707) 678-5380, www.cahumandevelopment.org

Community Action Partnership – (CAP-Solano) – Strengthens communities by providing transitional and permanent housing, and other safety net services that support low-income families and individuals, homeless families and individuals, migrant or seasonal farm workers and elderly low-income individuals. (707) 428-7749, www.capsolanojpa.org

Employment Development Department – Job search, recruitment assistance, trade adjustment services, & labor market information. www.edd.ca.gov, Vallejo (707) 648-4024, Napa (707) 259-8139

Fairfield-Suisun Adult School – It is evident that improving one's educational skills is an expectation for workplace success. The adult school offers classes/opportunities in meeting educational goals. (707) 421-4155, https://www.fsusd.org/fsas

Job Corps – Career technical training & academic training programs, residential services, job preparation, placement assistance, counseling and support for ages 16 – 24. (415) 937-2611, https://www.jobcorps.gov/

NAPCA – SER Jobs for ProgressProvides local job search assistance to persons aged 55 and over, as well as a paid work experience while developing up to date job skills.Income based, Call (707) 863-3580 for Fairfield (leave message) and (707) 6495488 for Vallejowww.sercalifornia.org

Solano Community College Career and Technical Education (CTE) – The CTE Transitions Program helps high school students navigate a smoother, more efficient pathway from high school to college to careers. (707) 864-7000, extension 4739, http://www.solano.edu/ctetransitions/

Solano County Health & Social Services – Promotes cost-effective services, which safeguard the physical, emotional, & social well being of the people of Solano County. www.mybenefitscalwin.org to begin or call in Vacaville (707) 469-4500; Fairfield (707) 784-8050; Vallejo (707) 553-5000

Vacaville Education Extension Program - Adult education classes & Workplace Training Program. There is a small fee for academic classes. (707) 453-6018, www.vusd.solanocoe.k12.ca.us

Vallejo Regional Education Center GED Prep; Microsoft Office, Healthcare Career programs. ESL and Parenting Education classes. (707) 556-8620 x52204, http://vas-vcusd-ca.schoolloop.com

Workforce Development Board of Solano County – Offers a variety of no-cost services; including employment preparation workshops, job search assistance, and short term pre-vocational training opportunities, and services for Businesses. Fairfield (707) 863-3500, http://www.solanoemployment.org/

Источник: https://www.solanoemployment.org/ajcc-partners

Solano County health director defends decision to not implement indoor mask mandate

SOLANO COUNTY, Calif. (KGO) -- While seven Bay Area counties do have mask mandates going into place Tuesday, August 3, a few do not.

Napa, Lake and Solano counties recommend wearing masks indoors but aren't requiring them.

"Just wear a mask," said one store manager.

"I don't think we still need to wear a mask," said a store patron.

FULL INTERVIEW: Solano Co. health director defends not implementing mask mandate


The back and forth has started between those who believe indoor masking should be mandated for both unvaccinated and vaccinated individuals and those who are against it.

At the Natural Grocery Company in El Cerrito, mask requirement signs will be put out before the store opens on Tuesday.

"Yes we have to go back to the mask-wearing but as I said before hopefully this time around we'll have a better outcome," said Natural Grocery Company store manager Claudia Barajas.

RELATED: Bay Area health officials issue new indoor mask mandate

But that is Contra Costa County where there will be a mandate. In Solano County, there is no mandate, just a recommendation.

"The data doesn't support the need for such a mandate," said Solano County Health Director Dr. Bela Matyas. "This disease in our county is very clearly spreading during and through social events with people who are going to parties, barbecues, picnics, and campouts." Dr. Matyas described some of the transmission events to be "sharing of food, sharing of cigarettes, playing beer pong, activities that are clearly going to transmit the virus very effectively and then there are larger gatherings where people are essentially on top of each other."

Dr. Matyas says indoor public spaces are not where they have seen COVID-19 transmission, therefore he doesn't believe an indoor mask mandate would help.

"I'll use a metaphor, you know we're filling up a tank with gas to fix a flat tire. It's not going to fix the flat tire."

But many we saw in Solano County were wearing masks.

"I'm not vaccinated so I'm going to keep my mask on," said Ranyia Colbert.

RELATED: These 5 Bay Area cities may be 'most at risk' for new COVID-19 infections, data shows

Others made it known why they aren't into the idea and in favor of Solano County decision not to implement a mandate.

"We were already vaccinated and I can't really breathe when I wear a mask so for me it's annoying to wear," said Oriza Evangelista.

Dr. Matyas said Solano County would have a lot fewer COVID-19 cases if people wore a mask to parties and didn't go to a party if they had any signs of being sick.

CDC COVID-19 Transmission Categories by California County


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VACCINE TRACKER: How California is doing, when you can get a coronavirus vaccine

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RELATED STORIES & VIDEOS:

Источник: https://abc7news.com/solano-county-mask-mandate-indoor-bay-area/10926480/

COVID Vaccines: Solano County Officials Approve Plans For Mass Vaccination Site At Fairgrounds In Vallejo

Filed Under:Coronavirus, Coronavirus Vaccine, COVID-19, COVID-19 Vaccine, Kaiser Family Foundation, Solano County, Sutter Health, Touro University, Vallejo, Vallejo News

VALLEJO (BCN) – The Solano County Board of Supervisors approved a memorandum of understanding Tuesday with the Kaiser Family Foundation and several other partner organizations to operate a COVID-19 vaccination site at the county fairgrounds in Vallejo.

The MOU with the KFF, NorthBay Healthcare, Sutter Health Solano and Touro University would establish the vaccination site for a 90-day term, with the option of extending it for subsequent 90-day terms.

READ MORE: Police Officers Denied Service At San Francisco Restaurant Triggering Negative Reviews, Social Media Backlash

The clinic would administer vaccine doses for up to 12 hours per day, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., seven days per week, according to the county.

Several single-day vaccination clinics have already been held at the fairgrounds as the county progresses through vaccinating residents aged 65 and older, health care workers, food and agriculture workers and education and child care workers.

Similar clinics are expected to be held March 11-14.

READ MORE: SF Civic Center BART Station Reopens After 2-Hour Closure Sunday Morning

Each partner organization involved in the MOU must approve it before officials with the county and the KFF can proceed with the initial 90-day term, according to county officials.

Solano County residents can find information on the county’s COVID-19 vaccination distribution at https://www.solanocounty.com/depts/ph/coronavirus_links/covid_19_vaccines.asp.

As of Monday, 72,500 county residents had received at least one dose of the vaccine, according to the Solano County Public Health Department.

MORE NEWS: Bob Dole Dead at 98

© Copyright 2020 CBS Broadcasting Inc. and Bay City News Service. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Источник: https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2021/03/09/solano-county-covid-vaccination-site-vallejo-fairgrounds/

Public Health Nurse

Introduction

WHY WE EXIST

The mission of the Solano County Health & Social Services Department is to Promote Healthy, Safe and Stable Lives.

Vision: A Healthy, Safe and Stable Community

Core Values

  • Diversity: We respect and value cross –culturalism creating an environment that is inclusive for all.

  • Respect: We treat people with care and courtesy.

  • Integrity: We do what we say will.

  • Fairness: We are consistent and unbiased in decisions.

  • Transparency: We communicate the how and why.

  • Equity: We ensure everyone has access to the same opportunities. Responsiveness: We react quickly and positively.

    Diversity: We respect and value cross –culturalism creating an environment that is inclusive for all.

To learn more about the Department of Health & Social Services , please visit: https://www.solanocounty.com/depts/hss/default.asp

The Public Health Services Division believes that health is all about people; where they live, learn, work, and play. From our staff to our clients, we provide people with the tools they need to maintain and improve their health. The services we provide are incredibly diverse and include such activities as conducting public health nurse home visits for moms and babies, providing medical care in our clinics, and much more. You will not find a more committed group of people than public health workers. It takes a special kind of dedication to enter the public health field. Our passion is promoting health, livable communities and healthy lifestyles. As a result, we care for individuals and the community with compassion and respect.

To learn more about the Public Health Services Division, please visit:
http://www.solanocounty.com/depts/ph/about.asp

THE POSITION

Promotes community health maintenance through health assessment, education, case mangement and counseling in the detection, prevention and control of disease.

This class is the fully qualified professional level in the Public Health Nursing series.  This class is characterized by the responsibility to work with individuals and/or families in an assigned geographic area within the County and/or in clinics operated by the Health and Social Services Department or in Foster Care services. Clients typically have limited knowledge of health principles, nutrition, disease process, appropriate care or available resources.  Incumbents work in the community making home visits, as well as conducting specialty clinics and health education activities.  This class is distinguished from Public Health Nurse (Senior) in that the latter has responsibility to lead a work group in the delivery of services in an assigned health program, and typically perform special assignments requiring more sophisticated health assessment and evaluation techniques.

The eligible list established from this recruitment will be used to fill full-time and part-time regular, limited-term or extra-help positions as vacancies occur or the need arises.

POSITION REQUIREMENTS

Experience: One year of public health and clinical nursing experience.

AND

Education: A Bachelor’s degree is required in Nursing from a nursing school accredited by the National League for Nursing or equivalent.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

  • Possession of a valid Registered Nurse license issued by the California State Board of Registered Nursing and certification in Public Health Nursing.

  • Possession of a current CPR certificate.

  • Possession of, or ability to obtain, a valid Class C California driver’s license maybe required.

To view the job description for this position, please visit:

http://www.solanocounty.com/civicax/filebank/blobdload.aspx?blobid=15979

BENEFITS/ WHAT'S IN IT FOR YOU?

Solano County offers a cafeteria-style medical package with health benefits, offered through CalPERS. The County contribution for family coverage for the 2021 calendar year is $1,586.60 per month. The County offers a cash back provision for those who choose employee-only or who waive medical insurance coverage. The County may offer a supplemental contribution for employees enrolled in Employee plus Two or More coverage.

Dental and vision insurances for the employee and eligible dependents are paid 100% by the County.   

Solano County participates in CalPERS retirement and contributes to Social Security. 

The County observes 12 fixed, paid holidays per year, 2 half day fixed, and 2 floating paid holidays per year.

Vacation is accrued at approximately 10 days per year for the first 3 years. Sick leave accrues at approximately 12 days per year.

Employees are eligible to receive an additional 2.5% longevity pay, per level, after the completion of continuous service at 10, 20, 25, 30, and 35 years.

To view the benefits for a regular position, please visit:

http://www.solanocounty.com/civicax/filebank/blobdload.aspx?blobid=16512

Extra-help employees who work less than 29 hours per week do not typically receive or accrue benefits of regular employees during their period of employment. All extra-help employees accrue .034 hours of Paid Time Off for every full hour worked.

To view the benefits for an extra-help position, please visit:

https://www.solanocounty.com/civicax/filebank/blobdload.aspx?blobid=16516

CULTURE OF LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT

Solano County is committed to “Invest In and For the Future” by providing training resources to encourage employee professional development and growth within our organization. While employed with Solano County, employees have the opportunity to pursue their career goals, interests, and develop the competencies on the Solano County Leadership Development Model by participating in the following programs:

• Tuition Reimbursement Program

• Annual Education Fair

• County Mentoring Program

• Leadership Academy

• Supervisory Trainings

• Skill Development Trainings

• Self-paced learning opportunities

SELECTION PROCESS

Ongoing application review.

Based on the information provided in the application documents, the qualified applicants may be invited for further examination and will either be pre-scheduled by the Department of Human Resources or be invited to self-schedule. All applicants meeting the minimum qualifications are not guaranteed advancement through any subsequent phase of the examination. Depending upon the number of applications received, the selection process may consist of an initial application screening, a mandatory information meeting, a supplemental questionnaire assessment, a written and/or practical exam, an oral board exam, or any combination listed. Responses to supplemental questions may be used as screening and testing mechanisms and will be used to assess an applicant’s ability to advance in the process; as such, responses to supplemental questions should be treated as test examination responses. Information contained herein does not constitute either an expressed or implied contract.

A minimum score of 70% is required to continue in the selection process, unless otherwise announced.

All potential new hires and employees considered for promotion to management, confidential positions or unrepresented positions will be subject to a background and reference check after contingent job offer is accepted.  These provisions are subject to change.

RETIREES - Solano County invites all qualified candidates to apply for positions; however pursuant to Government Code Section 21221(h) and 21224, hiring restrictions may apply to California Public Sector Pension Plan Retirees.

HOW TO APPLY

Please visit the County of Solano website, www.jobsatsolanocounty.com, to apply. Applications must be submitted through the JobAps system. Paper copies of applications are not accepted. All additional application materials as requested in the job announcement (degree/transcripts, certificates, DD-214 if applicable, ADA Accommodation Request) must be submitted with the Document Cover Sheet, available on the employment website: https://jobapscloud.com/Solano/sup/doccover.pdf or at the Department of Human Resources’ office,  and are due by the final filing date.

Previously submitted application materials (i.e. copies of diploma and/or transcripts, etc.) for prior recruitments will not be applied for this recruitment but must be re-submitted for this recruitment.

Any further questions can be directed to the Department of Human Resources at (707) 784-6170 or at 675 Texas Street, Suite 1800 Fairfield 94533. The office is open Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. EOE/AA.

Please note that all dates/times listed in the job announcement are Pacific Time.

DOCUMENT SUBMITTAL REQUIREMENTS

A Bachelor’s Degree and Public Health Nurse Certificate is required for this position. All candidates must submit a copy of their college diploma (verifying the degree, date earned and area of specialization) or official/unofficial transcripts (verifying the date and degree conferred) and Public Health Nurse Certificate by the application review date. Candidates who fail to submit their diploma or transcripts application review date will be disqualified from the recruitment.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING:  Candidates who attended a college or university that is accredited by a foreign or non-U.S. accrediting agency must have their educational units evaluated by an educational evaluation service.  The result must be submitted to the Human Resources Department no later than the close of the recruitment.  Please contact the local college or university to learn where this service can be obtained.

How to Submit Your Documents

In addition to uploading attachments when applying online, candidates may submit documents in-person or by mail at Solano County Department of Human Resources 675 Texas Street, Suite 1800, Fairfield CA  94533, by fax to (707) 784-3424, or by email to [email protected]  When submitting documents in-person, by mail or by fax, include the recruitment title (Public Health Nurse) and the recruitment number (20-333110-02) If submitting documents by email include the recruitment title and recruitment number in the subject field.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

  • Positions allocated to this class may require specialization in target populations, programs and/or bilingual skills. 
  • Independent travel is required. 
  • Incumbents must be able to work in an environment that may include exposure to communicable disease. 
  • Candidates for employment must as a condition of employment sign a statement agreeing to comply with Section 11166 of the California Penal Code relating to child abuse reporting.

VETERANS PREFERENCE POINTS

To be eligible, applicant must have served at least 181 consecutive days of active duty in the Armed Forces of the United States and have received either an honorable discharge or a general discharge under honorable conditions.  A COPY OF THE DD 214, SHOWING DISCHARGE TYPE (GENERALLY COPY 4), MUST BE RECEIVED IN THE HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT BY THE FINAL FILING DATE.  Applicants who have a service connected disability must also submit a recent award letter from the VA stating they are receiving disability benefits for service connected reasons. 

Veteran applicants for initial County employment with an honorable or general under conditions discharge shall receive five (5) points added to their combined score.  Disabled veterans rated at not less than 30% disability shall have ten (10) points added to their combined score.  Veteran’s preference points will only be added to passing scores in competitive open examinations.

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT

It is the policy of Solano County that all employment decisions and personnel policies will be applied equally to all County employees and applicants and be based upon the needs of County service, job related merit, and ability to perform the job.

APPLICANTS WITH DISABILITIES:  Qualified individuals with a disability, who are able to perform the essential functions of the job, with or without reasonable accommodation, and need an accommodation during any phase of the recruitment/testing/examination process (as detailed in the “Selection Process”), must complete the following Request for Testing Accommodation by Applicants with Disabilities Form: http://www.solanocounty.com/civicax/filebank/blobdload.aspx?BlobID=23215.

This form must be received in the Human Resources Department by the final filing date of the recruitment.  Applicants will be contacted to discuss the specifics of the request.

SOLANO COUNTY

OUR COMMUNITY

Solano County is the ideal place to live, learn, work and play… The America's Promise Alliance has named Solano County as one of the 100 Best Communities for Young People for six straight years—the only California community with that distinction. 

  • Live – Solano County as well as cities within the County have ranked in the top 15 hottest markets across the country and within the Bay Area due to prime location and affordability.
  • Learn – Higher education abounds! Within the County, education choices include: Solano Community College, CSU Maritime Academy, Brandman University, and Touro University. Bordering our County is the renowned University of California Davis.
  • Work – The blend of agriculture, corporate business and pleasant lifestyle enhance the attraction of Solano County. Blessed with a thriving agricultural economy, the county is also home to biotechnology and other growth industries.
  • Play - Situated midway between San Francisco and Sacramento—the State capitol, Solano County is home to rolling hillsides, waterfronts and fertile farmland. County residents can enjoy day trips to the San Francisco Bay area, Lake Tahoe region and the Napa and Sonoma Valleys.

County Population (2018): 439,793 

The provisions of this bulletin do not constitute an expressed or implied contract. Any provision contained in this bulletin may be modified or revoked without notice. 

SOLANO COUNTY IS AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


Источник: https://www.jobapscloud.com/Solano/sup/BulPreview.asp?R1=20&R2=333110&R3=02

Get to know Registered Nurse, Tonya A. Jackson, who serves patients in California.

Tonya is a Public Health Nurse currently working at Solano County Public Health Department located in Fairfield, California. In order to provide her patients with the best care, she specializes in pediatrics and adult primary care.

Solano County Public Health Department prevents the spread of diseases, promotes health, and protects the public from health problems and hazards. Their staff provides services such as conducting public health nurse home visits for moms and babies, providing medical care in their clinics, investigating disease outbreaks, advancing local ordinances to protect residents’ health, and preparing for public health emergencies. Their passion is in promoting healthy, livable communities for Solano residents and community members.

To begin her career, Tonya obtained her nursing degree from Solano Community College in 2007. From there, she attended Touro University California and earned her Master’s in Nursing degree in 2019.

On a more personal note, Tonya attributes her success to her drive and love for helping others. She always knew she wanted to be a nurse.

Learn More about Tonya A. Jackson:
Through her online profile, https://todaysnurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4148117/info/

Источник: https://pressrelease.healthcare/tonya-a-jackson-rn-a-registered-nurse-with-solano-county-public-health-department.html

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