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Is a garlic supplement good for you


is a garlic supplement good for you

Garlic is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements. Garlic has long been associated with health benefits – from curing a cold to lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Garlic contains vitamins C and. Studies have shown that raw garlic is necessary in high doses, about 5-28 cloves per person, per day, to feel the health benefits (1). Whereas garlic supplement.

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Summary of Garlic

Primary information, health benefits, side effects, usage, and other important details

Garlic (Allium sativum) is a popular vegetable with a variety of medicinal properties.

Taking or eating garlic can benefit cardiovascular health, physical and sexual vitality, cognition, and resistance to infection. It also has anti-aging properties.

Raw or aged garlic reliably reduces total cholesterol and Low-density Lipoprotein (LDL-C), while increasing High-density Lipoprotein (HDL-C). Garlic also provides a variety of anti-cancer properties. Eating garlic daily (10g or more) is associated with a significantly reduced risk of prostate, colon, and stomach cancer. It can also induce fat loss and adrenaline secretion, though in a minor way. Garlic appears to mildly and unreliably reduce triglyceride levels.

Garlic’s main mechanism involves a molecule called alliin. When garlic is physically disturbed through chewing, slicing, or crushing, it releases an alliin metabolite: allicin. Allicin turns into a variety of fat and water soluble sulfur-containing compounds. In fact, these compounds are so volatile, they give off hydrogen sulfide, which is part of garlic’s unmistakable smell and taste. By tapping into the hydrogen sulfide signaling system, garlic relaxes the blood vessels and provides a variety of health benefits. Garlic also uses the hydrogen sulfide signaling system to exert its anti-cancer effects.

Garlic can be taken in several forms: fresh/raw garlic, aged garlic, garlic oil and boiled garlic. Boiled garlic prevents alliin from creating its sulfur-containing metabolites, and garlic oil, while effective as a supplement, has a potentially high level of toxicity. All of the beneficial components of garlic can be found in fresh garlic, which makes aged garlic supplements and fresh garlic the two best ways to supplement garlic. Garlic should be crushed, sliced, or chewed (prior to cooking) in order to ensure maximum allicin production, since allicin is responsible for many of garlic’s beneficial effects.

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How to Take

Recommended dosage, active amounts, other details

Most studies on garlic use a dosage range of 600-1,200mg a day, usually divided into multiple doses. The minimum effective dose for raw garlic is a single segment of a garlic bulb (called a clove), eaten with meals two or three times a day.

Aged garlic is a popular form of garlic to use for supplementation, since it does not have a fresh garlic scent. Garlic supplementation can also be done through food alone, though side-effects will include strong garlic-scented breath.

Microwaving garlic will partially destroy the beneficial components of the vegetable, but grilling and roasting will not damage the bioactives, provided the garlic is sliced or crushed beforehand. Garlic can be toxic if consumed in very high doses, so supplementation should never go beyond 5% of the diet. This results in the following maximum dosages:

  • 17.0 grams for a 150lb person

  • 22.7 grams for a 200lb person

  • 28.4 grams for a 250lb person

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The Human Effect Matrix summarizes human studies to tell you what effects Garlic has on your body, how much evidence there is, and how strong these effects are.

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Studies Excluded from Consideration

NOTE: The above table includes studies on Aged Garlic Extract as well as Garlic Oil supplementation, and may include studies on raw garlic consumption. They are not always interchangeable so read the context areas.

  • Confounded with other nutraceuticals[2][3]

  • Used alongside pharmaceuticals (adjuvant therapy)[4][5]

  • Confounded with CoQ10[6]

Stay on top of the latest research


Things to Note

Also Known As

Allium sativum, Vegetable Viagra, Da suan, Camphor of the poor, Lasun, Stinking Rose, Ail, Ajo

Goes Well With

  • Tazma Honey (for antibacterial purposes)

Caution Notice

Potential blood thinning properties at higher doses

Known to interact with some pharmaceuticals

  • The lowest estimated 'toxic' dose associated with raw garlic consumption has been noted to be a human equivalent of 400mg/kg (or 25g of raw garlic), which resulted in testicular toxicity

  • It is possible to be allergic to garlic supplements, if you are allergic to garlic itself

  • 8g (about two large cloves) of garlic can cut blood levels of Saquinavir in half

  • While moderate dietary intake of garlic does not reduce platelet aggregation or adversely interact with Warfarin, higher doses (2,400-7,200mg of Aged Garlic Extract) may do so

  • Contrary to popular belief, garlic may attract vampires[1]

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Click here to see all 668 references.

This page is regularly updated, to include the most recently available clinical trial evidence.

Each member of our research team is required to have no conflicts of interest, including with supplement manufacturers, food companies, and industry funders. The team includes nutrition researchers, registered dietitians, physicians, and pharmacists. We have a strict editorial process.

This page features 668 references. All factual claims are followed by specifically-applicable references. Click here to see the full set of research information and references for Garlic.

Examine.com is intended to be used for educational and information purposes only. Examine.com and its Editors do not advocate nutritional supplementation over proper medical advice or treatment and this sentiment will never be expressed through pages hosted under Examine.com. If using any pharmaceuticals or drugs given to you by a doctor or received with a prescription, you must consult with the doctor in question or an equally qualified Health Care Professional prior to using any nutritional supplementation. If undergoing medical therapies, then consult with your respective Therapist or Health Care Professional about possible interactions between your Treatment, any Pharmaceuticals or Drugs being given, and possible nutritional supplements or practices hosted on Examine.com.

Examine.com does not assume liability for any actions undertaken after visiting these pages, and does not assume liability if one misuses supplements. Examine.com and its Editors do not ensure that unforeseen side effects will not occur even at the proper dosages, and thereby does not assume liability for any side effects from supplements or practices hosted under the domain of Examine.com.

Источник: https://examine.com/supplements/garlic/

Discover our full range of health benefit guides, then check out some of our delicious garlic recipesand a video on how to crush garlic.

Nutritional Benefits

One clove (4g) of garlic provides:

  • 4Kcal / 16KJ
  • 0.3g protein
  • 0.0g fat
  • 0.7g carbohydrates
  • 0.2g fibre
  • 25mg Potassium

5 health benefits of garlic

1. Contains compounds with medicinal properties

Much of garlic’s therapeutic acclaim is down to an active compound called allicin. This sulphur-containing compound gives garlic its pungent smell and distinctive taste. Luckily for us cooks, the action of chopping or crushing stimulates the production of allicin. But, it is thought that the application of heat may inhibit some of the perceived medicinal properties, making it best to add garlic late in the cooking process.

2. May reduce the risk of heart attacks

Much research has focused on garlic’s potential in reducing the risk of heart disease and helping to manage cholesterol levels. Several studies suggest that garlic makes platelets (the cells involved in blood clotting) less likely to clump together and accumulate on artery walls; this means garlic acts like an anticoagulant and by so doing reduces the risk of heart attacks.

Garlic may also lower blood pressure through its ability to widen blood vessels, allowing blood to flow more freely.

3. May have anti-cancer properties

The sulphurous compounds in garlic have been studied for their ability to inhibit cancerous cells and block tumours. That said, much of the evidence for garlic in relation to colon, prostate, oesophageal and renal cancer is observational, with only small numbers of subjects included in the studies. As a result, the effect garlic has in relation to cancer remains uncertain and more studies are needed.

4. Has antimicrobial and antifungal properties

Garlic has a long history of use as an infection fighter against viruses, bacteria and fungi. It has been referred to as ‘Russian penicillin’ to denote its antibacterial properties, which is once again attributed to the compound allicin. Some skin conditions, such as warts and insect bites, may also respond to garlic oil or a crushed raw garlic clove.

5. May support bone health

Animal studies suggest garlic may minimise bone loss by increasing oestrogen levels in female rodents. A study in post-menopausal women found a similar effect when a daily dose of dry garlic extract (equivalent to 2g of raw garlic) was consumed.

Studies also suggest the consumption of garlic may give some relief from the inflammatory symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Is garlic safe for everyone?

Garlic poses few safety issues and allergies are rare. If you take garlic supplements for cholesterol management, have your cholesterol levels checked after three months. The recommended daily amount of garlic ranges from ½-1 whole clove per day (around 3000-6000mcg of allicin).

Please note that some people may experience indigestion, intestinal gas or diarrhoea when taking high doses of garlic.

Recipe suggestions for garlic

A simple aïoli is a great accompaniment for roasts, fish or as a dip:
Homemade aïoli
Salmon & prawns with dill & lime aïoli

Make your own delicious garlic bread:
Garlic & basil ciabatta
Quick tomato soup with cheesy garlic dippers

Cook with mushrooms:
Garlic mushroom burgers
Mushrooms on toast
Garlicky mushroom penne

Pair with prawns:
Stir-fry prawns with peppers & spinach
Lemony prawn bruschettas

Add flavour to mashed potato and stews:
Roast sweet potato squash & garlic mash
Garlic mash potato bake
Spicy root & lentil casserole

Garlic is great with chicken:
Garlic chicken with herbed potatoes

Want more? Take inspiration from our garlic recipes.


This article was last reviewed on 6 October 2021 by Kerry Torrens.

Kerry Torrens is a qualified nutritionist (MBANT) with a postgraduate diploma in Personalised Nutrition & Nutritional Therapy. She is a member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and a member of the Guild of Food Writers. Over the past 15 years she has been a contributing author to a number of nutritional and cookery publications including BBC Good Food.

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact your local health care provider. See our website terms and conditions for more information.

Источник: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/ingredient-focus-garlic

Garlic 'remedy for hypertension'

By Helen Briggs
Health reporter, BBC News

Garlic may be useful in addition to medication to treat high blood pressure, a study suggests.

Australian doctors enrolled 50 patients in a trial to see if garlic supplements could help those whose blood pressure was high, despite medication.

Those given four capsules of garlic extract a day had lower blood pressure than those on placebo, they report in scientific journal Maturitas.

The British Heart Foundation said more research was needed.

Garlic has long been thought to be good for the heart.

Garlic supplements have previously been shown to lower cholesterol and reduce high blood pressure in those with untreated hypertension.

In the latest study, researchers from the University of Adelaide, Australia, looked at the effects of four capsules a day of a supplement known as aged garlic for 12 weeks.

They found systolic blood pressure was around 10mmHg lower in the group given garlic compared with those given a placebo.

Researcher Karin Ried said: "Garlic supplements have been associated with a blood pressure lowering effect of clinical significance in patients with untreated hypertension.

"Our trial, however, is the first to assess the effect, tolerability and acceptability of aged garlic extract as an additional treatment to existing antihypertensive medication in patients with treated, but uncontrolled, hypertension."

Experts say garlic supplements should only be used after seeking medical advice, as garlic can thin the blood or interact with some medicines.

Ellen Mason, senior cardiac nurse at the British Heart Foundation, said using garlic for medicinal purposes dates back thousands of years, but it is essential that scientific research proves that garlic can help conditions such as raised blood pressure.

She said: "This study demonstrated a slight blood pressure reduction after using aged garlic supplements but it's not significant enough or in a large enough group of people to currently recommend it instead of medication.

"It's a concern that so many people in the UK have poorly controlled blood pressure, with an increased risk of stroke and heart disease as a consequence. So enjoy garlic as part of your diet but don't stop taking your blood pressure medication."

More on this story

Related Internet Links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.
Источник: https://www.bbc.com/news/health-11767440

Garlic is a staple in the average food pantry at home. Used to season dishes and add more flavour to sauces, garlic is versatile and widely used in most cuisines.

But did you know that consuming garlic can also be very good for your health?

Garlic is known for its immune boosting functions, lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, slowing cognitive decline and high antioxidant levels. Garlic contains the active compound allicin, that is reported to have anti-inflammatory properties and fights against free radicals. It is this beneficial compound that is extracted for garlic supplements.

Garlic is also an excellent source of manganese, phosphorus, copper, calcium, magnesium, selenium, and other essential minerals. Indeed, garlic has also been found to increase your body’s absorption of iron and zinc with its sulfur compounds.

Raw vs Garlic Supplements

While consuming raw garlic can contain all these health benefits, garlic breath is not one of them. Eating too much garlic can sometimes lead to indigestion and a pungent after-taste and smell in your mouth. That’s why most people who want all the benefits of garlic turn to garlic supplements instead as a convenient source of allicin compounds. 

Health Benefits of Garlic Supplements

In fact, garlic has so many health benefits that we recommend taking garlic supplements daily.

Heart Health

Garlic is reported to reduce systolic blood pressure, so it can help with keeping your heart and blood pressure healthy. It can also lower your cholesterol. 

In fact, it could be used as a substitute for those who want to normalise their blood pressure versus taking other synthetic medications. However, you do want to check with your doctor before taking any garlic supplements, as they may affect the effects of your current medication or increase their side effects.

Antimicrobial Benefits

Garlic has a variety of benefits against viruses, fungi and bacteria. It has been used in folk medicine as a home remedy against ailments like intestinal worms to ear infections. It is reported to guard against candida overgrowth, yeast infections, colds and viruses like HPV and herpes simplex. 

Source of Antioxidants

Garlic is a rich source of antioxidants that help to fight against ageing and disease by neutralising free radicals. Free radicals wreak havoc on your cells and cause premature ageing. By consuming garlic supplements, you can help your body fight against free radicals.

Boosts Immunity

Garlic boosts your immunity by stimulating the production of white blood cells to fight off infections. Garlic can help to ward off common colds symptoms and even help with Alzhemier’s disease and dementia.

Improves Gut Health

Interestingly, garlic is also known to feed good bacteria in your gut as a prebiotic, while reducing the amount of ‘bad’ bacteria, leading to overall balance in your gut flora. As your gut is linked to your immune function, this can also boost your overall immunity and guard against infections and illnesses.

Side Effects of Garlic Supplements

Although garlic has several beneficial effects, it can still cause side effects for certain groups of people. Garlic has blood thinning abilities that are good for those with high cholesterol or blood pressure. However, it can be unsafe for those with hemophilia or platelet disorders. 

Pregnant women or those about to undergo surgery are also advised to avoid garlic supplements.

Other side effects that have been reported by those taking garlic supplements include headaches, fatigue, loss of appetite, muscle aches, dizziness, and allergies such as asthma reactions or contact dermatitis.

What to Take Note of When Buying Garlic Supplements?

When buying garlic supplements, you should check if your supplement contains the compound allicin and how much, as the active compound that contains most of the health benefits of garlic.

You should also note how the supplements are absorbed into your body, as garlic is most effective when absorbed in the small intestine. When it enters the stomach, the acids may break down the supplement and its bioactive compounds without it being properly absorbed.

Why You Should Try Nature’s Glory Garlic Ball Supplements

Part of our Flu Immunity Pack, Nature’s Glory Garlic Ball Supplements are odourless garlic supplements that have been extracted without heat to retain all the health benefits. They are made into small ball-shaped supplements that are easy to suck, swallow or chew without any pungent taste. Furthermore, they contain both garlic and fermented black garlic for even better effects. The supplement also does not contain any gelatin or chemical coatings for better absorption in your body.

Effectively anti-inflammatory and antibacterial, Garlic Ball supplements are considered one of our top food-based supplements for overall health and immunity.

Tags: Garlic balls

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Источник: https://www.natures-glory.com/blogs/news/taking-garlic-supplements-health-benefits-uses

Fresh or capsuled? Researcher studies garlic’s potency as a supplement

By SARA SELIC

What good is garlic? And to reap any benefits, should you eat it in its odiferous fresh form or will a stink-free capsule suffice? Christopher Gardner, PhD, a researcher at the Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, is on a mission to find out.

Thanks to a grant from the National Institutes of Health, Gardner is conducting the most rigorous study ever to address a lingering controversy in the nutritional-supplement field: whether fresh garlic and garlic supplements — a widely consumed herbal supplement — lower cholesterol as claimed.

Food service workers carefully peel garlic in preparation for an unusual study conducted by Christopher Gardner. Gardner and his team are comparing the effectiveness of garlic taken in supplement form to garlic eaten fresh. Study volunteers must agree to eat a number of garlic-infused specialty sandwiches. PHOTO: COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER GARDNER

In preparation for the study — which is seeking volunteers and entails eating gourmet sandwiches six days a week — Gardner’s staff spent two weeks peeling, mashing and measuring 150 pounds of fresh garlic. That’s on top of the weeks they spent taste-testing a dozen custom-made sandwiches ranging from Portobello mushroom to chicken quesadilla.

The Stanford study differs greatly from the dozens of garlic studies conducted over the past four decades, Gardner explained.

While previous studies tested different garlic preparations with inconsistent and often inadequate potency, the Stanford researchers know the exact chemical composition of the garlic preparations they’re using and will monitor this throughout the study with periodic chemical analyses. And unlike previous studies, which tested just one garlic type, the Stanford study will evaluate the effects of two top-selling garlic supplements along with fresh garlic.

"This study goes far beyond the other trials, because we know exactly what we’re giving participants," said Gardner, assistant professor of medicine. "These results should help set the record straight."

For centuries, garlic has been touted for its disease-fighting properties. The most commonly claimed benefit is reduced cholesterol, although garlic is also said to reduce blood pressure, boost antioxidants and reduce the risk of certain cancers. Seeking such benefits without eating (or smelling like) garlic, millions of Americans take garlic supplements — pills containing powdered garlic or aged-garlic extract.

Meanwhile, researchers sought to determine whether garlic deserves its reputation. More than two dozen studies in the 1970s and ‘80s claimed to prove that garlic lowers cholesterol, but the studies were later criticized for poor design. They involved too few participants or didn’t include a control group, for example. When more-rigorous studies were conducted in the 1990s, most concluded that garlic offered little to no significant benefit.

Gardner said the question remains unsettled because chemical analyses conducted by Larry Lawson, PhD, a biochemist and co-investigator for Stanford’s study, revealed serious flaws in the formulations of the garlic supplements used in past studies. The key issue is allicin, an enzyme that is garlic’s active ingredient.

When a person eats fresh garlic, allicin is released by chewing or mincing the herb. It’s more challenging to get allicin from a garlic pill, however. In some cases, if the pills dissolve in the stomach, the garlic enzyme needed to produce allicin becomes inactivated.

Some pills, meanwhile, have an enteric coating, and these pills often pass through the body undissolved. "The problem is, all these studies didn’t really test garlic — they tested garlic supplements," Gardner said. "That’s not the same as eating garlic."

To select the fresh garlic for the study, Gardner traveled to Gilroy, Calif., the nation’s "garlic capital." An eight-person team spent two weeks peeling and mashing the garlic, then scooping it into 5-gram containers.

The premeasured garlic portions will be spread onto the gourmet "study sandwiches" that participants in the "fresh garlic group" must eat six days a week.

All other participants must eat the sandwiches as well, but minus the garlic. The six types of sandwiches used in the study were chosen in taste tests from a larger sample all custom-prepared by a chef. "This isn’t your typical clinical trial. It’s a lot of fun," Gardner said.

Participants in the Stanford study — 200 healthy adults with moderately elevated cholesterol — will consume the sandwiches along with study tablets for six months. Random assignment will be used to determine which combination of sandwich and pill will be given to each participant in the trial.

Participants’ cholesterol, blood pressure, blood-clotting ability and antioxidant levels will be monitored periodically.

Volunteers must be between ages 30 and 65 and in good health but have moderately elevated cholesterol (LDL of 130-190). And, they must agree to eat their allotted "study sandwiches" six days a week.

"We only want people who like our sandwiches," Gardner said, adding, "We’ve gone to enormous lengths to make sure they’re excellent."

Interested volunteers should call 725-5018 for more information.


Источник: https://news.stanford.edu/news/2003/january15/garlic.html

What Are the Health Benefits of Taking a Garlic Supplement?

The Health Benefits of Garlic

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]You may eat cooked garlic almost every day in your food, but did you know that raw garlic contains active compounds that could help you live a longer, healthier life? Garlic was used as medicine in ancient times and was even given to the original Olympic athletes in Greece to improve their physical performance. Modern research has proven the science behind garlic’s uses for enhancing immune function, lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, delaying cognitive decline, preventing cancer, and much more.

Raw garlic is easy to incorporate into your diet especially if you love the pungency it packs; but if you don’t like eating it raw, you can get the health benefits of garlic each day by taking a supplement. There are different types of garlic supplements out there with some being more effective than others. In this article, we’ll break down the distinctions between them and the various benefits they offer.

What Are the Health Benefits of Garlic?

1. Acts as a Natural Antibiotic

Historically, garlic was used in folk medicine to remedy a wide range of ailments from intestinal worms to ear infections. It was used as a natural antibiotic before modern antibiotics were invented, and recent studies show that garlic is able to kill antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. Because it also kills fungus, you can use it to fight Candida overgrowth, treat yeast infections, cure athlete’s foot, and more. It also kills viruses which helps fight colds, HPV virus (think plantar’s wart), and herpes simplex (think cold sores).

2. Fights Aging

Garlic in its raw form is a rich source of antioxidants which fight aging and disease by neutralizing free radicals. When free radicals overwhelm the body, they cause cellular damage and accelerated aging. By getting a daily dose of garlic, you can ensure you’re helping your body fight free radicals.

3. Boosts Your Immune System

Garlic also boosts immune function by stimulating the production of white blood cells which fight off infections. In fact, garlic extract is shown to lessen the length and severity of common colds. It also wards off neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and dementia and protects the health of your bones.

4. Provides Key Nutrients

Garlic is an excellent source of manganese, phosphorus, copper, calcium, magnesium, selenium, and other essential minerals. Garlic has also been found to increase your body’s absorption of iron and zinc with its sulfur compounds.

5. Improves Athletic Performance

Garlic enhances the function of your cardiovascular system and thins the blood so that more oxygen and nutrients can be delivered to your muscles when in use.

6. Protects Against Cancer

Garlic’s active compounds are shown to have anti-cancer actions that may help with cancer prevention.

7. Lowers Your Heart Disease Risk

With its ability to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, garlic may help prevent heart disease.

8. Helps with Weight Loss

By increasing the metabolism of fat and suppressing appetite, garlic can help with weight loss efforts.

9. Improves Liver Health

Garlic also reduces fat deposition in your liver, which helps prevent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Finally, garlic has detoxifying abilities shown to eliminate heavy metals from the body.

Garlic Benefits for Men

Research shows that a higher intake of garlic in men is associated with better prostate health. As men age, many experience prostate enlargement, or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). In one study, men who ate more garlic had a 28% reduced risk of BPH than men who avoided garlic.

Garlic Benefits for Women

Sadly, 1 in 8 American women develop breast cancer in their lifetime. Test tube studies have shown that garlic contains anti-cancer actions that are effective against breast cancer cells. A compound in raw garlic called allicin can induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells. In other words, it kills them. By killing cancer cells before full-blown cancer can develop or spread, raw garlic taken regularly may help with cancer prevention in women.

Allicin can be found in garlic pills, garlic oil, and garlic extract. However, you can also find allicin pills that contain allicin alone as a concentrated isolate. The World Health Organization suggests taking 2 to 5 mg of allicin daily to help protect against breast cancer.

Garlic as a Natural Aphrodisiac

By increasing blood circulation, garlic acts as a natural aphrodisiac boosting libido and improving sexual function. The allicin in garlic is shown to increase blood flow to the sexual organs helping to “wake up” and activate your sexual desire. Interestingly, one study showed that women were more attracted to the body odor of men who ate garlic as opposed to men who didn’t.

How Garlic Can Help Your Skin

The antimicrobial activities of garlic make it helpful for fighting acne and skin infections like athlete’s foot. Even taking garlic internally can improve the acne on your skin. Alternatively, apply garlic oil to your face after cleansing it, or even cut open a garlic clove and gently rub it over an acne lesion to kill bacteria naturally.

Garlic also fights the skin’s aging by neutralizing free radicals and increasing skin cell turnover—the speed at which your skin creates new cells. One clove of raw garlic per day or taking a garlic supplement may help delay the onset of wrinkles. It also reduces stretch marks and scars, even when taken internally. Applying garlic oil can also effectively fade marks.

Garlic for Better Hair Growth

Hair loss happens to both men and women, and so many of us are susceptible to its wide range of causes. Stress, a buildup of free radicals in your body, and a poor diet are some of the factors that can contribute to hair loss and thinning hair at any age. Eating raw garlic or taking a garlic supplement can give you the nutrients your hair needs to flourish including vitamins B6, vitamin C, manganese, and selenium.

Applying garlic oil to your hair or using a hair lotion or serum that contains garlic as its active ingredient is shown to reduce bald spots and promote hair growth. It increases microcirculation in your scalp so that hair follicles can get the oxygen and nutrients they need from your blood.

Research also shows that garlic fights heat damage and UV damage in your hair, so applying garlic oil as a conditioner can help keep it shiny, healthy and strong.

The antimicrobial activity of garlic also fights dandruff, which is often caused by bacteria formation in the hair follicles. Rake garlic oil through your hair from the scalp to the ends of your hair until the oil is thoroughly applied. Let it sit for 30 minutes to an hour before you wash your hair.

Garlic for Weight Loss

If you’re trying to lose weight, taking a daily garlic supplement can help support your efforts. To lose weight, you need to expend more calories than you consume. Garlic makes this easier on both fronts. It helps lower your calorie intake by acting as an appetite suppressant. Meanwhile, it makes you burn more calories by increasing your metabolism and stimulating your body’s fat burning process.

The Best Garlic Supplement for High Blood Pressure

Garlic is shown to reduce systolic blood pressure, so if you’re taking medication for your blood pressure, garlic supplements could potentially replace or reduce your medication. Of course, you’ll want to talk with your doctor before stopping your medication or starting with garlic pills while taking medication. If you’re interested in using garlic to help normalize your blood pressure, allicin pills are the best supplement option since allicin is the active compound known for garlic’s blood pressure-lowering effects.

Types of Garlic Supplements

When shopping for the best garlic supplement for you, you can quickly find yourself overwhelmed by the range of different options available. There are many garlic supplements out there, but they’re not all equally effective. Plus, the type you need depends on your specific health goals. Keep in mind that no matter what garlic supplement you get, it needs to come from raw garlic to be effective.

Avoid odor-free supplements because the garlic has typically been cooked, which destroys the antioxidants and active compounds. Whatever supplement you choose, make sure it has at least 4 mg of allicin per dose, so that you’re getting the benefits of its most bioactive component.

Benefits of Garlic Pills

Taking garlic pills allow you to enjoy the health benefits of raw garlic without the pungency of eating a raw clove of garlic. Plus, garlic is most effective when it enters the small intestine. When garlic breaks down in the stomach, the allicin in it starts to break down as well. Look for enteric-coated capsules when shopping for garlic pills because they allow garlic to pass through the stomach and into the small intestine, where the allicin can be better absorbed.

Here are two excellent options for garlic pills:

1. Puritan’s Pride Odorless Garlic Capsules

2. Sundown Naturals Garlic Softgels

Black Garlic Benefits

Black garlic is a type of garlic that has a higher allicin concentration. It also has twice as much antioxidant power as white garlic and a higher concentration of vitamins and minerals. Per pill, black garlic pills offer more health benefits compared to white garlic pills, so opting for them seems like a no-brainer.

Garlic Oil

Garlic oil is a great way to get the beauty benefits of garlic for your skin and hair. You can also take garlic oil internally as a tincture. Don’t confuse garlic oil with garlic essential oil, as garlic essential oil is a much more concentrated form of garlic and it isn’t a good source of allicin.

Garlic Powder

Garlic powder is made from dried raw garlic, and you can find it on its own as a supplement rather than in pill format. Unfortunately, digestion in your stomach can prevent the absorption of allicin from this powder when it’s not contained in an enteric-coated capsule.

Pickled Garlic

It’s hard to eat garlic raw because of its pungency, but pickling garlic makes it much more enjoyable. While pickling garlic allows it to remain raw, unfortunately, the allicin leaches out into the vinegar during the pickling process. However, many of the nutrients in the garlic stay intact.

Fermented Garlic Benefits

In some foods, the bioactive properties are enhanced by fermentation. This happens to be the case for garlic, big time. In a study, researchers found that fermented garlic had over 10 times the antioxidant power of non-fermented raw garlic. The fermentation of garlic also makes its nutrients more absorbable.

Amazingly, fermentation also increases the concentration of garlic’s most beneficial compound, allicin. To ferment garlic, fill a glass jar with peeled or unpeeled garlic cloves, add a tablespoon of sea salt, and fill the jar with water an inch from the top. Let the jar sit for a few weeks to ferment.

Aged Garlic Benefits

You can find aged garlic as a pill or extract, and it’s particularly helpful in improving heart health and immune function. Giving garlic the time to age in diluted alcohol, without heat, allows its nutrients and bioactive compounds, including allicin, to increase in concentration. Studies on aged garlic extract have shown that it effectively lowers cholesterol and blood pressure, reducing your risk factors for atherosclerosis, heart disease, and stroke.

Aged garlic also scavenges more free radicals than non-aged garlic, so it does more to fight aging. The aging of garlic makes its sulfur content more potent which makes it helpful for detoxifying arterial plaque and even heavy metals in your body.

Final Thoughts

When choosing a supplement, the allicin concentration, whether or not the garlic is enteric-coated, and whether it’s odor-free are all factors to consider. Supplements that are third-party tested can ensure quality which is important for garlic because its active components can be easily destroyed through an inferior manufacturing process.

Be sure to check with your doctor before trying a garlic supplement if you’re pregnant, nursing, or taking medications. Some medications do interact with allicin, including blood thinners.

Источник: https://nutritionrealm.com/garlic-supplements/

Is a garlic supplement good for you -

 

Did you know that garlic can do a lot more for you than make food extra tasty, or ward off stray vampires? Before you go stuffing your face with garlic bread, there’s a far more convenient — and healthier — option for getting in all the health benefits that garlic has to offer; it’s called odourless garlic.

Odourless garlic is an easy way to get the health benefits of garlic without the questionable breath. Garlic has been investigated thoroughly over the last decade resulting in over 1000 scientific studies alone. So, should you be supplementing with odourless garlic in your daily routine?

This article will go over the health benefits and potential side effects of garlic, and why you should think about adding odourless garlic into your supplement regime.

In this article, you’ll find:

garlic bulbs

What is odourless garlic?

Garlic  is an edible plant found in the allium (onion) species. It’s also a fantastic cooking ingredient for adding flavour that’s also associated with many health benefits. One of the main issues with eating a lot of garlic is that it can leave a pretty pungent smell and aftertaste. Thanks to modern-day science, there’s a convenient way to get the health benefits from garlic without the strong taste and smell. Odourless garlic is a concentrated form of garlic that comes in a convenient capsule. It’s released quickly into the bloodstream, but leaves no unwanted tastes or smells.

Health benefits of garlic

Garlic has been used in alternative health circles for many years. To date, there’s a growing body of scientific research that supports some of the uses in a more clinical setting.

Most of the health benefits of odourless garlic are from a compound in raw garlic called allicin. Allicin is destroyed when garlic is heated beyond a certain point. Raw garlic contains the active compounds that are associated with garlic’s health benefits.2

A supplement form of odourless garlic can preserve the health benefits of allicin, but the capsules must have a high allinase activity and disintegrate quickly for the compound to be active. 2  This means that the garlic capsules must break down quickly for you to get the health benefits from the supplement. If the digestion and gastric emptying is too slow then the benefits of the allicin are lost.

Now you might be wondering, what exactly are the health benefits of garlic?

 

1. Potentially lower blood pressure

Garlic has been shown over the years to have many powerful pharmacological effects on the cardiovascular system. Some studies have shown that having a diet high in garlic has a strong association with lower blood pressure. 4 Other studies have shown garlic to reduce systolic blood pressure and could help to prevent high blood pressure.4

Garlic has also shown some positive effects on blood triglycerides (fats in the blood) as well as overall cholesterol levels. Most of the benefits are seen in animal studies, which don’t always translate well to humans, but the results do look promising, so further investigation is needed. 4

 

2. Vasodilation

Garlic has been shown to help widen blood vessels which allows more nutrients to pass through them quicker. This is important and beneficial for overall health as it improves circulation and the efficient flow of nutrients transported throughout the body. 4

 

3. Antioxidant and neuroprotection

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals have strong links to many modern-day diseases such as unwanted inflammation. 3

Free radicals carry an unpaired electron which, when exposed to chemical processes in the body, can become hyper-reactive and cause damage to the body’s cells (known as oxidative stress). 3

Garlic possesses certain compounds which display a strong antioxidant effect and help “mop up” these unwanted free radicals and reduce oxidative stress on the body as a result. 3

Although studies are still limited, there’s a growing body of research on the use of garlic and its benefits to help protect the neural system.3

whole garlic cut open

Potential side effects of raw garlic

To date, there are not many known side effects of having garlic in your diet. The ingestion of 1 or 2 cloves of raw garlic a day is considered safe for most. 3 There have been some reports of flatulence or gastrointestinal distress if garlic is eaten on an empty stomach in high amounts. 3

If garlic is applied topically, there may be issues if you have an allergy. The most common reported side effect of garlic is bad breath and poor body odour. These can both be negated by switching to a form of odourless garlic instead. 3

 

Take home message

Garlic has been used for centuries for its associated health benefits and it’s modern pharmacological uses have been supported by some scientific studies. Odourless garlic has been shown to have many potential health benefits from helping to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease to neuroprotection.

By adding odourless garlic to your diet, you can get the best of both worlds. That means all of the potential health benefits, in a controlled amount without the unwanted odours.

FAQ

What is odourless garlic?

Odourles garlic is a concentrated form of garlic in a garlic in a capsule, with no unwanted taste of smell.

What are the health benefits of odourless garlic?

Health benefits of odourless garlic may include potentially lower blood pressure, vasodilation of blood vessels for improved circulation, and antioxidant and neuroprotection properties.

How does odourless garlic work?

The main compound with healh benefits is allicin, which is found in raw garlic. Allicin is destroyed when garlic is cooked, therefore a supplement form of odourless garlic may be preferable to cooked garlic to preserve the health benefits of allicin.

Our articles should be used for informational and educational purposes only and are not intended to be taken as medical advice. If you’re concerned, consult a health professional before taking dietary supplements or introducing any major changes to your diet.

Источник: https://us.myprotein.com/thezone/nutrition/odourless-garlic-what-are-the-benefits/

4 major health benefits of garlic, from boosting your immune system to lowering cholesterol

  • Garlic benefits include improving heart health and reducing the risk of certain cancers. 
  • One garlic clove also contains important vitamins and minerals like vitamin C, iron, and manganese.
  • To get health benefits from garlic, opt for whole cloves rather than pre-minced versions in jars. 
  • Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice.

Garlic is an easy way to amp up the flavor to many meals. And beyond its widespread use for taste and seasoning, garlic is also packed with key nutrients that may benefit your health. 

Here are four benefits of garlic and how much you should add to your diet. 

Garlic nutrition

One raw clove of garlic has roughly 14 calories, 0.57 grams of protein, and about three grams of carbohydrates (one slice of white bread has 34 grams of carbohydrates, for comparison.)

Though one raw clove of garlic is pretty small, there is actually a significant amount of the following vitamins and nutrients: 

  • Vitamin C (2.81 mg)
  • Selenium (1.28 mcg)
  • Manganese (0.15 mg)
  • Iron (0.15 mg)

One garlic clove packs a dense nutrient profile, but garlic's small size means we're not getting a large amount of nutrients from a single garlic clove. "The concentration is not as robust as we would think about, say eating a full salad," says Tom Holland, MD, a physician scientist at Rush University Medical Center.

You shouldn't add too much garlic to your diet, too quickly. "One to two cloves a day should be the maximum consumed by anyone," says Tracey Brigman, a food and nutrition expert at the University of Georgia. Eating more than that may cause upset stomach, diarrhea, bloating, or bad breath. 

"If you opt for adding two cloves of garlic a day to your diet, you may also want to add fresh parsley, mint, or raw apples to your diet to help prevent the bad breath associated with garlic consumption," Brigman says. 

1. Boost immunity

The flavorful bulbs at the end of the garlic plant are also rich with nutritious compounds called allicin and alliinase. In fact, the presence of allicin helps garlic boost the immune system. 

A 2015 review found that garlic fortifies the immune system by stimulating immune cells like macrophages, lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Garlic may also help stave off colds and flu because of the plant's antimicrobial and antibiotic properties, Brigman says, which would stop the growth of viruses, bacteria, and other unwanted organisms. 

However, Brigman notes that although some studies show a benefit, there is a lack of strong evidence that garlic supplements help prevent or reduce severity of the common cold and flu.

Related
How to boost your immune system through diet and lifestyle changes

You should still wash your hands, avoid touching your face, stay hydrated, and practice other methods to prevent getting sick. Garlic probably won't prevent sickness, but it may provide a little extra boost if you want to strengthen your immune system. 

2. Reduce cancer risk

"[Garlic is] also a good source of phytochemicals, which help to provide protection from cell damage, lowering your risk for certain cancers," says Brigman. 

Phytochemicals are compounds in vegetables and fruits associated with a reduced risk of chronic illness. There is some evidence that consuming phytochemicals through garlic can have anticarcinogenic effects and potentially lower risk for stomach and colorectal cancers. 

However, research in human subjects is lacking, and it's not proven that garlic consumption can actually prevent or treat cancer. 

3. Improve heart health

A 2019 study found that consuming two capsules of garlic extract a day for two months can lower blood pressure and decrease arterial stiffness for people with hypertension. 

"Garlic seems to lead to overall protection for your heart," Brigman says. 

In addition, a 2013 report suggested that garlic can reduce lipids in the blood, which means lower cholesterol and thus a lower risk for plaque build up in the cardiovascular system. 

Related
The best and worst foods to eat to lower cholesterol — and how the Mediterranean diet can help you

The amount of garlic needed to achieve these heart healthy effects differ among individuals. However, looking at the research available on the subject, it's best to consume about four fresh cloves of garlic per week, says Puja Agarwal, PhD, a nutrition epidemiologist at Rush University Medical Center. 

4. Enhance workouts

Historically, Ancient Greek athletes ate garlic before an event to improve their performance. That's because garlic releases nitric oxide, a compound that relaxes blood vessels and lowers blood pressure. This compound is often released while running to supply more oxygen to working muscles. 

Some animal studies in rats and mice have also found that garlic can improve athletic endurance, finds a 2007 review. However, Brigman notes the inconclusive data in human subjects means we can't draw definitive conclusions. 

Insider's takeaway 

Brigman says to opt for whole garlic rather than the pre-minced version in jars, as you will get the most health and medicine benefits from raw garlic.

This is because the alicin in garlic, which contributes to many of its health benefits, is most potent briefly after it has been chopped, crushed, or chewed. In fact, the amount of allicin in garlic cloves peaks 10 minutes after chopping and is destroyed by temperatures over 140 degrees Fahrenheit. 

"If you want to add garlic to hot meals, then add it when your food is almost finished cooking to limit the destruction of allicin," Brigman says. 

Allicin can also be consumed in supplemental forms, such as in pills, but the most benefit comes from raw garlic, Brigman says. This may be due to the fact that garlic supplements do not have regulated manufacturing standards and may actually contain little to no allicin. 

Источник: https://www.insider.com/garlic-benefits

What Is Allicin?

Allicin is a compound that may help ease swelling and block free radicals that harm cells and tissues within your body and lead to disease. The compound is one of the main active components of garlic and what gives it its distinct taste and scent.

Alliin is a chemical found in fresh garlic. An enzyme called alliinase is activated when the clove is chopped or crushed. This enzyme converts alliin into allicin.

Pure allicin only remains stable in freshly crushed or cut garlic for a short time. But letting garlic sit for 10 minutes after crushing or cutting it may help boost levels.

The compound is also added to dietary products to help preserve its effects.

This article will discuss the possible health benefits of allicin, any risks and side effects, and how to use it.

Commonly Known As

  • Allicin
  • Allium sativum
  • Garlic

Health Benefits

Allicin may help guard against health issues like heart disease and cancer. It may also protect against blood vessel damage by helping to lower your:

Some studies have also found that allicin may help your muscles recover faster after you work out. And the compound is thought to support immune health by warding off agents that cause illness, such as viruses and fungi.

Many studies have shown that the allicin in garlic may support health in various ways.

Support Blood Vessel Health

Studies have shown that the allicin in garlic supports blood vessel health.

It may help improve blood pressure (BP) control and keep the blood vessel disease known as atherosclerosis at bay.

A review of 39 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) found that regular use of compounds in garlic lowered people's cholesterol levels by about 8%. This would translate to almost a 40% lower risk of cardiac events for people at age 50.

It also helped lower the “bad fats” within your blood when taken for at least two months. Tests showed that adults in the study had lower:

A more recent review of studies also supports these findings. The results of eight of nine reviews found a marked decrease in total cholesterol.

Lower Blood Pressure

Research suggests that allicin may help lower blood pressure and keep it within a healthy range. 

In adults with high blood pressure who took garlic supplements, the mean systolic blood pressure (SBP, the top number in a BP reading) was around six points lower compared to people who took a placebo (sugar pill). Their diastolic blood pressure (DBP, the bottom number) was almost nine points lower.

A double-blind RCT published in 2021 backed up these results. Adults in the study received either placebo or two tablets with 400 milligrams (mg) of garlic daily for 15 weeks.

Those who took the supplements had a nearly eight point decrease in SBP and more than five point decrease in DBP at the end of the trial.

The people in this study were all living with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Along with high blood pressure, NAFLD is closely tied to other health issues such as heart disease and metabolic syndrome.

NAFLD impacts your liver over the long haul, but you may be able to keep the disease and the health problems tied to it at bay with lifestyle habits such as healthful eating.

Recap

Allicin may help you gain better control over your high blood pressure. Research has noted a decrease in SBP and DBP ranging from 2 to almost 9 mm Hg.

Protect Against Cancer

The National Cancer Institute praised garlic for its ability to guard against cancer in 1990. Since then, multiple studies have shown that allicin and other active garlic compounds may shield against some cancers and keep cancer cells from spreading.

Research has explored its role against cancers of the:

Possible Side Effects

Few side effects and health risks have been tied to allicin use. But be sure to talk with your healthcare provider about how it fits into your care plan before adding it to your regimen.

Discuss how the compound can impact your health or interact with any drugs and health aids you take such as:

  • Drugs, both prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC)
  • Dietary supplements
  • Herbal remedies
  • Essential oils

Allicin supplements have a few risks you should be aware of.

Digestive Issues

The compound may cause issues such as:

  • Belching
  • Gas
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Heartburn

Taking it with food may help limit or prevent these problems. 

Bleeding

Allicin may raise the risk of bleeding. That is because this and other garlic compounds help keep blood clots from forming. 

Be sure to talk with your healthcare provider if you also take a blood thinner such as warfarin and other herbal and OTC aids that can thin your blood such as:

  • Aspirin
  • Gingko biloba
  • Vitamin E

If you are due to have surgery or another procedure, your healthcare provider may recommend that you avoid garlic and products with its compounds for some time beforehand.

Drug Interactions and Precautions

If you have blood pressure or blood sugar issues and take medicines to manage these, be sure to talk with your health provider before you try allicin. Using allicin at the same time may cause your blood pressure or blood sugar to drop too low.

It is not known whether it is safe for certain groups to take the compound. This includes people with special health needs such as:

  • Pregnant women
  • Nursing mothers
  • Children

Recap

Allicin poses few known side effects and health risks. These may include digestive issues and risk of bleeding.

People with certain health issues and special health needs should check with their health provider before adding the compound to their health routine.

Dosage and Preparation

Products are sold in pill or tablet form and may have garlic or allicin on the label. They may also come in powder, oil, or extract form.

There is no standard dose for the compound. The dose can vary based on your health needs and the specific product. In general, it's best to follow the instructions on the label.

A single garlic clove has about 5 mg to 18 mg of allicin. The doses most often used in studies range between 300 mg and 1,500 mg.

Higher daily doses are often divided into multiple doses taken throughout the day. Breaking up doses may also help limit side effects.

Be sure to talk with your doctor about the dose that’s right for you.

What to Look For

Stomach acids can dissolve tablets and garlic enzymes before they have the chance to work. Coated tablets may help prevent this. 

But a 2018 review of garlic and allicin supplements found that tablets with enteric coating were not more bioavailable (able to be used and absorbed by the body) than those without it.

The study also found that allicin derived from garlic powder supplements was as bioavailable as those from equivalent amounts of crushed raw garlic when taken with a meal.

Supplements aren't regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, so their quality and potency can vary. Be sure the product has been certified by one or more of these agencies:

  • Consumer Labs
  • U.S. Pharmacopeia Convention
  • NSF International

Summary

Allicin is one of the main active compounds derived from garlic. It helps guard against certain cancers and may help lower blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure. It may help your muscles recover after a workout and protect against infections.

Allicin supplements have few risks. It might cause some stomach upset and increase the risk of bleeding. The safety isn't known for pregnant or breastfeeding women, or children.

If you're interested in trying allicin supplements, talk with your healthcare provider first about whether they're safe and likely to be beneficial for you.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Yes. But because allicin forms after garlic is chopped, you can boost the active amount by waiting at least 10 minutes before you cook it. It's also best not to expose garlic to heat higher than 140 degrees. One way to do this is to add garlic during the final stages of cooking.

  • Some studies suggest garlic may help prevent or treat colds. But current research hasn't determined what the effective dose should be.

  • There's no clinical proof that placing garlic cloves inside the vagina cures a yeast infection. It's best not to put any foreign object into your vagina other than a tampon or suppository prescribed by your healthcare provider.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. White D. Healthy uses for garlic. Nurs Clin North Am. 2021;56(1):153-156. doi:10.1016/j.cnur.2020.12.001

  2. Shang A, Cao SY, Xu XY, et al. Bioactive compounds and biological functions of garlic (allium sativum L.). Foods. 2019;8(7):246. doi:10.3390/foods8070246

  3. Doma K, Devantier-Thomas B, Gahreman D, Connor J. Selected root plant supplementation reduces indices of exercise-induced muscle damage: s systematic review and meta-analysis. Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2020;1-21. doi:10.1024/0300-9831/a000689

  4. Ried K, Toben C, Fakler P. Effect of garlic on serum lipids: an updated meta-analysis. Nutr Rev. 2013;71(5):282-99. doi: 10.1111/nure.12012.

  5. Schwingshackl L, Missbach B, Hoffmann G. An umbrella review of garlic intake and risk of cardiovascular disease. Phytomedicine. 2016;23(11):1127-1133. doi:10.1016/j.phymed.2015.10.015

  6. Ried K. Garlic lowers blood pressure in hypertensive individuals, regulates serum cholesterol, and stimulates immunity: an updated meta-analysis and review. J Nutr. 2016;146(2):389S-396S. doi:10.3945/jn.114.202192

  7. Soleimani D, Parisa Moosavian S, Zolfaghari H, Paknahad Z. Effect of garlic powder supplementation on blood pressure and hs-C-reactive protein among nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Food Sci Nutr. 2021;9(7):3556-3562. doi:10.1002/fsn3.2307

  8. Bayan L, Koulivand PH, Gorji A. Garlic: a review of potential therapeutic effects. Avicenna J Phytomed. 2014;4(1):1-14.

  9. De Greef D, Barton EM, Sandberg EN, et al. Anticancer potential of garlic and its bioactive constituents: a systematic and comprehensive review. Semin Cancer Biol. 2021;73:219-264. doi:10.1016/j.semcancer.2020.11.020

  10. Mondal A, Banerjee S, Bose S, et al. Garlic constituents for cancer prevention and therapy: from phytochemistry to novel formulations. Pharmacol Res. 2021;105837. doi:10.1016/j.phrs.2021.105837

  11. Lawson LD, Hunsaker SM. Allicin bioavailability and bioequivalence from garlic supplements and garlic foods. Nutrients. 2018;10(7). pii: E812. doi: 10.3390/nu10070812.

  12. Cleveland Clinic. 6 surprising ways garlic improves your health. Published Dec 7, 2020.

  13. Percival SS. Aged garlic extract modifies human immunity. J Nutr. 2016;146(2):433S-436S. doi:10.3945/jn.115.210427

  14. Lissiman E, Bhasale AL, Cohen M. Garlic for the common cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014;2014(11):CD006206. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD006206.pub4

Additional Reading
  • Ashraf R, Khan RA, Ashraf I, Qureshi AA. Effects of Allium sativum (garlic) on systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients with essential hypertension. Pak J Pharm Sci. 2013;26(5):859-63.

  • Chan JY, Yuen AC, Chan RY, Chan SW. A review of the cardiovascular benefits and antioxidant properties of allicin. Phytother Res. 2013;27(5):637-46. doi: 10.1002/ptr.4796

  • National Center for Biotechnology Information. Allicin. Updated November 6, 2021.

  • National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Garlic. Updated December 2020.

  • Oregon State University: Linus Pauling Institute. Garlic. Updated September 2016.

Источник: https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-benefits-of-allicin-88606

Discover our full range of health benefit guides, then check out some of our delicious garlic recipesand a video on how to crush garlic.

Nutritional Benefits

One clove (4g) of garlic provides:

  • 4Kcal / 16KJ
  • 0.3g protein
  • 0.0g fat
  • 0.7g carbohydrates
  • 0.2g fibre
  • 25mg Potassium

5 health benefits of garlic

1. Contains compounds with medicinal properties

Much of garlic’s therapeutic acclaim is down to an active compound called allicin. This sulphur-containing compound gives garlic its pungent smell and distinctive taste. Luckily for us cooks, the action of chopping or crushing stimulates the production of allicin. But, it is thought that the application of heat may inhibit some of the perceived medicinal properties, making it best to add garlic late in the cooking process.

2. May reduce the risk of heart attacks

Much research has focused on garlic’s potential in reducing the risk of heart disease and helping to manage cholesterol levels. Several studies suggest that garlic makes platelets (the cells involved in blood clotting) less likely to clump together and accumulate on artery walls; this means garlic acts like an anticoagulant and by so doing reduces the risk of heart attacks.

Garlic may also lower blood pressure through its ability to widen blood vessels, allowing blood to flow more freely.

3. May have anti-cancer properties

The sulphurous compounds in garlic have been studied for their ability to inhibit cancerous cells and block tumours. That said, much of the evidence for garlic in relation to colon, prostate, oesophageal and renal cancer is observational, with only small numbers of subjects included in the studies. As a result, the effect garlic has in relation to cancer remains uncertain and more studies are needed.

4. Has antimicrobial and antifungal properties

Garlic has a long history of use as an infection fighter against viruses, bacteria and fungi. It has been referred to as ‘Russian penicillin’ to denote its antibacterial properties, which is once again attributed to the compound allicin. Some skin conditions, such as warts and insect bites, may also respond to garlic oil or a crushed raw garlic clove.

5. May support bone health

Animal studies suggest garlic may minimise bone loss by increasing oestrogen levels in female rodents. A study in post-menopausal women found a similar effect when a daily dose of dry garlic extract (equivalent to 2g of raw garlic) was consumed.

Studies also suggest the consumption of garlic may give some relief from the inflammatory symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Is garlic safe for everyone?

Garlic poses few safety issues and allergies are rare. If you take garlic supplements for cholesterol management, have your cholesterol levels checked after three months. The recommended daily amount of garlic ranges from ½-1 whole clove per day (around 3000-6000mcg of allicin).

Please note that some people may experience indigestion, intestinal gas or diarrhoea when taking high doses of garlic.

Recipe suggestions for garlic

A simple aïoli is a great accompaniment for roasts, fish or as a dip:
Homemade aïoli
Salmon & prawns with dill & lime aïoli

Make your own delicious garlic bread:
Garlic & basil ciabatta
Quick tomato soup with cheesy garlic dippers

Cook with mushrooms:
Garlic mushroom burgers
Mushrooms on toast
Garlicky mushroom penne

Pair with prawns:
Stir-fry prawns with peppers & spinach
Lemony prawn bruschettas

Add flavour to mashed potato and stews:
Roast sweet potato squash & garlic mash
Garlic mash potato bake
Spicy root & lentil casserole

Garlic is great with chicken:
Garlic chicken with herbed potatoes

Want more? Take inspiration from our garlic recipes.


This article was last reviewed on 6 October 2021 by Kerry Torrens.

Kerry Torrens is a qualified nutritionist (MBANT) with a postgraduate diploma in Personalised Nutrition & Nutritional Therapy. She is a member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and a member of the Guild of Food Writers. Over the past 15 years she has been a contributing author to a number of nutritional and cookery publications including BBC Good Food.

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact your local health care provider. See our website terms and conditions for more information.

Источник: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/ingredient-focus-garlic

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Garlic 'remedy for hypertension'

By Helen Briggs
Health reporter, BBC News

Garlic may be useful in addition to medication to treat high blood pressure, a study suggests.

Australian doctors enrolled 50 patients in a trial to see if garlic supplements could help those whose blood pressure was high, despite medication.

Those given four capsules of garlic extract a day had lower blood pressure than those on placebo, they report in scientific journal Maturitas.

The British Heart Foundation said more research was needed.

Garlic has long been thought to be good for the heart.

Garlic supplements have previously been shown to lower cholesterol and reduce high blood pressure in those with untreated hypertension.

In the latest study, researchers from the University of Adelaide, Australia, looked at the effects of four capsules a day of a supplement known as aged garlic for 12 weeks.

They found systolic blood pressure was around 10mmHg lower in the group given garlic compared with those given a placebo.

Researcher Karin Ried said: "Garlic supplements have been associated with a blood pressure lowering effect of clinical significance in patients with untreated hypertension.

"Our trial, however, is the first to assess the effect, tolerability and acceptability of aged garlic extract as an additional treatment to existing antihypertensive medication in patients with treated, but uncontrolled, hypertension."

Experts say garlic supplements should only be used after seeking medical advice, as garlic can thin the blood or interact with some medicines.

Ellen Mason, senior cardiac nurse at the British Heart Foundation, said using garlic for medicinal purposes dates back thousands of years, but it is essential that scientific research proves that garlic can help conditions such as raised blood pressure.

She said: "This study demonstrated a slight blood pressure reduction after using aged garlic supplements but it's not significant enough or in a large enough group of people to currently recommend it instead of medication.

"It's a concern that so many people in the UK have poorly controlled blood pressure, with an increased risk of stroke and heart disease as a consequence. So enjoy garlic as part of your diet but don't stop taking your blood pressure medication."

More on this story

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Источник: https://www.bbc.com/news/health-11767440
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