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OESC's Economic Research & Analysis Division collects information with the help of employers, the public, government agencies, and various other entities in. 17, the Arizona Department of Economic Security reported 17,993 since Social Security numbers are out there on these claims. Unemployment benefits may be available if you have recently lost your job. Start here. Learn about WA Cares. Affordable long-term care insurance for all working.

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Did you receive an unsolicited unemployment debit card in the mail? It's likely fraud, state says

Arizona Department of Economic Security Visa debit card

Arizona officials on Friday said that a new round of fraudulent unemployment claims is bogging down the state department that handles that work, and they are asking the public's help to report the crimes.

The Arizona Department of Economic Security is asking people who receive unemployment debit cards addressed to other people, or who are mailed cards in their names that they did not apply for, to report the potential fraud.

Fraudulent claims can be reported online at ​http://bit.ly/ReportAZUIFraud​ or by calling 1-800-251-2436.

DES asks that people include the full name listed on the documents, the address where they were received and the Social Security north central baptist hospital phone number of the person if they are in the resident's name. People receiving these cards should destroy them, DES said.

"Once DES is able to locate the fraudulent claim, we can take appropriate action and do not need the card returned," the department said.

For those who have had applications submitted in their name, DES recommends going online to the Federal Trade Commission website, https://identitytheft.gov, to report the potential identity theft and protect themselves from possible further victimization.

DES says these people also should monitor their credit report to ensure their identity has not been compromised in other ways.

DES has paid more than $11.4 billion in regular unemployment and "pandemic unemployment assistance" benefits since department of economic security number coronavirus pandemic hit the nation in March, with more than 1.6 million people receiving benefits.

PUA is a benefit set up by Congress to help people who were self-employed or otherwise wouldn't have qualified for regular unemployment during the pandemic. In the last two weeks alone, Arizona has received more than 660,000 PUA applications, "indicating a high number of fraudulent claims being filed," the department said Friday.

Arizona may have paid $500M in fraudulent claims

Officials have said that as much as $500 million in fraudulent claims might have been paid this year by the state, though the figure is not known and is only an estimate based on the number of illegitimate claims identified.

To avoid making fraudulent payments, DES is working with local and national law enforcement, and has taken actions such as suspending payments on some claims and even closing bank accounts set up by the department for claimants that DES later determined likely to be fraudulent.

The DES Office of Inspector General also launched a new task force to combat fraud, in addition to the cooperation with law enforcement the office already had, including with the Secret Service and FBI.

"The task force will identify suspects and co-conspirators perpetrating fraud schemes, investigate the network of criminals behind the fraudulent claims and work to prosecute these criminals," DES said. "The formation of the task force will combine a wide array of resources and law enforcement experience to combat the increase in illegal activity."

Reach reporter Ryan Randazzo at [email protected] or 602-444-4331. Follow him on Twitter @UtilityReporter.

Subscribe to azcentral.com today.

Источник: https://www.azcentral.com/story/money/business/consumers/2020/10/02/arizona-department-economic-security-warns-residents-fraud/3592735001/

Mr. Fischer, a longtime award-winning Arizona journalist, is founder and operator of Capitol Media Services.


Twitter: @azcapmedia
Источник: https://www.yourvalley.net/stories/arizona-des-checks-are-in-the-mail,158322

Changes coming for Arizona’s unemployment insurance program

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Thousands of Arizonans have fallen victim to identity theft during the pandemic, resulting in delayed or denied payments and financial devastation.

One expert says that a simple modernization and security upgrade to Arizona’s decades-old unemployment insurance program could have saved victims the trouble and also saved the state billions of dollars, according to the Arizona Daily Star.

A plan to do that is underway.

The state Department of Economic Security will begin accepting proposals this month for a contract to one or multiple companies to modernize the unemployment insurance benefits system.

With an unprecedented number of Arizonans experiencing unemployment during the pandemic, people were forced to rely on the state’s unemployment insurance, the then-new Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program and other forms of state and federal assistance.

The DES collaborated with federal, state and local partners during the pandemic to provide support to people impacted by job loss and other COVID-related issues and made improvements to existing programs to meet the surge in demand for services and that work will continue, the Star reported.

The department will use funding from the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 and a “small surplus in a UI administration fund” to pay for the technology upgrade, a decision resulting from the pandemic-related demand, DES Director Michael Wisehart said.

The state will seek additional funding in the 2023 fiscal year budget to close any potential gaps in funding the overall project.

“The age and complexity of the existing UI system will cost the state significantly more over the years as we continue to maintain, adjust and repair,” Wisehart said. “System modernization is not only sensible from a fiscal perspective, it is a crucial investment into our labor force. It will help to support those who face disruptions in employment as the rest of the workforce development system works with them to rebound and find their place again in the state’s economy.”

There’s no disputing the benefits of modernizing the state’s system and it was long overdue, said Haywood Talcove, CEO of LexisNexis Risk Solutions Government Group.

“What happened was something that was completely preventable,” Talcove told the Star.

In addition to an unprecedented number of unemployment claims, the pandemic also saw unprecedented fraud due to a variety of reasons.

Data breaches before and during the pandemic resulted in a “pile of personal identifiable information being collected by adversaries,” Talcove said.

Arizona also saw job posting scams in which criminal groups placed good-looking ads on reliable job boards.

Thousands of unemployed Arizonans applied for these jobs, received a real interview and were hired.

“All of a sudden you dream angel victoria secret a job that pays significantly more than you were making previously,” Talcove said. “You get excited, then they say they need to verify your identity.”

With about 18,000 false job listings having been identified online, the effect was disastrous, according to the Star.

“Each identity they got was worth approximately $26,000. They found systems that were completely open,” Talcove said.

While the total amount lost to fraud is still unknown, the U.S. Labor Department has estimated $87 billion in losses nationwide, Talcove said.

Arizona’s unemployment rate fluctuated between 4.8% and 14.2% during the pandemic, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor statistics.

LexisNexis estimates Arizona’s potential loss to fraud at nearly $2 billion, though a full accounting has yet to be performed.

Arizona DES spokesperson Tasya Peterson said in an email to the Star that fraudulent claims were a problem in all 50 states during the pandemic, but the DES took “proactive and aggressive action” to combat fraud in its programs, adding department of economic security number of protection to its systems to meet the evolving threat.

Источник: https://apnews.com/article/coronavirus-pandemic-business-health-arizona-unemployment-insurance-1b4db661e8cd4537e5754ea818cbcdc0

Japan minted a new economic security minister to fix supply chain disruptions

Japan has a brand new cabinet-level position in its government: a minister of economic security. Takayuki Kobayashi’s portfolio will entail tackling some of the most pressing geopolitical issues of the 21st century, including shoring up supply chains, securing critical infrastructure, protecting technological advantages, and countering economic espionage.

The economy and security “are intermixing more and more nowadays,” a freshly minted Kobayashi said in his first news conference. The 46-year-old three-term lawmaker, who goes by “Kobahawk” on Twitter (taka means hawk in Japanese), is tasked with making sure the Japanese government, across its ministries, “deal[s] with the economy and security as one.”

Japan’s high-powered focus department of economic security number economic security comes as many major nations begin scrutinizing in earnest their supply chains—from raw material access to manufacturing capabilities, the strengths and vulnerabilities of infrastructure like pipelines and undersea cables, and the competitiveness and resilience of critical industries like semiconductors and rare earth magnets.

“As far as I know, this is the very first economic department of economic security number [ministerial] role that has been created anywhere in the world,” said Akira Igata, executive director of the Center for Rule-Making Strategies at Tama University in Tokyo.

In creating the post, Japan’s new prime minister, Fumio Kishida, did not explicitly say the goal is to counter an increasingly aggressive China, just as Japan’s move last month to protect critical sectors from foreign takeovers never mentions China by name. But the country inevitably looms large. “These are all responses to the new reality of China becoming much stronger, China being dissatisfied with the status quo, China exploiting the system,” said Igata.

What is economic security?

Economic security is a broad term without a concise and established definition.

The US, under the Trump administration, declared (pdf) that “[e]conomic security is national security.” Meanwhile, the White House’s 100-day supply chain review (pdf), ordered by president Joe Biden, defined it as “steady employment and smooth operations of critical industries.”

That the concept defies easy definition says a lot about how it has evolved over the decades. A policy paper (pdf) laying out recommendations for a Japanese economic security strategy, published last December by the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), explained it succinctly: “Looking back over history, many conflicts between nations in the past revolved around energy and other resources. In those days, the risk of depending on other countries for resources fundamental to a nation’s survival was so evident that any reference to ‘economic security’ was unnecessary as such.”

Today, economic and national security go far beyond securing things like oil, water, and borders. At stake are supply chains that criss-cross the globe, a digital economy that is still largely borderless, and key technologies licensed for use worldwide even as their core patents are held only by a handful of countries.

Enter Kobayashi, whose job it now is to guide Japan through this maze of complexities—making the country both stronger and more resilient to the threat of crippling economic coercion from adversarial nations. According to LDP secretary general and former economic minister Akira Amari, the big picture will be key for Kobayashi, who must be able to “give instructions to all ministries.”

“Japan’s economic statecraft awakening”

Some experts say this reckoning is a long time coming. “2010 should have been a wakeup call, but…the rapid policy changes really happened over the past two or three years,” Igata says. That timeframe overlaps with a markedly more aggressive China, from its crackdown on Hong Kong and belligerent “wolf warrior” diplomacy to punitive economic measures against Australia.

What happened in 2010 was China’s sudden embargo on rare earth exports to Japan over a fishing trawler dispute. Japan was almost entirely dependent on China for the critical minerals, and the incident exposed an acute vulnerability. In the ensuing years, Japan significantly cut its dependence on China for rare earths, but “they haven’t really been thinking about economic security as a more widespread phenomenon,” says Igata. Until now.

In a recently published article, Igata and Brad Glosserman describe this shift as ”Japan’s economic statecraft awakening,” referring to how Tokyo has in the past couple of years broadened its strategic thinking on the building blocks of national security. They point to the launch last April of a brand new economic division within the existing National Security Secretariat as a key development in Japan’s strategic priorities. Kobayashi’s role is just the latest in a series of moves to “increase [Japan’s] economic security potential,” said Igata. And that isn’t necessarily confined to government: Japanese officials reportedly want companies in the nation’s strategic sectors to also appoint economic security executives.

Meanwhile, Japan is working with Australia and India to make supply chains more resilient and to counter China’s trade dominance in the Indo-Pacific—an initiative that Beijing quickly labeled “artificial” and “unfavorable” to the global economy. Tokyo and Washington are also cooperating on critical supply chain issues.

For now, the most immediate task for Kobayashi may be to draft a comprehensive law to promote all kinds of economic security measures, which is expected to be tabled at the next parliamentary session in the Japanese Diet starting in January.

Источник: https://qz.com/2070498/japan-has-a-new-economic-security-chief-to-secure-supply-chains/

Arizona DES: Checks are in the mail for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance

PHOENIX —The checks are finally going out to Arizonans who are ineligible for the state’s regular unemployment department of economic security number program.

Officials from the Department of Economic Security said Monday they were mailing 165,000 checks out to individuals who filed for benefits through May 2. These checks will be for at least $2,151 — $117 base state payment plus $600 under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program — which represents three weeks’ worth of benefits.

The total department of economic security number paid out to those 165,000 Arizonans amounts to $350 million. And, eventually, those who are eligible will get checks going back as far as Feb. 2.

Today, DES will be taking department of economic security number and updated applications for the PUA program online.

But other problems remain.

In a Twitter message Monday afternoon, the agency said it was aware that there are some who filed department of economic security number weekly certifications of eligibility for the state’s regular unemployment benefits recently who are not getting the payment.

“We sincerely apologize and are working to correct this as quickly as possible,” the message says. “We will provide an update as soon as we have an estimated date of payment for these claims.”

The developments come as the agency reported Monday that another nearly 33,000 Arizonans — close to 1 percent of the total workforce — had applied for first-time jobless benefits last week.

That brings to more than 545,000 the number who said they have lost work sine the middle of March due to any combination of the COVID-19 pandemic, the stay-at-home order issued by Gov. Doug Ducey and the governor’s separate orders shuttering certain kinds of businesses, resulting in furloughs and layoffs.

It also represents more than 15 percent of the total state civilian labor force.

Whether that becomes the figure in the actual monthly unemployment report depends on several variables.

The most significant is that the official report is based on a survey of households where residents are asked whether they are working and, if not, whether they are actually looking for work. That would include people who want jobs but had not applied for unemployment benefits, whether due to eligibility or simply the inability to complete their applications.

And the next report, due to be released May 21, covers only a snapshot of the situation in Arizona during the second full week in April. The official May jobless figures won’t be announced until June 18.

The filings also come as Mr. Ducey has eased up on some of his orders.

This past Friday he allowed barber shops and hair salons to reopen if they follow certain health protocols.

More significant, as of Monday the governor agreed to permit dine-in services at restaurants and bars, some of which had remained open on a limited basis for take-out and pick-up services. That should result in rehiring of some employees, though the safety restrictions, effectively including some seating limits, may still leave some facilities short of previous staffing levels.

It will take weeks, if not longer, to see how that affects the state’s jobless rate.

The Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program was created by Congress as part of the Conronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act to help those who are otherwise ineligible for standard state benefits. Generally speaking, that includes the self employed, independent contractors and those in the “gig economy,” like drivers for rideshare programs.

Benefits are available for up to 39 weeks.

It also has had a rocky start in Arizona.

While people have been eligible for the PUA payments now for months, the state has been slow in actually setting up a process for applications. Michael Wisehart, the agency’s deputy director of employment and relief services, said the system set up to handle regular unemployment claims would not work for those in the PUA program.

So the department of economic security number had to hire an outside firm to set up a separate system. And that went online only this week.

Under normal circumstances, those seeking benefits would have to actively be seeking work to remain eligible. But agency spokesman Brett Bezio said that has been suspended for both regular and PUA benefits under department of economic security number terms of an executive order by Gov. Doug Ducey.

Mr. Bezio said, however, that to get the PUA benefits applicants have to self-certify that they are otherwise able to work and available but for the fact they are unemployed, partially unemployed, or are unable or unavailable for work because of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Howard Fischer


@azcapmedia

Unemployment Insurance

ADWS administers Arkansas’ Unemployment Insurance (UI) program and facilitates employer compliance with the Arkansas Employment Security Law, collects unemployment insurance contributions from employers, provides unemployment insurance benefits to those eligible, and maintains management information systems for filing unemployment insurance claims and fraud detection.

Individual Filing an Initial Claim

A claim for Unemployment Insurance may be filed in person at any Arkansas Workforce Center office.  A valid government ID is required (Driver’s License or Passport).

UI claimant forms are also available online, as well as located in most public buildings for filing claims by mail. Learn more about filing a claim and eligibility for benefits.

EZARC is another option to file an initial or additional claim for Arkansas Unemployment Insurance via the Internet. If you are working less than full-time, or have completely separated from your last job, you may file your Arkansas Unemployment Insurance claim from your own home computer. To file an EZARC online claim, you must have access to a computer, a printer and an Internet connection.

Weekly UI Claim Filing

ArkLine: This interactive voice response system is a quick and easy way to file for your weekly unemployment insurance benefits by using your touch-tone telephone. This system also provides you with updated information and can be used to verify when your weekly claim was processed.

ArkNet: If you currently have a valid Arkansas claim for Unemployment Insurance, you may choose to file for weekly benefits online. To use ArkNet, Arkansas’ continued claims website, you must have access to a computer, a printer and an Internet connection.

Claim Help: This guide to understanding Arkansas’ Unemployment Insurance program makes it easy to learn about the filing process for new or additional claim benefits. Locate helpful UI handbooks and other beneficial information about UI claims.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance: This federally funded program provides financial assistance and employment services to jobless workers and the self employed when they are unemployed as a direct result of a major natural disaster, if DUA benefits are made available.

Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA): TAA is a benefit for those workers who lose their jobs department of economic security number whose hours of work and wages are reduced as a result of increased imports. This program includes a variety of benefits and reemployment services to help unemployed workers prepare for and obtain suitable employment. Workers may receive assistance in skill assessment, job search workshops, job development/referral and job placement. In addition, workers may be eligible for training, job search allowance, a relocation allowance and other reemployment services.

Trade Readjustment Allowances (TRA): This specific form of Trade Adjustment Assistance is paid to an eligible adversely affected worker on a weekly basis after he/she exhausts entitlement to regular unemployment compensation, including state and federal extensions.

Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment Program: The Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) Program is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Labor to help certain Unemployment Insurance claimants return to work faster.

Participants in the RESEA program are obligated to meet various program requirements that include completing a Career Action Plan (CAP), conducting labor market research, tracking work search activities, providing a resume and participating in ongoing reemployment services.

All program requirements are explained at the Initial RESEA review, where participants meet one-on-one with a Reemployment Specialist. Failure to comply with the RESEA program requirements will result in a delay or loss of unemployment benefits.

LWA FAQs


Unemployment Programs FlowchartReliaCard Debit CardArkansas Job LinkAppealing UI DeterminationVeterans ServicesGovernor's Dislocated Workers Task Force

  • Arkansas JobLink
    Create an account for job search, job services, job openings and more.
  • AHTD Jobs
    A list of job openings with the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department.
  • ADC Jobs
    A list of job openings at the Arkansas Department of Corrections.

ADWS Laws & Regulations:

More Helpful Links:


Download State Job Application
Источник: https://www.dws.arkansas.gov/unemployment/

Department of economic security number -

Did you receive an unsolicited unemployment debit card in the mail? It's likely fraud, state says

Arizona Department of Economic Security Visa debit card

Arizona officials on Friday said that a new round of fraudulent unemployment claims is bogging down the state department that handles that work, and they are asking the public's help to report the crimes.

The Arizona Department of Economic Security is asking people who receive unemployment debit cards addressed to other people, or who are mailed cards in their names that they did not apply for, to report the potential fraud.

Fraudulent claims can be reported online at ​http://bit.ly/ReportAZUIFraud​ or by calling 1-800-251-2436.

DES asks that people include the full name listed on the documents, the address where they were received and the Social Security number of the person if they are in the resident's name. People receiving these cards should destroy them, DES said.

"Once DES is able to locate the fraudulent claim, we can take appropriate action and do not need the card returned," the department said.

For those who have had applications submitted in their name, DES recommends going online to the Federal Trade Commission website, https://identitytheft.gov, to report the potential identity theft and protect themselves from possible further victimization.

DES says these people also should monitor their credit report to ensure their identity has not been compromised in other ways.

DES has paid more than $11.4 billion in regular unemployment and "pandemic unemployment assistance" benefits since the coronavirus pandemic hit the nation in March, with more than 1.6 million people receiving benefits.

PUA is a benefit set up by Congress to help people who were self-employed or otherwise wouldn't have qualified for regular unemployment during the pandemic. In the last two weeks alone, Arizona has received more than 660,000 PUA applications, "indicating a high number of fraudulent claims being filed," the department said Friday.

Arizona may have paid $500M in fraudulent claims

Officials have said that as much as $500 million in fraudulent claims might have been paid this year by the state, though the figure is not known and is only an estimate based on the number of illegitimate claims identified.

To avoid making fraudulent payments, DES is working with local and national law enforcement, and has taken actions such as suspending payments on some claims and even closing bank accounts set up by the department for claimants that DES later determined likely to be fraudulent.

The DES Office of Inspector General also launched a new task force to combat fraud, in addition to the cooperation with law enforcement the office already had, including with the Secret Service and FBI.

"The task force will identify suspects and co-conspirators perpetrating fraud schemes, investigate the network of criminals behind the fraudulent claims and work to prosecute these criminals," DES said. "The formation of the task force will combine a wide array of resources and law enforcement experience to combat the increase in illegal activity."

Reach reporter Ryan Randazzo at [email protected] or 602-444-4331. Follow him on Twitter @UtilityReporter.

Subscribe to azcentral.com today.

Источник: https://www.azcentral.com/story/money/business/consumers/2020/10/02/arizona-department-economic-security-warns-residents-fraud/3592735001/

UPDATED: Fraudulent Unemployment Claims and Identity Theft

UPDATED - Aug. 6, 2021

The University, Arizona, and states across the nation have seen a surge in unemployment benefit fraud, largely in association with identity theft. Although there has not been a breach of information stored by AZ Department of Economic Security (DES) or the University, fraudsters are using phishing scams, previous corporate data breaches, and other tactics to collect information from individuals across the country.

Phishing notice

If you get a suspicious text message or email claiming to be from a state workforce agency, please report it to the National Center for Disaster Fraud. You also can report it to the Federal Trade Commission. And please, tell the people you know about this scam. By sharing the information, you can help defeat the scammers.

Learn more on this Federal Trade Commission Blog post.

What should you to do if you suspect you are a victim of unemployment fraud?

You may receive a notification through mail or other personal communication. If Human Resources notifies you, start at step 3.

  1. University employees: Notify Human Resources by emailing [email protected] If more information becomes available, we will contact you using email.

  2. Destroy any debit cards or checks you receive from the Arizona DES.

  3. Report fraud to Arizona DES here. Complete this official and secure form in its entirety. DES will be able to make any correction to your account and is partnering with law enforcement to conduct investigations.

  4. Watch for notices in the mail from the Arizona DES and pay close attention to the 2020 tax forms you receive. If you receive a 1099-G form for unemployment compensation you did not receive, contact DES immediately. Visit AZ DES' 1099-G Tax Form webpage to report the form you received.

  5. Report the identity theft to the Federal Trade Commission here. This site can help you recover from identity theft.

  6. Report the identity theft to the Department of Justice’s National Center for Disaster Fraud Disaster Complain Form.

  7. Consider freezing your credit files with  Equifax, Experian, Innovis, TransUnion, and the National Consumer Telecommunications and Utilities Exchange for free. Credit freezes prevent someone from opening a credit account or utility services in your name.

If the University receives an unemployment insurance claim for you

Human Resources will email you to confirm the claim is fraudulent. Human Resources will notify the claims management vendor to dispute the claim, which will also correct the record with DES. However, it is still important that you take steps 3-7 described above.


University communication regarding unemployment fraud

Источник: https://hr.arizona.edu/news/fraudulent-unemployment-claims

Changes coming for Arizona’s unemployment insurance program

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Thousands of Arizonans have fallen victim to identity theft during the pandemic, resulting in delayed or denied payments and financial devastation.

One expert says that a simple modernization and security upgrade to Arizona’s decades-old unemployment insurance program could have saved victims the trouble and also saved the state billions of dollars, according to the Arizona Daily Star.

A plan to do that is underway.

The state Department of Economic Security will begin accepting proposals this month for a contract to one or multiple companies to modernize the unemployment insurance benefits system.

With an unprecedented number of Arizonans experiencing unemployment during the pandemic, people were forced to rely on the state’s unemployment insurance, the then-new Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program and other forms of state and federal assistance.

The DES collaborated with federal, state and local partners during the pandemic to provide support to people impacted by job loss and other COVID-related issues and made improvements to existing programs to meet the surge in demand for services and that work will continue, the Star reported.

The department will use funding from the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 and a “small surplus in a UI administration fund” to pay for the technology upgrade, a decision resulting from the pandemic-related demand, DES Director Michael Wisehart said.

The state will seek additional funding in the 2023 fiscal year budget to close any potential gaps in funding the overall project.

“The age and complexity of the existing UI system will cost the state significantly more over the years as we continue to maintain, adjust and repair,” Wisehart said. “System modernization is not only sensible from a fiscal perspective, it is a crucial investment into our labor force. It will help to support those who face disruptions in employment as the rest of the workforce development system works with them to rebound and find their place again in the state’s economy.”

There’s no disputing the benefits of modernizing the state’s system and it was long overdue, said Haywood Talcove, CEO of LexisNexis Risk Solutions Government Group.

“What happened was something that was completely preventable,” Talcove told the Star.

In addition to an unprecedented number of unemployment claims, the pandemic also saw unprecedented fraud due to a variety of reasons.

Data breaches before and during the pandemic resulted in a “pile of personal identifiable information being collected by adversaries,” Talcove said.

Arizona also saw job posting scams in which criminal groups placed good-looking ads on reliable job boards.

Thousands of unemployed Arizonans applied for these jobs, received a real interview and were hired.

“All of a sudden you have a job that pays significantly more than you were making previously,” Talcove said. “You get excited, then they say they need to verify your identity.”

With about 18,000 false job listings having been identified online, the effect was disastrous, according to the Star.

“Each identity they got was worth approximately $26,000. They found systems that were completely open,” Talcove said.

While the total amount lost to fraud is still unknown, the U.S. Labor Department has estimated $87 billion in losses nationwide, Talcove said.

Arizona’s unemployment rate fluctuated between 4.8% and 14.2% during the pandemic, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor statistics.

LexisNexis estimates Arizona’s potential loss to fraud at nearly $2 billion, though a full accounting has yet to be performed.

Arizona DES spokesperson Tasya Peterson said in an email to the Star that fraudulent claims were a problem in all 50 states during the pandemic, but the DES took “proactive and aggressive action” to combat fraud in its programs, adding layers of protection to its systems to meet the evolving threat.

Источник: https://apnews.com/article/coronavirus-pandemic-business-health-arizona-unemployment-insurance-1b4db661e8cd4537e5754ea818cbcdc0

How Do I File for Unemployment Insurance?

Guidance on Unemployment Insurance Flexibilities During COVID-19 Outbreak

NOTE: Check with your state’s unemployment insurance program regarding the rules in your state.

Federal law permits significant flexibility for states to amend their laws to provide unemployment insurance benefits in multiple scenarios related to COVID-19. For example, federal law provides states flexibility to pay benefits where:

  1. An employer temporarily ceases operations due to COVID-19, preventing employees from coming to work;
  2. An individual is quarantined with the expectation of returning to work after the quarantine is over; and
  3. An individual leaves employment due to a risk of exposure or infection or to care for a family member.

In addition, federal law does not require an employee to quit in order to receive benefits due to the impact of COVID-19.

Webpages on this Topic

Office of Unemployment Insurance

State Unemployment Insurance

  • The Federal-State Unemployment Insurance Program provides unemployment benefits to eligible workers who are unemployed through no fault of their own (as determined under state law), and meet other eligibility requirements of state law.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance

  • Disaster Unemployment Assistance provides financial assistance to individuals whose employment or self-employment has been lost or interrupted as a direct result of a major disaster declared by the President of the United States.

Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees

  • The Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees program provides benefits for eligible unemployed former civilian federal employees.

Unemployment Compensation for Ex-Service Members

  • The Unemployment Compensation for Ex-Service Members program provides benefits for eligible ex-military personnel.

Unemployment Insurance Extended Benefits

  • Extended Benefits may be available to workers who have exhausted regular unemployment insurance benefits during periods of high unemployment.

Trade Readjustment Allowances

  • Trade Readjustment Allowances are income support to persons who have exhausted Unemployment Compensation and whose jobs were affected by foreign imports.

Self-Employment Assistance

  • Self-Employment Assistance offers dislocated workers the opportunity for early re-employment.

Unemployment Insurance Improper Payments By State

  • The U.S. Department of Labor collaborates with our state partners to identify several robust strategies that focus on the prevention of overpayments and will yield the highest impact in reducing unemployment insurance improper payment rates.

Through American Job Centers, all citizens can access services tailored to their individual needs. This includes employment and job training services, career planning and guidance and much more.

CareerOneStop provides online tools to assist workers with finding a job, utilizing available training opportunities or conducting career planning. There is no cost to businesses or workers who use this service.

The Department of Labor's toll-free call center can assist workers and employers with questions about job loss, layoffs, business closures, unemployment benefits and job training: 1-877-US-2JOBS (TTY: 1-877-889-5627).

Additional information on topics relevant to the unemployed can be found on the Department of Labor's web interface, Find It! By Audience - Job Seekers/Unemployed.

Источник: https://www.dol.gov/general/topic/unemployment-insurance

Japan minted a new economic security minister to fix supply chain disruptions

Japan has a brand new cabinet-level position in its government: a minister of economic security. Takayuki Kobayashi’s portfolio will entail tackling some of the most pressing geopolitical issues of the 21st century, including shoring up supply chains, securing critical infrastructure, protecting technological advantages, and countering economic espionage.

The economy and security “are intermixing more and more nowadays,” a freshly minted Kobayashi said in his first news conference. The 46-year-old three-term lawmaker, who goes by “Kobahawk” on Twitter (taka means hawk in Japanese), is tasked with making sure the Japanese government, across its ministries, “deal[s] with the economy and security as one.”

Japan’s high-powered focus on economic security comes as many major nations begin scrutinizing in earnest their supply chains—from raw material access to manufacturing capabilities, the strengths and vulnerabilities of infrastructure like pipelines and undersea cables, and the competitiveness and resilience of critical industries like semiconductors and rare earth magnets.

“As far as I know, this is the very first economic security [ministerial] role that has been created anywhere in the world,” said Akira Igata, executive director of the Center for Rule-Making Strategies at Tama University in Tokyo.

In creating the post, Japan’s new prime minister, Fumio Kishida, did not explicitly say the goal is to counter an increasingly aggressive China, just as Japan’s move last month to protect critical sectors from foreign takeovers never mentions China by name. But the country inevitably looms large. “These are all responses to the new reality of China becoming much stronger, China being dissatisfied with the status quo, China exploiting the system,” said Igata.

What is economic security?

Economic security is a broad term without a concise and established definition.

The US, under the Trump administration, declared (pdf) that “[e]conomic security is national security.” Meanwhile, the White House’s 100-day supply chain review (pdf), ordered by president Joe Biden, defined it as “steady employment and smooth operations of critical industries.”

That the concept defies easy definition says a lot about how it has evolved over the decades. A policy paper (pdf) laying out recommendations for a Japanese economic security strategy, published last December by the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), explained it succinctly: “Looking back over history, many conflicts between nations in the past revolved around energy and other resources. In those days, the risk of depending on other countries for resources fundamental to a nation’s survival was so evident that any reference to ‘economic security’ was unnecessary as such.”

Today, economic and national security go far beyond securing things like oil, water, and borders. At stake are supply chains that criss-cross the globe, a digital economy that is still largely borderless, and key technologies licensed for use worldwide even as their core patents are held only by a handful of countries.

Enter Kobayashi, whose job it now is to guide Japan through this maze of complexities—making the country both stronger and more resilient to the threat of crippling economic coercion from adversarial nations. According to LDP secretary general and former economic minister Akira Amari, the big picture will be key for Kobayashi, who must be able to “give instructions to all ministries.”

“Japan’s economic statecraft awakening”

Some experts say this reckoning is a long time coming. “2010 should have been a wakeup call, but…the rapid policy changes really happened over the past two or three years,” Igata says. That timeframe overlaps with a markedly more aggressive China, from its crackdown on Hong Kong and belligerent “wolf warrior” diplomacy to punitive economic measures against Australia.

What happened in 2010 was China’s sudden embargo on rare earth exports to Japan over a fishing trawler dispute. Japan was almost entirely dependent on China for the critical minerals, and the incident exposed an acute vulnerability. In the ensuing years, Japan significantly cut its dependence on China for rare earths, but “they haven’t really been thinking about economic security as a more widespread phenomenon,” says Igata. Until now.

In a recently published article, Igata and Brad Glosserman describe this shift as ”Japan’s economic statecraft awakening,” referring to how Tokyo has in the past couple of years broadened its strategic thinking on the building blocks of national security. They point to the launch last April of a brand new economic division within the existing National Security Secretariat as a key development in Japan’s strategic priorities. Kobayashi’s role is just the latest in a series of moves to “increase [Japan’s] economic security potential,” said Igata. And that isn’t necessarily confined to government: Japanese officials reportedly want companies in the nation’s strategic sectors to also appoint economic security executives.

Meanwhile, Japan is working with Australia and India to make supply chains more resilient and to counter China’s trade dominance in the Indo-Pacific—an initiative that Beijing quickly labeled “artificial” and “unfavorable” to the global economy. Tokyo and Washington are also cooperating on critical supply chain issues.

For now, the most immediate task for Kobayashi may be to draft a comprehensive law to promote all kinds of economic security measures, which is expected to be tabled at the next parliamentary session in the Japanese Diet starting in January.

Источник: https://qz.com/2070498/japan-has-a-new-economic-security-chief-to-secure-supply-chains/
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