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Is homemade mac and cheese bad for you


is homemade mac and cheese bad for you

Macaroni and cheese is a comforting dish that can also be healthy. Make simple swaps for the butter, milk, and pasta to lighten the dish. Is Homemade mac and cheese healthier than boxed? All the nutrition info makes a ton of sense if you think about it. That packaged cheese mix. Is your child driving you crazy at dinner time? Are you looking for a simple and healthy recipe for macaroni and cheese for picky eaters?

Is homemade mac and cheese bad for you -

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese

Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese recipe - Healthy & Creamy. This easy, homemade cheese sauce makes the perfect healthy Mac and Cheese using plain greek yogurt. Great clean eating recipe for kids or adults. / Running in a Skirt via @juliewunder

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese recipe: a healthy and low fat Mac and Cheese with greek yogurt, cheese, and a perfect spice blend.  It's homemade in one pot and is so good everyone will want seconds.  In fact, this is the BEST Healthy Mac & Cheese that's so easy to make you'll forget the Kraft box ever existed! 

Healthy, Simple Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese - The easiest homemade mac & cheese you'll ever make! / Running in a Skirt

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese Recipe

Mac and Cheese.  Just saying the words brings me all sorts of cozy feelings.  It’s not only my favorite comfort food... but America’s comfort food as well.  It's filling, comforting, and something that makes you feel so GOOD.  My version is a deliciously CREAMY Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese that is still surprisingly healthy, low fat, and low cal with a protein boost from the Greek Yogurt.

It's seriously creamy, cheesy, and with the perfect healthy spin.  I added enough spices to the magic cheese sauce to make it taste like the real thing though.

I seriously think this Healthy Mac and Cheese might be one of my all-time favorites.  Let's dive in!

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese recipe on a blue napkin.

Why you'll love this Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese...

I know making the box Mac and Cheese is easy.  I honestly do it too in a pinch.  BUT I swear if you keep the ingredients for this recipe around my version of the Healthy Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese recipe can come together even faster than the Velveeta OR Kraft box.  It's made in only one pot and takes less than 15 minutes from start to finish.  The magic happens when you melt the cheese into the greek yogurt creating the PERFECT creamy sauce without all the full of making a roux or anything like that.

Isn't it crazy how rich that cheese sauce looks without all the work???

Elbow macaroni with a creamy cheese sauce.

Ingredients in Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese

My Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese comes together with just a handful of ingredients and could not be easier or tastier.

  • Pasta: Buy your favorite kind but I love the classic macaroni noodle for this!  For extra nutrition consider buying whole wheat or one with added protein.
  • Greek Yogurt: Pick a plain greek yogurt.  For fewer calories pick a 0% or low fat but for a creamier final product pick 5% or whole milk.
  • Cheese: I like a quality sharp cheddar cheese for this to get that classic taste.  You can pick low-fat or whole milk depending on your preferences.
  • Spices: Dried mustard and a touch of paprika give this the classic Mac & Cheese flavoring.

The only other ingredient is some of the pasta water you cook the noodles in.  Pasta water has natural starches in it from the pasta that helps keep the sauce stay creamy and moist.  It also helps the cheese melt without a fancy sauce.

Overhead shot with macaroni with a healthy homemade sauce.

How to make creamy Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese?

Are you wondering how to make creamy greek yogurt Mac and Cheese?  It's surprisingly easy and here's a step-by-step guide!

  1. Cook your pasta according to the directions on the box.  Before you drain the noodles save ½ cup of the water the pasta was cooked in.
  2. Drain the pasta and return it to the hot pot.  Turn the burner off but leave the pot on the warm stove.
  3. Add the greek yogurt, cheese, and spices to the pot.  Add a couple of tablespoons of the pasta water.  Stir until the cheese melts.  If it seems a bit dry add a few more tablespoons of water.  I usually end up adding about a ¼ cup.
  4. Salt and pepper to taste.

It's that easy.  Honesty I think it's just as simple as any box but so much healthier.  I love knowing that I'm feeding my family something good.

Close up of Healthy Mac & Cheese

Variations on this Healthy Mac and Cheese

You can make your homemade and healthy Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese super good for you with some of the products you make it with or a bit more indulgent.  Here are low-cal, low-fat and gluten-free options.

  1. You can pick plain pasta, whole wheat, or protein pasta.  You can even make the dish gluten-free by picking a gluten-free pasta.
  2. You can pick a higher fat yogurt for a more indulgent meal.  A low fat yogurt will make a more low cal final product.
  3. Same with your cheese!  A whole milk cheese will make a creamier finished product.
  4. I love the classic sharp cheddar cheese but you can mix up the type of cheese you use for different flavors! Gouda or mozzarella is a great one too.
  5. For extra veggies stir in some spinach, kale, or even broccoli at the end.

Any way you make it the Greek Yogurt adds probiotics and protein!

Macaroni and Cheese on a fork that's made in one pot!

Low Fat Mac and Cheese With Greek Yogurt

To make a low fat Mac and Cheese with Greek Yogurt use the 0% greek yogurt and low fat cheese!  If you are watching calories this is a great way to have your favorite comfort food without all the calories.

 

Can I use Greek Yogurt Instead of Milk in Mac and Cheese?

YES! This recipe uses no milk and greek yogurt instead.  It allows you to get a creamy texture without making a traditional cheese sauce.  It's pure magic.

 

Mac and Cheese made with greek yogurt

This is really a one-pot wonder!  It is super easy to throw together after a run or on a busy day.   The creamy Greek yogurt allows the cheese to melt perfectly without milk or even making a fancy sauce.  It's such a fabulous shortcut.

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese recipe

In fact, this Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese might be the easiest Mac & Cheese you make... even as easy as the box with that questionable orange powder.  But this tastes better than the box and is better for you.  Just be careful with a delicious pot like this as it will be gone in no time.  It's twin and hubby approved.

My family eats it all in one sitting so I wouldn’t plan on having any leftovers!  If you do though it reheats well in the microwave.

 

 

Love healthy pasta recipes?  Also try...

 

If you make this recipe, I’d love to hear what you think! Leave a comment and a star rating ★ below. Make sure to follow me on Instagram, Pinterest, and Facebook too!

 

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese recipe

Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese

Julie Wunder
This Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese is easy, super tasty and surprisingly healthy for you! Look no further for the perfect Low Fat Mac and Cheese with Greek Yogurt.

Ingredients  

  • 2 cups macaroni elbow pasta
  • ½ cup reserved pasta water
  • 8 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
  • ½ cup plain Greek yogurt
  • ¼ teaspoon dried mustard
  • ¼ teaspoon paprika
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions 

  • Cook the pasta according to package directions. Drain and reserve ½ cup of the water you cooked the pasta in for the sauce. Do not rinse the pasta.
  • Turn off the burner and return the pasta to the warm pot, and add the cheese, greek yogurt. Add a few tablespoons of the reserved pasta water. Stir until the cheese melts and the pasta is coated. Add a few more tablespoons of the pasta water as needed until you get the right consistency.
  • Stir in the salt, pepper and spices. Adjust to taste.

Notes

This recipe can be super healthy with whole-wheat pasta, low-fat cheese and 0% low-fat Greek yogurt. This skinny variation works well and tastes great. To make it super creamy, use at least 2% Greek yogurt and regular cheddar cheese.

Nutrition

Calories: 380kcalCarbohydrates: 55gProtein: 26gFat: 6gSaturated Fat: 3gCholesterol: 14mgSodium: 363mgPotassium: 194mgFiber: 2gSugar: 3gVitamin A: 195IUCalcium: 283mgIron: 1mg
Keyword Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese, Healthy Mac and Cheese, Low Fat Mac and Cheese with Greek Yogurt

Pin for later...

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese recipe pin

 

Источник: https://www.runninginaskirt.com/greek-yogurt-mac-and-cheese/

The Biggest Mistakes You're Making With Mac And Cheese

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By Michael Sommers/Aug. 17, 2020 1:18 pm EST/Updated: July 29, 2021 10:31 am EST

Creamy yet crunchy. Smooth yet chewy. Utterly cheesy. Mac and cheese is the one of the simplest — and most satisfying — comfort foods of all time. For anyone who grew up making macaroni and cheese out of a box (which is practically everybody), there comes a time when you might feel ready to take a big leap forward: making macaroni and cheese from scratch.

"I've got this," you think to yourself. "Pasta, cheese, milk. Three ingredients. How difficult can it be?"

Warning! It's precisely this overconfidence in one's mac-and-cheese making abilities — combined with an underestimation of mac and cheese itself — that leads to so many disastrous outcomes. It's stunning the ease with which you can produce a flabby, mushy, bland, and grainy mess, simply by failing to use the right ingredients, ignoring techniques, and overlooking essential details. To save you from such humiliation — and a potential mac-and-cheese meltdown — we've compiled a list of expert advice to follow and fatal mistakes to avoid.

Making mac and cheese out of a box

First and foremost, let's get the big macaroni elephant out of the room. At the risk of coming off as an elitist or purist, we need to state that the most egregious mac and cheese mistake you can make is to rely on industrialized, boxed (or packaged) mac and cheese.

Yes, it's a convenient shortcut that avoids the complications of a roux and cuts down on dishwashing. Yes, it's cheaper than investing in quality pasta and bonafide cheeses, the kind that don't come in powder form or some glorious, otherworldly, radioactive shade of orange. And yes, you may argue that there are more artisanal, environmentally friendly and supposedly gourmet versions out there than the classic Kraft version — not to mention versions that are less caloric, more nutritious, and decidedly gluten-free. And you won't be alone. Social and digital media arbiters are only too eager to sing the praises of the best boxed brands on the market and suggest ingenious, easy ways to "upgrade" boxed mac and cheese.

But don't fall for these tactics. If you do, you'll be committing the original mac and cheese sin. Instead, stay on the true path by investing in honest ingredients and cooking from scratch. It's the only way you'll ever get to mac and cheese heaven.

Making terrible cheese choices for your mac and cheese

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Mac and cheese is a marriage between two much-loved ingredients: pasta and cheese. For the union to succeed, both partners have to be simpatico. This can only happen if you choose the right cheese.

Right away, you can eliminate Velveeta. Although a fervent minority is partial to its undeniable creaminess, in the words of the FDA, it isn't a cheese, but a "cheese product." That said, dissing "Liquid Gold" doesn't mean you should run out and invest in an exorbitantly priced Wyke Farms Cheddar. In a HuffPost article, cheese guru Janet Fletcher warned against using insanely expensive, refined, or unusual cheeses, the qualities of which will be lost when you melt them.

Instead of limiting yourself to a single cheese, opt for a carefully selected blend of cheeses that you can layer. Chef Danyelle Hudgins points out that successful mac and cheese "needs loads of flavor and depth. Using different cheeses allows you to taste layers of flavor combos."

Kitchn food editor Kelli Foster explains that some cheeses melt more easily and have a creamier texture and milder flavor. Popular choices in this camp included fontina, gouda, gruyère, and Monterey jack. Others are sharper and more pungent such as cheddar, Parmesan, and even Roquefort. The trick is to find a balanced mix of simple but good-quality cheeses. Author of American Cheeses identifies three schools of thought on mac and cheese — in all schools, the common denominator is cheddar.

Skimping on the cheese in your mac and cheese

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Assembling a stellar team of cheeses is key to earning accolades for your mac and cheese, but just as important as the type of cheeses you choose are the quantity and quality you use.

In terms of quantity, you need to be generous. By its very nature, mac and cheese is a cheese-heavy dish. If you want your mac to be lavishly coated in a thick, creamy blanket of cheese, you'll have to go heavy on the grater. Always grate more cheese than you think you're going to need (save any leftovers for other treats). Decadent? Yes. Then again, you're not going to be eating this every day (that's what Kraft mac and cheese is for). In the words of Kitchn editor Kelli Foster, "There's a time and place to go light on the cheese, but this is certainly not that time."

Moreover, make sure you actually do grate your own cheese. Sure, buying pre-shredded cheese is more convenient than doing it yourself. However, as Bon Appétit explains, any gains in efficiency will be offset by a loss in taste, texture, and quality. The truth is that pre-shredded cheese is frequently spiked with stabilizers and preservatives. While these ensure longer shelf life, the downsides include artificial flavors and frequently waxy textures combined with less melt-ability.

Using the wrong kind of mac for your mac and cheese

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Having sorted out the cheese, there's still the mac side of the equation to be settled. One of the earliest forms of pasta known to humankind, macaroni is a narrow tube-shaped noodle. In America, it's become indissociable from what is actually a subset of macaroni, elbow macaroni, the name of which comes from its resemblance to a bent elbow.

In "Macaroni cheese's mysterious origins," pasta sleuth Adam H. Graham traces mac and cheese's probable beginnings to the Swiss Alps where shepherds often combined home-made cheeses with pasta. Known as hörni, these ancestors of elbow macaroni were shaped like the horns of Alpine ibex.

Mac and cheese allegedly arrived in America courtesy of Thomas Jefferson, who returned from a European jaunt laden down with pasta recipes — and a pasta-making machine. In 1802, he was said to have served mac and cheese at a state dinner. However, it was Kraft that truly popularized the dish made with elbow macaroni when it launched its boxed version in 1937.

Since then, elbow macaroni has remained the standard. More than a matter of tradition or aesthetics, it's a question of engineering. Cheese sauce is too heavy for many pastas, causing them to clump. Elbow macaroni is designed to hold thick, creamy sauces. Its curves and grooves catch and hold onto sauce, maximizing cheesiness with every bite. For similarly strategic reasons, alternatives include other small and groovy pasta shapes such as conchiglie (shells) and campanelle (bells).

Making mac and cheese mush

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Choosing the right mac is essential, but it's all for naught if you don't cook it properly. First things first, make sure you only use (a decent brand) of dry pasta as opposed to fresh pasta, which, as explained in "The Science of Dried Pasta," will turn into a sticky clump.

Smithsonian Magazine's "Guide to Making Perfect Pasta" recommends bringing your water to a rolling boil and then tossing in at least one heaping tablespoon of (preferably kosher) salt, a step that will ensure your mac possesses some fundamental seasoning from the start (chef Mario Batali decrees that the water should taste like the sea). Do not, as Lidia Bastianich has famously declared, add oil to the water, since doing so can prevent the cheese sauce from sticking to the pasta.

Because many recipes for macaroni are double-cooked — boiled and then baked — you'll want to drain your pasta when it's just a minute or two shy of al dente. Anything more will result in flabby noodles lacking in chewiness and unable to absorb the sauce, i.e. a mushy mess.

Finally, when you do drain your cooked pasta, don't rinse it. This will wash away all the noodles' coveted starch, which helps bind the cheese sauce to the macaroni.

Sabotaging your béchamel for your mac and cheese

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One of the trickiest parts of the mac and cheese-making process is making the béchamel sauce. Considered one of the five classic mother sauces of French cooking, this thick white sauce was named after Louis de Béchamel, a steward of French king Louis XIV, who was also a noted gourmet. However, the sauce's origins can be traced to Tuscany, where it was evocatively known as salsa colla, or "glue sauce."

Béchamel sauce relies on a simple trio of ingredients: milk, butter, and flour. The combination of butter and flour cooked slowly over low heat is known as a roux. Despite the simplicity of the ingredients involved, béchamels are disaster-prone. For instance, the roux has a nasty habit of sticking to the bottom of the pan and burning while the béchamel is simmering. Chef's Notes recommends using a pot with a heavy bottom and stirring as if your life depends upon it (your mac and cheese certainly does).

Ina Garten's technique of warming the milk before adding it to the roux not only thickens the sauce in half the time but also reduces splattering that inevitably occurs when cold milk meets hot butter. Make sure you add the milk slowly, little by little. If you undercook your béchamel (ten minutes is a safe minimum), you risk giving it a gritty texture and raw-flour taste.

Using the wrong kind of milk for your mac and cheese

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When it comes to milk, percentages are everything. As Chef's Notes observes, when making mac and cheese, many of us idealistically, and erroneously, assume that all milk is created equal. However, using anything with less fat than whole milk — with a 3.25 percent fat content — is courting catastrophe.

The higher a milk's fat content, the more stable it will be during cooking. If you opt for reduced-fat (two percent), low-fat (one percent), or skim (zero percent) milk to make your béchamel sauce, there's a higher percentage chance of your mac and cheese acquiring an unpleasantly greasy texture and look. 

If you don't have any whole milk on hand, Chef's Notes recommends substituting cream (whipping or heavy) at a ratio of one part cream to three parts two-percent milk. Then again, if you're investing in cream, you may want to go all out in terms of fat content and use either light cream (20 percent fat), whipping cream (35 percent fat) or heavy cream (38 percent fat) to make what Epicurious describes as the "creamiest, dreamiest" mac and cheese sauce you can imagine.

Making a soup instead of a sauce for your mac and cheese

Almost as culinarily catastrophic as mushy mac and cheese is a soupy sauce. This major mishap can occur if you add too much liquid to what should ideally be a rich, thick, creamy cheese sauce.

Steer clear of disaster by adding liquids a little bit at a time, stirring them into the sauce until well-blended, and then taking stock of your sauce. If you find it to be a little on the sludgy side, you can always add a little more liquid, but subtracting is more difficult.

Similarly, never add your grated cheese all at once to your béchamel sauce. Whisk in each variety of cheese, little by little, stirring until the sauce is perfectly blended. Chef's Notes warns that if you add too much cheese, too quickly, your sauce can split or become unstable while cooking. This slow, steady method of blending also prevents cheese's natural oils from separating out from the sauce during cooking, creating unappetizing pools of grease.

Skimping on seasoning in your mac and cheese

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You might think that a brilliant selection of zesty cheeses is all it takes to make a flavorful mac and cheese. In reality, however, the best versions of mac and cheese benefit significantly from a behind-the-scenes boost of spices that add subtle notes while pumping up the flavor.

While butter, flour, and milk make a great base for a sauce, the resulting flavor isn't going to tempt you to lick the mixing spoon. Adding a judicious sprinkling of spices will enhance the flavors both of your béchamel sauce and of the completed mac and cheese.

Aside from salt and ground black pepper, favorite options include dashes of nutmeg and cayenne pepper for warmth and spark. A sprinkling of mustard powder and/or a blob of Dijon mustard are also zingy antidotes to blandness, as are garlic powder and onion powder. A dusting of paprika or turmeric adds a tinge of pungency as well as a healthy golden tint to the final cheesy color scheme.

Failing to maximize the mac and cheese crunch ratio

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Mac and cheese is more than just a marriage between pasta and cheese. It's also about the happy union of creaminess and crunchiness. Smooth macaroni in luscious cheese sauce truly comes into its own when paired with its culinary soul mate: a crackling browned topping.

Although creating a top crust of gratinéed cheese is one way of achieving such crunch, the consensus among mac and cheese experts is that you can't achieve maximum crunch without also using breadcrumbs for, what Bon Appétit's Rochelle Bilow describes as a "one-two punch."

On their own, hard, dry cheeses add sharp flavors but burn easily. Meanwhile, if left unaccompanied, soft, creamy cheeses will make a gooey mess without developing that desirable golden gratinéed look. Chef Vincent Menager recommends using a strategic mix of both types. Even though you're using cheese, make sure to season your breadcrumbs before tossing them into the mix. Melted butter, fresh parsley, crushed garlic, and onion powder are worthy additions that add welcome spice.

Guided by her belief that mac and cheese's crunch ratio should be an equitable 50:50 partnership, Food 52'sAmanda Hesser ups the crunch factor further by spreading her mac and cheese on a baking sheet and blitzing it under the broiler at the end of its bake. An alternative suggested by Bon Appétit's test kitchen is to use a wide, shallow casserole pan, preferably glassware, so you can monitor the browning of both bottom and top layers.

Refusing to let your mac and cheese take a rest

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It takes a very strong-willed individual to remove a fragrant, crackling, bubbling pan of mac and cheese from the oven and not succumb to its lure by immediately helping yourself to a big heaping bowl full of cheesy deliciousness.

However, despite appearances to the contrary, mac and cheese is not unlike a slab of beautifully grilled or roasted meat. The flavors and textures of both meat and mac hit their peak if they're allowed to rest for ten to fifteen minutes upon being taken out of the oven. According to culinary director Damon Menapace, taking a short siesta gives the cheese sauce an opportunity to calmly settle around the macaroni, burrowing into its nooks and crannies. If you don't let your mac enjoy this rest, the sauce will literally be a hot (and runny) mess.

It may be hard, but try to stop yourself from digging into that dish as soon as it comes out from the oven.

Taking yourself — and your mac and cheese — too seriously

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Yes, mac and cheese has been scientifically deconstructed and reconstructed by The Food Lab. But as every self-respecting toddler knows, at its essential level, mac and cheese is simple, gooey, delicious fun. To be true to the spirit of this classic comfort food, it's essential to keep its preparation as uncomplicated as possible.

Aside from seeking out arcane and expensive cheeses, such as the outrageously priced Wyke Farms Cheddar, this means stomping on any inner urge to fuss things up with foodie-friendly suggestions such as truffle oil and the ubiquitous lobster.

As part of our endless search for variety, the online universe is full of advice on how to "jazz up," "dress up," "spice up," "kick up," "amp up," and "pimp up" mac and cheese by adding everything from chorizo and figs to leftover chili, not to mention guacamole and tortilla chips. Such hacks are not only misguided (and in a few cases mildly disgusting) but completely unnecessary. As Brad Leone, kitchen manager of Bon Appetit's test kitchen, puts it: "Don't put a ton of crap in it."

That said, we're not endorsing the other extreme, exemplified by the young Florida man featured in a Vice documentary, who ate nothing but pure and unadulterated mac and cheese for 17 years.

Not thinking outside the mac and cheese bowl

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It may be considered culinary heresy to pollute a classic recipe with unnecessary bells and whistles. Yet once you've steered clear of all mistakes and followed all the steps required to make a perfect pan of mac and cheese, there's no rule that says you can only serve and consume it in a bowl.

As The Spruce Eats points out, since both mac and cheese and grilled cheese sandwiches rely on two basic ingredients — pasta and cheese and bread and cheese — it seems only natural to amalgamate these two cheesy and chewy classics into a grilled mac and cheese sandwich.

Perhaps less natural but equally inspired is the addition of mac and cheese to other iconic comfort foods. Layer a generous helping of mac and cheese onto a pizza crust, add some extra cheese, and blast it in the oven to enjoy a mac and cheese pizza. Press mac and cheese into a bun alongside a freshly grilled hot dog for a mac and cheese dog. Make a chewier variation of a cheeseburger by topping, or even filling, a juicy burger with mac and cheese. And if you're a real starch fiend, use mac and cheese to stuff baked potatoes. Ultimately, in terms of its appetizing possibilities, mac and cheese is endlessly adaptable — the only limit is your imagination.

Источник: https://www.mashed.com/237337/the-biggest-mistakes-youre-making-with-mac-and-cheese/

The Best & Worst Boxed Mac-and-Cheese Brands

Whether you're young or old, mac and cheese is a timeless classic that makes even the most diligent low-carb dieters weak at the knees. And with the ingenious invention of boxed macaroni and cheese dinners, even those who are slightly cooking-challenged can easily succumb to their favorite cheat meals any time of the day. But their ease of access and simple instructions shouldn't be enough to warrant an indulgence, as not every boxed mac and cheese is made the same.

In fact, with some of the calorie, sodium, and fat counts, many of these boxes of gold should make you think twice before you pick them off the shelf. You can thank the saturated-fat-laden butter, milk, cheese—or the scientifically-developed chemical alternatives to each of these natural ingredients—and refined-flour noodles for this dish's downfall. But not all boxes have to be sad mistakes for your diet.

We've compiled a list of the best and worst of the boxed mac and cheese available in supermarkets, so you can indulge in nostalgia without totally derailing your diet. Check out the list below, ranked from not so bad, to the worst of the bunch. And while you're taking a trip down memory lane, be sure to check out these 15 Classic American Desserts That Deserve a Comeback.

banza mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 210 calories, 3.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 660 mg sodium, 35 g carbs (6 g fiber, 3 g sugar), 14 g protein

Banza is made with chickpea pasta, which is naturally a healthier alternative. This variety, which happens to be gluten-free and vegan, comes in at whopping 13 grams of protein and a solid six grams of fiber per serving. Plus, it's the lowest-carb option on this list. And for a modest 210 calories? You can't ever really go wrong with this dairy-free option. While it is a bit higher in sodium than some others, overall, it's one of the best options out there. (You can't really go wrong with any of the Banza flavors, really!)

365 everyday value mac n cheese

Per 1 cup: 250 calories, 1.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 520 mg sodium, 50 g carbs (2 g fiber, 3 g sugar), 9 g protein

The Whole Foods brand you can easily order from Amazon comes in at a—dare we say—modest 250 calories per serving and is low in fat and saturated fat. Nine grams of protein isn't too shabby of a deal either!

market pantry mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 250 calories, 1 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 500 mg sodium, 52 g carbs (2 g fiber, 9 g sugar), 8 g protein

You'll find the Market Pantry at Target and while at first glance this mac and cheese seems not so bad, you want to keep in mind this whole box is a dinner size, meaning it has two and a half servings. If you end up eating the whole box at one time, you're downing 1,250 milligrams of sodium and 130 grams of carbs.

great value mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 260 calories, 1.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat), 570 mg sodium, 50 g carbs (2 g fiber, 8 g sugar), 9 g protein

Great Value is a brand sold exclusively at Walmart's grocery, and while it's great there is a GF option, this one isn't necessarily the best. With one serving containing a whopping 660 milligrams of sodium, you might have to think twice about this one, although it is rather low-calorie.

kraft macaroni cheese dinner original

Per 1 cup: 250 calories, 3 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 570 mg sodium, 47 g carbs (2 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 9 g protein

Oh Kraft, and that iconic blue box. While overall, it might not seem like it'll do too much damage, it's important to note that this variety does still have a rather high sodium count and it's brought to life thanks to that signature orange powder instead of, you know, actual cheese. One box does serve three people though so as long as you stick to the serving size, you don't have to feel too guilty about indulging in this childhood favorite every once in a while.

annies butter and parmesan

Per 1 cup: 270 calories, 3.5 g fat (2 g saturated fat), 630 mg sodium, 50 g carbs (3 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 10 g protein

Annie's is another beloved mac and cheese brand and while this flavor is made with creamy butter, real Parmesan cheese, and is said to "please even the pickiest of eaters," the sodium is still on the high side. Again, be sure to stick to the portion size and not eat the entire box in one sitting! Save some for later, or share it.

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annies alfredo mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 250 calories, 3.5 g fat (2 g saturated fat), 700 mg sodium, 47 g carbs (2 g fiber, 4 g sugar), 10 g protein

The major upside to this Annie's option is that it's made with real cheese from cows that aren't treated with growth hormone rBST. Wondering what exactly that means? rBGH, aka rBST, is a genetically engineered hormone that some farmers inject into their cows to boost milk production. But what knocks it down is the sodium, as one serving will cost you 700 milligrams. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 2,300 milligrams per day.

modern mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 320 calories, 1.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat), 600 mg sodium, 59 g carbs (4 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 16 g protein

Modern Table is known for its high-protein options and this mac and cheese does deliver that.

Our protein-packed Three Cheese Mac & Cheese combines the power of plant protein with the joy of comfort food. Lentils, rice and pea protein make up our gluten-free, protein-packed mac & cheese, plus a three-cheese sauce we call the triple threat.

kraft mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 320 calories, 3.5 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 670 mg sodium, 59 g carbs (2 g fiber, 8 g sugar), 12 g protein

Kraft took things up a notch with the white cheddar cheese pasta shell version of the beloved mac and cheese. While it might bring on a wave of nostalgia digging into a bowl, one serving is more than 300 calories and has more sodium than if you ate 55 Lay's potato chips.

velveeta original mac n cheese

Per 1 cup: 380 calories, 12 g fat (3.5 g saturated fat), 910 mg sodium, 52 g carbs (1 g fiber, 7 g sugar), 14 g protein

Don't let Velveeta fool you—while this mac and cheese is made with a packet of cheese sauce, it's not necessarily healthy by any means. From the 12 grams of fat and the ridiculously high amount of sodium, it's best to leave this "liquid gold" on the shelf. Keep in mind this is just one serving! You're much better off trying your hand at making your own mac and cheese from scratch.

velveeta mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 410 calories, 16 g fat (4.5 g saturated fat), 1,190 mg sodium, 51 g carbs (2 g fiber, 9 g sugar), 15 g protein

If you thought the Velveeta options couldn't get any worse, enter the broccoli rotini. You would think this would be a safer option, as adding vegetables to any pasta dish is always encouraged. But here, Velveeta is serving up a mac and cheese dish that is packing as much sodium as four and half medium-size orders of McDonald's French fries, making it the worst boxed mac and cheese option. Big yikes.

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Источник: https://www.eatthis.com/mac-and-cheese/

10 swaps for making mac and cheese healthier

mac and cheese
Grassmemo/Shutterstock
  • Macaroni and cheese is a comforting dish that can also be healthy.
  • Make simple swaps for the butter, milk, and pasta to lighten the dish.
  • Add items like lean protein and nutrient-rich veggies for a healthier, more flavorful mac 'n' cheese.

There's nothing quite as comforting as diving into a rich, creamy bowl of macaroni and cheese after a long day. Truthfully, we'd probably all love to enjoy this dish several times a week, but as it is laden with butter, milk, cream, and cheese, macaroni and cheese isn't the healthiest meal out there.

By playing with flavor combinations and ingredient swaps, you can add important vitamins and minerals while removing some of the heavier elements for more nutritious macaroni and cheese recipes that will nourish your body and soul.

Here are some tips for making your mac and cheese healthier.

First thing is first — choose homemade over boxed.

mac 'n' cheese
INSIDER

The packets of processed, powdered cheese in varieties of boxed mac 'n' cheese, have been found to contain phthalates. Many believe the chemicals can disrupt hormones, but more research is needed, according to the CDC. 

Either way, making your own mac and cheese is usually healthier and more delicious anyway. 

Swap pasta for whole wheat options.

pasta
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Whole wheat or whole grain pasta offers many more vitamins and minerals compared to white pasta. Alicia Romano, RD explained in Time that one cup of whole wheat pasta contains 23% of our daily fiber, while white pasta contains only 9%. Whole wheat pasta also provides 16% of your daily protein.

Switch pasta for a legume-based variety.

spinach pasta
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If you haven't tried legume-based pastas yet, you should really consider adding them to your cooking repertoire. These are great gluten-free options, and they can offer even more flavor than traditional pastas. Legume pastas offer four times as much fiber as regular pasta and around 33% fewer carbohydrates. Some varieties also offer as much as 50% of your recommended daily amount of protein.

Throw in your favorite chopped veggies.

mac and cheese
Larry Jacobsen/Flickr

Macaroni and cheese is a great vehicle for a wide variety of vegetables. Throw in broccoli, peas, carrots, mushrooms, onions. You can cook in tons of one type of vegetable, or get creative with an array of produce to up the flavor with fewer calories. 

 

Top your pasta with lean protein.

chicken cheese broccoli casserole
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Just as macaroni and cheese complements many types of vegetables, it also tastes delicious with plenty of different proteins. From chicken to roasted turkey to grilled tofu to beans, many protein options taste delicious atop a bed of macaroni and cheese. Protein is important in building and repairing tissues.

Sneak vegetables into the sauce.

mac and cheese
Igor Dutina/Shutterstock

Squash makes the cheese sauce for macaroni even creamier and more flavorful. Plus, squash such as pumpkin, butternut squash, delicata, and kabocha can add protein, magnesium, potassium, fiber, carotenoids, and vitamins C and B6. 

Use alternative milks.

Cheese Sauce
thepinkpeppercorn/Flickr

The cheesy sauce that accompanies macaroni and cheese often calls for milk or cream for a truly smooth finish. Don't be afraid to replace milk or cream with alternative milks, like soy, coconut, rice, almond, or flax milk. While they are often lower in protein than dairy milk, alternative milks are often lower in calories and fat with equivalent or higher amounts of calcium.

Cut down the cheese and replace with more seasonings

Cheese is delicious, and it can be a great source of calcium. But too much of a good thing can be bad for you. "Cheese does contain some important nutrients, including calcium and protein, along with vitamin B12 and zinc," said Kelly Pritchett, RD and spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "However, the calories can add up quickly if you aren't mindful."

To amp up the flavor while you cut down on the amount of cheese, use spices and seasonings. Garlic, onion powder, and paprika are all delicious additions, but feel free to experiment.

Substitute some of the cheese with plain yogurt.

pasta
NoirChocolate/Shutterstock

Along the same lines, you can cut down on the fat and get a boost of protein by replacing some of the cheese with plain yogurt. This will also add a flavorful tang to your pasta. 

More:FeaturesFreelancerFoodCheese
Источник: https://www.insider.com/healthy-mac-and-cheese-2018-12

In my book, Annie’s is the gold standard for boxed mac and cheese. I usually opt for Greek yogurt to mix in with the cheese powder because I prefer a creamier, tangier taste, but, for the vegan option, I stuck with almond milk. After straining and stirring in Annie’s sauce, which has a dark apricot color, I cautiously nibbled on a small spoonful of shells. And then another, followed by an entire bowl’s worth. This stuff is truly good, especially if you like sweet potatoes. The sauce, which Annie’s actually abstains from calling "cheeze" or "cheese," is a pumpkin-sweet potato hybrid (unlike Daiya’s, which is made of arrowroot and cassava), which gives it a creamy taste that I could definitely see myself opting for over cheese on healthier nights. To Annie’s: If you could somehow turn this sauce into a shredded “cheese,” I’d put it on pizza, tacos, whatever. This was easily the best dairy-free offering I tried.

Noodle: 4 / 5 Cheese: 4.5 / 5

Buy Annie’s Vegan Shell Pasta and Creamy Sauce, $2.58

Источник: https://www.bonappetit.com/gallery/6-healthy-mac-and-cheese-brands

Cheese making has been in practice for over 8,000 years by various cultures around the world. Throughout history, many animals have been valued for their milk, including camels, bison, goats, and yaks. Today, the majority of dairy production comes from cow’s milk, increasing by 50% over the last 40 years. While the percentage of milk consumption in liquid form has decreased, the popularity of cheese has been on the rise, with each person eating an average of 34 pounds a year as of 2012 (1).

However, not all cheeses are created equal. Most cheeses get a bad rap. We hear about how it is unhealthy, negatively contributing to our waistline and increasing the number on the scale. While all cheeses should be eaten in moderation, there are some that are a good addition to your shopping list, including swiss, feta, part-skim mozzarella, parmesan, and cottage cheese (2). These are a great source of many essential vitamins and minerals, and can help you avoid common health issues.

1. Cheese Can Prevent Osteoporosis

Our parents always instructed us to drink our milk as children, telling us that the calcium and vitamin D would help us to build strong bones. The truth is our bone mass continues to grow throughout childhood and adolescence, reaching its peak density around age 30. From there, the aging process begins to thin our bones over time. It is easy to see that the greater your bone density is at this point, the less effect aging will have on your skeletal integrity.

Unfortunately, inadequate bone mass can contribute to the development of osteoporosis later in life. Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by fragile, porous bones, and it affects over 10 million Americans, 80% of which are women. It is the leading cause of fractures, with 1.5 million estimated each year (particularly in the wrist, hip, or vertebrae). The cause can be attributed to low consumption or poor absorption of calcium, which causes the bones to slowly break down (3).

Balanced nutrition can help you avoid the development of osteoporosis. You need to ensure you are receiving adequate amounts or protein, calcium, and vitamin D. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a minimum daily intake of 400 to 500 mg of calcium per day for people over 50 and at risk for fractures (4). Dairy products, particularly cheese fortified with vitamin D, can be a great way to consume the correct balance of vitamins and minerals.

Bottom Line: Increasing your calcium and protein intake with cheese can keep your bones strong, and help prevent osteoporosis.

2. Cheese Can Have a Positive Effect on Your Dental Health

A study done by dental professionals showed that eating cheese might help to prevent dental cavities. Four groups were tested, consuming milk, sugar-free yogurt, paraffin, and cheese, and the pH balance in various areas of their mouths were tested before and after consumption. A pH level lower than 5.5 can leave your teeth at risk for erosion due to acids created in your mouth. While the groups who drank milk, and ate paraffin and sugar-free yogurt showed no significant change, the group who ate cheese experienced an increase in pH levels (5).

The findings may be the result of increased saliva production, due to chewing, which protects teeth from erosion. It could also be that certain components of the cheese adhered to the teeth, protecting them from acid. Either way, your teeth are made up of the same substances as your bones. Just as cheese is beneficial for your bone health, it can also have positive effects on your dental health.

Bottom Line: Cheese can keep your teeth strong and prevent expensive dental work that results from decay.

3. Cheese Consumption Can Help You Gain Weight in a Healthy Way

To most people, the idea of gaining weight is not something to be looked at favorably. For some, weight gain is a necessity for various reasons. Actors and athletes may need to bulk up for an upcoming role or game season, or a child may be underweight for their age, according to their pediatrician.

For those looking to gain weight, there is a right and a wrong way to do so. You do not want to put your health at risk by choosing the wrong foods. With its fat and protein content, plus the various vitamins and minerals it contains, cheese is a great choice for gaining weight in a healthy manner (6).

You do need to be careful about how much cheese you eat, as it can take you too far to the opposite extreme on the weight chart. It is a very energy-dense food, containing a lot of calories per gram. Common cheeses, like goat, gouda, and parmesan, contain over 100 calories per gram. Eating a diet mainly consisting of foods high in energy density can lead to obesity. Try to balance your cheese intake with low energy-dense foods, like fruits and vegetables (7).

Bottom Line: If your doctor has said that you or your child needs to gain weight, cheese can be a healthy way to achieve this.

4. Cheese is the Best Dietary Source for Calcium

The most abundant mineral in the body, calcium is a necessity for life. It regulates vascular function, nerve transmission, muscle function, and hormone secretion. While only 1% of the calcium in the body is necessary for these functions, the other 99% is stored in the bones.

Your bones go through constant remodeling throughout your life. The balance between breakdown and formation changes over time, with the formation greatly outweighing breakdown in childhood, vice versa in older adults, and a balance between the two in adolescence and early adulthood (8).

Our bodies cannot create new calcium, and we lose calcium every day through our dead skin cells, nails and hair, sweat, and excrement. It is important to get your recommended daily calcium (roughly 1,000 mg for the average adult (9)), as the calcium we do not receive through our food is then taken from our bones, leaving them prone to breaking down and vulnerable to fractures (10).

Bottom Line: Cheese is the best way, without supplementation, to receive your recommended daily intake of calcium.

5. Cheese is an Excellent Source of Protein

Responsible for the formation, regulation, repair, and protection of the body, protein is a necessity in our diets, giving you a strong immune system, healthy hair, and proper fluid balance in your body. Without proper protein intake, you are at risk for fluid retention and shrinkage of muscular tissue.

Your body does not store protein. Because of this, your daily food consumption should contain adequate amounts of protein. About 2-3 servings of protein-rich foods (such as meat and dairy) per day is adequate for most adults to meet the requirement (11).

While most cheeses are an excellent source of protein, low moisture-content cheeses are your best choice. If you are looking for the best cheesy source of protein, Parmesan is the one for you. It is the highest protein-content cheese, with 10 grams per ounce. Stay away from “wet” cheeses, like cottage, ricotta, and other cheese spreads if you are looking for protein content. These are very low in protein and high in fat (12).

Bottom Line: Cheese can help you receive your daily amounts of protein, giving you leaner muscle and healthier skin and hair.

6. Cheese is High in Vitamin B12

Vitamin B-12 (also known as Cobalamin) is the largest and most complex vitamin discovered to this day. It aids in the production of red blood cells, protein, and DNA, as well as promotes many mental health functions. Vitamin B-12 anemia, or pernicious anemia, is the result of a deficiency which can lead to lethargy, muscles weakness, and, in long-term, severe cases, neurological damage (13).

This essential vitamin can only be found, naturally, in animal products, or synthetically in supplements. It can be consumed in large doses with no ill side-effects. The excess merely gets stored away in the body until it is needed, and can be stored up to a year (14).

Many cheeses provide an excellent source of natural vitamin B-12. Amongst all cheeses, Swiss has been found to have the highest B-12 content, with 0.95 micrograms per ounce. That’s about 39% of your recommended daily intake. Even the cheeses with the lowest content, cheddar and Monterey, still offer 10% of your B-12 requirement in one ounce (15).

Bottom Line: Choosing cheeses, like Swiss, can energize you and keep your nervous system healthy through vitamin B-12.

7. Cheese Can Reverse Hypertension by Lowering Blood Pressure

There have been links found between a diet that contains dairy and lower blood pressure. It is believed that the increased calcium intake is what is ultimately responsible. There was a study done in which two groups, one who ate only fruits and vegetables and the other included low-fat dairy products, were tested. It was found that the group that included dairy showed overall decreased blood pressure.

Those with hypertension may find that their systolic blood pressure lowered by 2-4 mmHg by including certain cheeses in their diet (16). However, you do still need to be aware of your sodium intake, not exceeding 1,500 mg per day. Choose low-sodium cheeses by checking the packaging labels. Balancing your diet with foods high in potassium can help to reduce your sodium level as well (17). So, why not top that potato with some cheddar?

Bottom Line: Pairing low-sodium cheeses with potassium-rich foods can lower your blood pressure and reverse hypertension.

8. Cheese Provides the Essential Fat, CLA

Conjugated linoleic acid, or CLA, is a complex compound that does not get enough credit. With the trend of low-fat, no-fat diets, the intake of CLA amongst most Americans is very low. It is an essential, “healthy” fat that is commonly found in dairy and meat, primarily from grass-fed cows, sheep, and goats (18).

With the help of CLA, you can experience a loss of body fat and build lean muscle. It also plays a vital role in supporting the immune and inflammatory systems, improving bone mass, regulating blood sugar levels, and reducing your risk of heart disease.

Cheese made from milk from grass-fed cows tends to be high in CLA’s. The amount of CLA in these cheeses tend to increase with the amount of fresh grass eaten. Therefore, when cows have access year-round to fresh grass, you can have as much as 30 mg of CLA per ounce of cheese produced (19).

Bottom Line: Grass-fed cheeses are rich in CLA, which can regulate your blood sugar and reduce your risk of heart failure.

9. Cheese Can Help Prevent Common Cancers

There’s no doubt about it: cancer runs rampant throughout our population. Colorectal cancer is amongst the most common in the world, affecting the colon and digestive tract. Many complications come along with colorectal cancer, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, rectal bleeding, and, if undiagnosed, can lead to death in the long-run (20).

While many studies have shown mixed results when it comes to dairy consumption and cancer risk, there has been some evidence that shows milk and cheese can prevent some common cancers, such as colorectal and bladder. There are many factors to consider when it comes to diet and cancer prevention. When it comes to cheese and other dairy products, it is believed that the calcium, vitamin D, and lactic acid can potentially protect you from these cancers (21, 22).

Bottom Line: The calcium content in cheese can potentially help prevent common cancers, like colorectal.

10. Cheese is Plentiful in Healthy Fats

Once upon a time, we were told that fat was evil, causing us to be obese and clogging up our precious arteries. Thus, the low-fat, no-fat diets began to roll out, resulting in a population that was overweight and very sick.

Now we know that fats are essential to a healthy diet. They help to keep you full, so you eat less, and are necessary to help your body absorb certain vitamins. It is still only recommended that 10% or less of your daily calories should come from fat, and you should be selective with where your fats come from and what type of fats you choose.

Unsaturated fats are the best for you. These are typically found in nuts and fish. Saturated fats can also be good, but in moderation. These are often solid at room temperature, and are found in animal products, like meat, butter, and cheese, and certain oils, like coconut and palm. Trans fats should be avoided altogether, being undeniably the worst fat for your heart and found in fried foods and packaged snacks.

Cheese, in moderation, can help you get these necessary fats into your diet. Try choosing aged cheeses, like parmesan, and using it as a garnish to salads. The fats in the cheese will help keep you full and help your body absorb the vitamins in your vegetables (23).

Bottom Line: We now know that fats are essential in our diets, and cheese is a good source of healthy dietary fats.

11. Cheese is a Good Choice for Pregnant Women

Preeclampsia affects 5 to 8% of pregnant women in America. It is a condition in which a woman develops hypertension in pregnancy, and can have a serious impact on her unborn child, including death. Through various studies and research, it has been shown, however, that calcium supplementation, receiving between 1,500 and 2,000 mg per day, during pregnancy can greatly reduce a woman’s risk of developing preeclampsia (24).

With its calcium content, cheese is a good choice for the pregnant woman’s diet. Not only is it rich in calcium, but it can offer many other essential nutrients for pregnancy, including protein and B vitamins. However, there are many conflicting opinions on the consumption of cheese during pregnancy, and these need to be taken into consideration.

Some soft cheeses, due to their moisture content, can be the perfect environment for bacteria to grow. One of these bacteria, listeria, is especially dangerous for pregnant women and their fetuses. Listeriosis can produce symptoms similar to that of food poisoning, and the bacterial infection can even result in fetal death (25).

If you do choose to eat soft cheese, make sure it is in cooked food. The heat will help to kill the bacteria, making it safer for pregnant women to eat. If you really desire to eat cheese, but you are afraid of the risk of listeriosis, choose hard cheeses instead, like gouda, cheddar, and parmesan. These are usually made with pasteurized milk and cooked at high temperatures, which kill any existing bacteria (26).

Bottom Line: With proper choices and preparation, cheese can be a good choice for pregnant women to receive vitamins and minerals necessary for healthy fetal development.

12. Cheese Helps You Build Muscle

We all know how difficult it can be to lose weight, but for some people, it can be just as hard to put on muscle. Adding certain foods to your diet, however, can help you gain weight and bulk up. Cheese can effectively help you build muscle, due to its fat and protein content (27).

Cottage cheese is easily the cheapest addition to your diet that can help you build muscle. Per serving (about 4 ounces), you get 13 grams of protein, 5 grams of fat (in regular cottage cheese, not low- or no-fat), and 4 grams of carbs. It is a popular choice amongst many athletes and body builders, as the whey and casein protein keeps their muscles lean and aids in post-workout recovery (28).

Bottom Line: With the protein, fat, and carbs in cheese, you can gain weight and build muscle with ease.

13. Cheese Benefits the Immune System

Immunoesenescene is a disease that plagues the elderly, attacking their immune system, leading to its deterioration. It makes it harder for their bodies to fight cancerous cells and respond to immunizations and vaccines, leaving them more susceptible to cancer and infectious diseases.

Recent research, however, has shown that cheese, fortified with probiotic bacteria, can help boost the immune system and prevent immunosenescene. Probiotics are similar to the bacteria found in the human gut, where the majority of the immune system is located. Scientists, therefore, decided to target this area for their research.

A group of volunteers in a nursing home, between the ages of 72 and 103, were observed over a period of four weeks. One group was given a placebo cheese, and the other was given probiotic-rich gouda. At the end of the period, it was clear that natural and acquired immunity was improved in the group who ate the probiotic-fortified gouda (29, 30).

Bottom Line: Cheese, especially gouda, can improve the immune system by introducing gut-healthy probiotics to your body.

14. Cheese is Abundant in the Vital Vitamin K2

Vitamin K is well-known for the role it plays in helping your blood to clot, but there are a few forms of vitamin K. Vitamin K2 doesn’t get as much attention as K1, which is the K vitamin responsible for blood coagulation (called Koagulationsvitamin, understandably). It is believed to be the “unsung hero” when it comes to the prevention of some common diseases (31).

This vitamin works hand-in-hand with other vitamins and nutrients, such as calcium and vitamin D. It benefits your bone, skin, and dental health, by transporting and depositing these essential vitamins and minerals to these areas. It can help prevent dementia in the elderly by promoting healthy brain function. It can even prevent, and possibly treat, common cancers, like leukemia (32).

Many Americans (about 80%), and other Western populations, are believed to not get enough of this magical vitamin. The optimum recommended intake is still inconclusive, but it is believed that 180 to 200 mcg per day will be enough to get those vitamin-transporting proteins working. Hard cheeses, have adequate amounts of vitamin K2, offering over 30% more than soft cheeses, and amongst these, gouda and brie boast the highest amounts, at about 75 mcg per ounce (33, 34).

Bottom Line: Vitamin K2 is a miracle vitamin, believed to help prevent many common diseases, and gouda cheese is an excellent source for this vitamin.

15. Cheese is Good for Your Thyroid Health

Your thyroid, a small, butterfly-shaped gland in your neck, is probably not something you think about often, but it should receive special attention when it comes to your health. The hormones it produces regulate nearly all of the body’s metabolic functions. Too much (hyperthyroidism) or too little (hypothyroidism) production of these hormones can set your body off balance.

A thyroid disorder can have a vast array of symptoms. These include weight gain, fatigue, and infertility with hypothyroidism, and anxiety, insomnia, and rapid weight loss with hyperthyroidism. Both are cause for concern, and can lead to more serious problems in the future.

More than 30 million Americans suffer from a thyroid disorder, and over half of them are undiagnosed. Chances are even higher of an issue developing with your thyroid if you are female, making it about 30% more likely (35, 36).

There are many things you can do to prevent developing a thyroid disorder, such as nutrition. Selenium is an essential mineral, as there are many benefits that result from daily intake. You can experience boosted immunity, as it counteracts the development of viruses, and it regulates thyroid function by aiding in the production of thyroid hormones (37).

Changing your diet can be the first step to avoiding a thyroid disorder. Adding cheese to your diet can help. Hard cheeses, like cheddar, can be a great source of selenium. In a 100-g serving, you can get over 50% of your recommended daily value (38).

Bottom Line: Adding cheddar, and other hard cheeses, to your diet can reduce your risk of developing a thyroid disorder by keeping your hormones in balance.

Recipes

We all love cheese, and it’s easy to find many fattening, soul-soothing recipes. If you need your cheese fix, try these healthier alternatives.

1. Loaded Cauliflower

With all of the cheesy goodness this dish has to offer, you can enjoy your favorite comfort food without even noticing you’re eating vegetables.

In a microwave-safe bowl, combine either a whole head of cauliflower (then cutting it into florets) or a pound of pre-cut cauliflower and 2 tablespoons of water, cover with clear wrap, and microwave for 5-8 minutes, until tender. Drain the excess water and allow to cool for a few minutes.

Transfer the cauliflower to a food processor and blend until fluffy. Add ¼ teaspoon of garlic powder, 3 tablespoons of butter, and 4 ounces of sour cream. Blend again until the mixture looks like mashed potatoes.

In your serving dish, combine the cauliflower mixture and about 2 tablespoons of snipped chives, and mix in a ½ cup of shredded cheddar. Season with salt and pepper. Top the mixture with another ½ cup of shredded cheddar.

Pop it back in the microwave for a few minutes or put it under your broiler to allow the cheese to melt. Sprinkle on some chopped chives and serve.

2. Spaghetti Squash with Bacon, Spinach, and Goat Cheese

With the gluten-free trend on the rise, this recipe is a great trend for those looking for pasta without the carbs.

Preheat the oven to 400°F and line a baking pan with either parchment paper or foil. Prep your spaghetti squash by cutting off both ends, slicing it into 1-inch thick rings, and cutting out the seeds in the middle. Drizzle oil onto your lined baking pan, and spread out the squash rings, making sure both sides are coated with olive oil and seasoned with salt and pepper. Allow to bake for about 30 minutes, and cool for 10 minutes when it is finished.

Heat a large pan and cook about 6 strips of bacon (cut into 1 inch pieces) until it is browned and crispy. At this point, stir in a tablespoon of red wine vinegar (which will help to deglaze your pan and loosen any stuck pieces of bacon) and a tablespoon of maple syrup. Add a bag of fresh spinach to the pan, one handful at a time, while stirring over low heat. Once the spinach is wilted, remove from heat.

Peel the skin from your squash, then, using a fork or your fingers, separate the “spaghetti” strands. Add the squash to your skillet and toss together.

Top with goat cheese crumbles and serve warm.

3. Spinach and Goat Cheese Frittata

Add a little bit of cheesy goodness to your brunch with this recipe.

Preheat your oven to 400°F. In an oven-proof skillet, heat olive oil and add 6 slices of pancetta. Cook over medium-high heat until crispy. Allow to cool on a separate plate before crumbling into small pieces.

Slice up a small leek (length-wise then into ½ inch pieces) and add it to your pan. Cook over low heat until soft and slightly browned. Add a cup of fresh spinach and cook until wilted. Remove the leek and spinach mixture from the pan and allow to sit with the pancetta.

Beat 8 large eggs and add them to the pan, seasoning with salt and pepper, and cooking for about a minute. Spread the pancetta, leek, and spinach mixture over the eggs and top with about a ½ cup of goat cheese crumbles.

Bake for a few minutes until the frittata is set. Cut into wedges and serve immediately.

4. Skinny Mac and Cheese

Looking for some comfort food without the guilt? This mac and cheese recipe is sure to hit the spot.

Grate about a pound and a half of cauliflower (either a head cut into florets or pre-cut) into a large bowl. Measure out about 3 cups of the grated cauliflower and add to a slow cooker or Dutch oven with 2 cups of elbow macaroni and 2 cloves of sliced garlic.

In a separate bowl, whisk together 1 ½ cups of chicken broth, ½ cup of milk, and 2 tablespoons of flour. Pour the mixture over the cauliflower and macaroni, stirring everything together. Allow to cook until macaroni is tender. Stir in 1 ½ cups of grated cheddar cheese and a cup of low-fat Greek yogurt.

Top with more shredded cheddar, if you so desire, and salt and pepper, melting the cheese before serving.

5. Parmesan Kale Grilled Cheese

This healthy spin on classic grilled cheese is sure to satisfy even the pickiest of eaters.

Preheat your indoor grill or panini press (you can also use a grill pan on your stove). On a slice of bread, crumble a half-ounce of sliced parmesan and sprinkle hemp seeds and garlic powder. Top with sliced kale, another half-ounce of parmesan, slices of another cheese of your choice (something that will easily melt).

Lay your second slice of bread on top and place in grill or panini press and close. Allow to cook for a few minutes, until cheese is melted and grill marks are visible. Serve warm.

6. Parmesan Roasted Zucchini

Why eat French fries when you can enjoy this healthy and delicious alternative?

Preheat oven to 350°F and line a baking sheet with foil. Slice about 4 to 5 zucchinis into wedges (quarter them length-wise). In a separate bowl, mix together 2 tablespoons of olive oil, the zest of a lemon, and 2 cloves of garlic (minced).

Spread your zucchini slices on your lined baking sheet and brush with your olive oil mixture. Sprinkle with shredded parmesan and season with salt and pepper. Allow to bake for a few minutes, until zucchini is tender, then allow to broil until the parmesan is golden in color.

Serve as a snack or a side with your favorite dish.

7. Cottage Cheese Chicken Enchiladas

Instead of taco night, try serving up these creamy enchiladas with a twist.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Shred two chicken breasts, and combine it with ½ cup of chopped onion, and a can of chopped green chile peppers in an oiled pan. Sauté the mixture until brown, then add taco seasoning following the package directions.

In a large bowl, mix together ½ cup of sour cream, 2 cups of cottage cheese, and season with salt and pepper. In 6-inch soft tortillas, place a spoonful of your chicken mix, a spoonful of your cheese mix, and some shredded cheese, roll them up, and place them in a greased baking dish. Pour over enchilada sauce and sprinkle on shredded cheddar.

Allow to bake for about 30 minutes, until cheese is melted on top, and serve with Spanish rice.

8. Reuben Dip

Enjoy all the flavor of your favorite sandwich in this easy to make snack.

Preheat your oven to 350°F. Combine together a package of cream cheese (room temperature), ½ cup of mayonnaise, 2 tablespoons of ketchup, 1 tablespoon of horseradish, and 1 tablespoon of relish in a food processor, and blend until smooth.

Stir in 2 cups of grated Swiss cheese, 2 ounces of chopped corned beef, ½ cup of sauerkraut, and ¼ cup of chopped chives. Transfer to a baking dish, and allow to bake in the oven for about 15 minutes, until the dip is hot and bubbly.

Serve with pieces of toasted pumpernickel bread

Источник: https://livelyrun.com/from-the-farmer/15-health-benefits-cheese/

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese

Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese recipe - Healthy & Creamy. This easy, homemade cheese sauce makes the perfect healthy Mac and Cheese using plain greek yogurt. Great clean eating recipe for kids or adults. / Running in a Skirt via @juliewunder

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese recipe: a healthy and low fat Mac and Cheese with greek yogurt, cheese, and a perfect spice blend.  It's homemade in one pot and is so good everyone will want seconds.  In fact, this is the BEST Healthy Mac & Cheese that's so easy to make you'll forget the Kraft box ever existed! 

Healthy, Simple Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese - The easiest homemade mac & cheese you'll ever make! / Running in a Skirt

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese Recipe

Mac and Cheese.  Just saying the words brings me all sorts of cozy feelings.  It’s not only my favorite comfort food. but America’s comfort food as well.  It's filling, comforting, and something that makes you feel so GOOD.  My version is a deliciously CREAMY Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese that is still surprisingly healthy, low fat, and low cal with a protein boost from the Greek Yogurt.

It's seriously creamy, cheesy, and with the perfect healthy spin.  I added enough spices to the magic cheese sauce to make it taste like the real thing though.

I seriously think this Healthy Mac and Cheese might be one of my all-time favorites.  Let's dive in!

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese recipe on a blue napkin.

Why you'll love this Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese.

I know making the box Mac and Cheese is easy.  I honestly do it too in a pinch.  BUT I swear if you keep the ingredients for this recipe around my version of the Healthy Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese recipe can come together even faster than the Velveeta OR Kraft box.  It's made in only one pot and takes less than 15 minutes from start to finish.  The magic happens when you melt the is homemade mac and cheese bad for you into the greek yogurt creating the PERFECT creamy sauce without all the full of making a roux or anything like that.

Isn't it crazy how rich that cheese sauce looks without all the work???

Elbow macaroni with a creamy cheese sauce.

Ingredients in Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese

My Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese comes together with just a handful of ingredients and could not be easier or tastier.

  • Pasta: Buy your favorite kind but I love the classic macaroni noodle for this!  For extra nutrition consider buying whole wheat or one with added protein.
  • Greek Is homemade mac and cheese bad for you Pick a plain greek yogurt.  For fewer calories pick a 0% or low fat but for a creamier final product pick 5% or whole milk.
  • Cheese: I like a quality sharp cheddar cheese for this to get that classic taste.  You can pick low-fat or whole milk depending on your preferences.
  • Spices: Dried mustard and a touch of paprika give this the classic Mac & Cheese flavoring.

The only other ingredient is some of the pasta water you cook the noodles in.  Pasta water has natural starches in it from the pasta that helps keep the sauce stay creamy and moist.  It also helps the cheese melt without a fancy sauce.

Overhead shot with macaroni with a healthy homemade sauce.

How to make creamy Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese?

Are you wondering how to make creamy greek yogurt Mac and Cheese?  It's surprisingly easy and here's a step-by-step guide!

  1. Cook your pasta according to the directions on the box.  Before you drain the noodles save ½ cup of the water the pasta was cooked in.
  2. Drain the pasta and return it to the hot pot.  Turn the burner off but leave the pot on the warm stove.
  3. Add the greek yogurt, cheese, and spices to the pot.  Add a couple of tablespoons of the pasta water.  Stir until the cheese melts.  If it seems a bit dry add a few more tablespoons of water.  I usually end up adding about a ¼ cup.
  4. Salt and pepper to taste.

It's that easy.  Honesty I think it's just as simple as any box but so much healthier.  I love knowing that I'm feeding my family something good.

Close up of Healthy Mac & Cheese

Variations on this Healthy Mac and Cheese

You can make your homemade and healthy Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese super good for you with some of the products you make it with or a bit more indulgent.  Here are low-cal, low-fat and gluten-free options.

  1. You can pick plain pasta, whole wheat, or protein pasta.  You can even make the dish gluten-free by picking a gluten-free pasta.
  2. You can pick a higher fat yogurt for a more indulgent meal.  A low fat yogurt will make a more low cal final product.
  3. Same with your cheese!  A whole milk cheese will make a creamier finished product.
  4. I love the classic sharp cheddar cheese but you can mix up the type of cheese you use for different flavors! Gouda or mozzarella is a great one too.
  5. For extra veggies stir in some spinach, kale, or even broccoli at the end.

Any way you make it the Greek Yogurt adds probiotics and protein!

Macaroni and Cheese on a fork that's made in one pot!

Low Fat Mac and Cheese With Greek Yogurt

To make a low fat Mac and Cheese with Greek Yogurt use the 0% greek yogurt and low fat cheese!  If you are watching calories this is a great way to have your favorite comfort food without all the calories.

 

Can I use Greek Yogurt Instead of Milk in Mac and Cheese?

YES! This recipe uses no milk and greek yogurt instead.  It allows you to get a creamy texture without making a traditional cheese sauce.  It's pure magic.

 

Mac and Cheese made with greek yogurt

This is really a one-pot wonder!  It is super easy to throw together after a run or on a busy day.   The creamy Greek yogurt allows the cheese to melt perfectly without milk or even making a fancy sauce.  It's such a fabulous shortcut.

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese recipe

In fact, this Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese might be the easiest Mac & Cheese you make. even as easy as the box with that questionable orange powder.  But this tastes better than the box and is better for you.  Just be careful with a delicious pot like this as it will be gone in no time.  It's twin and hubby approved.

My family eats it all in one sitting so I wouldn’t plan on having any leftovers!  If you do though it reheats well in the microwave.

 

 

Love healthy pasta recipes?  Also try.

 

If you make this recipe, I’d love to hear what you think! Leave a comment and a star rating ★ below. Make sure to follow me on Instagram, Pinterest, and Facebook too!

 

Creamy Greek Yogurt Mac & Cheese recipe

Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese

Julie Wunder
This Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese is easy, super tasty and surprisingly healthy for you! Look no further for the perfect Low Fat Mac and Cheese with Greek Yogurt.

Ingredients  

  • 2 cups macaroni elbow pasta
  • ½ cup reserved pasta water
  • 8 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
  • ½ cup plain Greek yogurt
  • ¼ teaspoon dried mustard
  • ¼ teaspoon paprika
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions 

  • Cook the pasta according to package directions. Drain and reserve ½ cup of the water you cooked the pasta in for the sauce. Do not rinse the pasta.
  • Turn monthly mortgage interest calculator the burner and return the pasta to the warm pot, and add the cheese, greek yogurt. Add a few tablespoons of the reserved pasta water. Stir until the cheese melts and the pasta is coated. Add a few more tablespoons of the pasta water as needed until you get the right consistency.
  • Stir in the salt, pepper and spices. Adjust to taste.

Notes

This recipe can be super healthy with whole-wheat pasta, low-fat cheese and 0% low-fat Greek yogurt. This skinny variation works well and tastes great. To make it super creamy, use at least 2% Greek yogurt and regular cheddar cheese.

Nutrition

Calories: 380kcalCarbohydrates: 55gProtein: 26gFat: 6gSaturated Fat: 3gCholesterol: 14mgSodium: 363mgPotassium: 194mgFiber: 2gSugar: 3gVitamin A: 195IUCalcium: 283mgIron: 1mg
Keyword Greek Yogurt Mac and Cheese, Healthy Mac and Cheese, Low Fat Mac and Cheese with Greek Yogurt

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Источник: https://www.runninginaskirt.com/greek-yogurt-mac-and-cheese/

The Best & Worst Boxed Mac-and-Cheese Brands

Whether you're young or old, mac and cheese is a timeless classic that makes even the most diligent low-carb dieters weak at the knees. And with the ingenious invention of boxed macaroni and cheese dinners, even those who are slightly cooking-challenged can easily succumb to their favorite cheat meals any time of the day. But their ease of access and simple instructions shouldn't be enough to warrant an indulgence, as not every boxed mac and cheese is made the same.

In fact, with some of the calorie, sodium, and fat counts, many of these boxes of gold should make you think twice before you pick them off the shelf. You can thank the saturated-fat-laden butter, milk, cheese—or the scientifically-developed chemical alternatives to each of these natural ingredients—and refined-flour noodles for this dish's downfall. But not all boxes have to be sad mistakes for your diet.

We've compiled a list of the best and worst of the boxed mac and cheese available in supermarkets, so you can indulge in nostalgia without totally derailing your diet. Check out the list below, ranked from not so bad, to the worst of the bunch. And while you're taking a trip down memory lane, be sure to check out these 15 Classic American Desserts That Deserve a Comeback.

banza mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 210 calories, 3.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 660 mg sodium, 35 g carbs (6 g fiber, 3 g sugar), 14 g protein

Banza is made with chickpea pasta, which is naturally a healthier alternative. This variety, which happens to be gluten-free and vegan, comes in at whopping 13 grams of protein and a solid six grams of fiber per serving. Plus, it's the lowest-carb option on this list. And for a modest 210 calories? You can't ever really go wrong with this dairy-free option. While it is a bit higher in sodium than some others, overall, it's one of the best options out there. (You can't really go wrong with any of the Banza flavors, really!)

365 everyday value mac n cheese

Per 1 cup: 250 calories, 1.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 520 mg sodium, 50 g carbs (2 g fiber, 3 g sugar), 9 g protein

The Whole Foods brand you can easily order from Amazon comes in at a—dare we say—modest 250 calories per serving and is low in fat and saturated fat. Nine grams of protein isn't too shabby of a deal either!

market pantry mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 250 calories, 1 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 500 mg sodium, 52 g carbs (2 g fiber, 9 g sugar), 8 g protein

You'll find the Market Pantry at Target and while at first glance this mac and cheese seems not so bad, you want to keep in mind this whole box is a dinner size, meaning it has two and a half servings. If you end up eating the whole box at one time, you're downing 1,250 milligrams of sodium and 130 grams of carbs.

great value mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 260 calories, 1.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat), 570 mg sodium, 50 g carbs (2 g fiber, 8 g sugar), 9 g protein

Great Value is a brand sold exclusively at Walmart's grocery, and while it's great there is a GF option, this one isn't necessarily the best. With one serving containing a whopping 660 milligrams of sodium, you might have to think twice about this one, although it is rather low-calorie.

kraft macaroni cheese dinner original

Per 1 cup: 250 calories, 3 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 570 mg sodium, 47 g carbs (2 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 9 g protein

Oh Kraft, and that iconic blue box. While overall, it might not seem like it'll do too much damage, it's important to note that this variety does still have a rather high sodium count and it's brought to life thanks to that signature orange powder instead of, you know, actual cheese. One box does serve three people though so as long as you stick to the serving size, you don't have to feel too guilty about indulging in this childhood favorite every once in a while.

annies butter and parmesan

Per 1 cup: 270 calories, 3.5 g fat (2 g saturated fat), 630 mg sodium, 50 g carbs (3 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 10 g protein

Annie's is another beloved mac and cheese brand and while this flavor is made with creamy butter, real Parmesan cheese, and is said to "please even the pickiest of eaters," the sodium is still on the high side. Again, be sure to stick to the portion size and not eat the entire box in one sitting! Save some for later, or share it.

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annies alfredo mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 250 calories, 3.5 g fat (2 g saturated fat), 700 mg sodium, 47 g carbs (2 g fiber, 4 g sugar), 10 g protein

The personal banking pnc bank online upside to this Annie's option is that it's made with real cheese from cows that aren't treated with growth hormone rBST. Wondering what exactly that means? rBGH, aka rBST, is a genetically engineered hormone that some farmers inject into their cows to boost milk production. But what knocks it down is the sodium, as one serving will cost you 700 milligrams. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 2,300 milligrams per day.

modern mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 320 calories, 1.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat), 600 mg sodium, 59 g carbs (4 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 16 g protein

Modern Table is known for its high-protein options and this mac and cheese does deliver that.

Our protein-packed Three Cheese Mac & Cheese combines the power of plant protein with the joy of comfort food. Lentils, rice and pea protein make up our gluten-free, protein-packed mac & cheese, plus a three-cheese sauce we call the triple threat.

kraft mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 320 calories, 3.5 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 670 mg sodium, 59 g carbs (2 g fiber, 8 g sugar), 12 g protein

Kraft took things up a notch with the white cheddar cheese pasta shell version of the beloved mac and cheese. While it might bring on a wave of nostalgia digging into a bowl, one serving is more than 300 calories and has more sodium than if you ate 55 Lay's potato chips.

velveeta original mac n cheese

Per 1 cup: 380 calories, 12 g fat (3.5 g saturated fat), 910 mg sodium, 52 g carbs (1 g fiber, 7 g sugar), 14 g protein

Don't let Velveeta fool you—while this mac and cheese is made with a packet of cheese sauce, it's not necessarily healthy by any means. From the 12 grams of fat and the ridiculously high amount of sodium, it's best to leave this "liquid gold" on the shelf. Keep in mind this is just one serving! You're much better off trying your hand at making your own mac and cheese from scratch.

velveeta mac and cheese

Per 1 cup: 410 calories, 16 g fat (4.5 g saturated fat), 1,190 mg sodium, 51 g carbs (2 g fiber, 9 g sugar), 15 g protein

If you thought the Velveeta options couldn't get any worse, enter the broccoli rotini. You would think this would be a safer option, as adding vegetables to any pasta dish is always encouraged. But here, Velveeta is serving up a mac and cheese dish that is packing as much sodium as four and half medium-size orders of McDonald's French fries, making it the worst boxed mac and cheese option. Big yikes.

Eat This, Not That! Editors

Inspired by The New York Times best-selling book series, Eat This, Not That! is a brand that's comprised of an award-winning team of journalists and board-certified experts, doctors, nutritionists, chefs, personal trainers, and dietitians who work together to bring you accurate, timely, informative, and actionable content on food, nutrition, dieting, weight loss, health, wellness, and more. Read more

Источник: https://www.eatthis.com/mac-and-cheese/

Cheese making has been in practice for over 8,000 years by various cultures around the world. Throughout history, many animals have been valued for their milk, including camels, bison, goats, and credit one mail offer. Today, the majority of dairy production comes from cow’s milk, increasing by 50% over the last 40 years. While the percentage of milk consumption in liquid form has decreased, the popularity of cheese has been on the rise, with each person eating an average of 34 pounds a year as of 2012 (1).

However, not all cheeses are created equal. Most cheeses get a bad rap. We hear about how it is unhealthy, negatively contributing to our waistline and increasing the number on the scale. While all cheeses should be eaten in moderation, there are some that are a good addition to your shopping list, including swiss, feta, part-skim mozzarella, parmesan, and cottage cheese (2). These are a great source of many essential vitamins and minerals, and can help you avoid common health issues.

1. Cheese Can Prevent Osteoporosis

Our parents always instructed us to drink our milk as children, telling us that the calcium and vitamin D would help us to build strong bones. The truth is our bone mass continues to grow throughout childhood and adolescence, reaching its peak density around age 30. From there, the aging process begins to thin our bones over time. It is easy to see that the greater your bone density is at this point, the less effect aging will have on your skeletal integrity.

Unfortunately, inadequate bone mass can contribute to the development of osteoporosis later in life. Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by fragile, porous bones, and it affects over 10 million Americans, 80% of which are women. It is the leading cause of fractures, with 1.5 million estimated each year (particularly in the wrist, hip, or vertebrae). The cause can be attributed to low consumption or poor absorption of calcium, which causes the bones to slowly break down (3).

Balanced nutrition can help you avoid the development of osteoporosis. You need to ensure you are receiving adequate amounts or protein, calcium, and vitamin D. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a minimum daily intake of 400 to 500 mg of calcium per day for people over 50 and at risk for fractures (4). Dairy products, particularly cheese fortified with vitamin D, can be a great way to consume the correct balance of vitamins and minerals.

Bottom Line: Increasing your calcium and protein intake with cheese can keep your bones strong, and help prevent osteoporosis.

2. Cheese Can Have a Positive Effect on Your Dental Health

A study done by dental professionals showed that eating cheese might help to prevent dental cavities. Four groups were tested, consuming milk, sugar-free yogurt, paraffin, and cheese, and the pH balance in various areas of their mouths were tested before and after consumption. A pH level lower than 5.5 can leave your teeth at risk for erosion due to acids created in your mouth. While the groups who drank milk, and ate paraffin and sugar-free yogurt showed no significant change, the group who ate cheese experienced an increase in pH levels (5).

The findings may be the result of increased saliva production, due to chewing, which protects teeth from erosion. It could also be that certain components of the cheese adhered to the teeth, protecting them from acid. Either way, your teeth are made up of the same substances as your bones. Ww2 fnb mobi login as cheese is beneficial for your bone health, it can also have positive effects on your dental health.

Bottom Line: Cheese can keep your teeth strong and prevent expensive dental work that results from decay.

3. Cheese Consumption Can Help You Gain Weight in a Healthy Way

To most people, the idea of gaining weight is not something to be looked at favorably. For some, weight gain is a necessity for various reasons. Actors and athletes may need to bulk up for an upcoming role or game season, or a child may be underweight for their age, according to their pediatrician.

For those looking to gain weight, there is a right and a wrong way to do so. You do not want to put your health at risk by choosing the wrong foods. With its fat and protein content, plus the various vitamins and minerals it contains, cheese is a great choice for gaining weight in a healthy manner (6).

You do need to be careful about how much cheese you eat, as it can take you too far to the opposite extreme on the weight chart. It is a very energy-dense food, containing a lot of calories per gram. Common cheeses, like goat, gouda, and parmesan, contain over 100 calories per gram. Eating a diet mainly consisting of foods high in energy density can lead to obesity. Try to balance your cheese intake with low energy-dense foods, like fruits and vegetables (7).

Bottom Line: If your doctor has said that you or your child needs to gain weight, cheese can be a healthy way to achieve this.

4. Cheese is the Best Dietary Source for Calcium

The most abundant mineral in the body, calcium is a necessity for life. It regulates vascular function, nerve transmission, muscle function, and hormone secretion. While only 1% of the calcium in the body is necessary for these functions, the other 99% is stored in the bones.

Your bones go through constant remodeling throughout your life. The is homemade mac and cheese bad for you between breakdown and formation changes over time, with the formation greatly outweighing breakdown in childhood, vice versa in older adults, and a balance between the two in adolescence and early adulthood (8).

Our bodies cannot create new calcium, and we lose calcium every day through our dead skin cells, nails and hair, sweat, and excrement. It is important to get your recommended daily calcium (roughly 1,000 mg for the average adult (9)), as the calcium we do not receive through our food is then taken from our bones, leaving them prone to breaking down and vulnerable to fractures (10).

Bottom Line: Cheese is the best way, without supplementation, to receive your recommended daily intake of calcium.

5. Cheese is an Excellent Source of Protein

Responsible for the formation, regulation, repair, and protection of the body, protein is a necessity in our diets, giving you a strong immune system, healthy hair, and proper fluid balance in your body. Without proper protein intake, you are at risk for fluid retention and shrinkage of muscular tissue.

Your body is homemade mac and cheese bad for you not store protein. Because of this, state bank of india near me branch daily food consumption should contain adequate amounts of protein. About 2-3 servings of protein-rich foods (such as meat and dairy) per day is adequate for most adults to meet the requirement (11).

While most cheeses are an excellent source of protein, low moisture-content cheeses are your best choice. If you are looking for the best cheesy source of protein, Parmesan is the one for you. It is the highest protein-content cheese, with 10 grams per ounce. Stay away from “wet” cheeses, like cottage, ricotta, and other cheese spreads if you are looking for protein content. These are very low in protein and high in fat (12).

Bottom Line: Cheese can help you receive your daily amounts of is homemade mac and cheese bad for you, giving you leaner muscle and healthier skin and hair.

6. Cheese is High in Vitamin B12

Vitamin B-12 (also known as Cobalamin) www amway com usa en espaГ±ol the largest and most complex vitamin discovered to this day. It aids in the production of red blood cells, protein, and DNA, as well as promotes many mental health functions. Vitamin B-12 anemia, or pernicious anemia, is the result of a deficiency which can lead to lethargy, muscles weakness, and, in long-term, severe cases, neurological damage (13).

This essential vitamin can only be found, naturally, in animal products, or synthetically in supplements. It can be consumed in large doses with no ill side-effects. The excess merely gets stored away in the body until it is needed, and can be stored up to a year (14).

Many cheeses provide an excellent source of natural vitamin B-12. Amongst all cheeses, Swiss has been found to have the highest B-12 content, with 0.95 micrograms per apply for michigan unemployment benefits online. That’s about 39% of your recommended daily intake. Even the cheeses with the lowest content, cheddar and Monterey, still offer 10% of your B-12 requirement in one ounce (15).

Bottom Line: Choosing cheeses, like Swiss, can energize you and keep your nervous system healthy through vitamin B-12.

7. Cheese Can Reverse Hypertension by Lowering Blood Pressure

There have been links found between a diet that contains dairy and lower blood pressure. It is believed that the increased calcium intake is what is ultimately responsible. There was a study done in which two groups, one who ate only fruits and vegetables and the other included low-fat dairy products, were tested. It was found that the group that included dairy showed overall decreased blood pressure.

Those with hypertension may find that their systolic blood pressure lowered by 2-4 mmHg by is homemade mac and cheese bad for you certain cheeses in their diet (16). However, you do still need to be aware of your sodium intake, not exceeding 1,500 mg per day. Choose low-sodium cheeses by checking the packaging labels. Balancing your diet with foods high in potassium can help to reduce your sodium level as well (17). So, why not top that potato with some cheddar?

Bottom Line: Pairing low-sodium cheeses with potassium-rich foods can lower your blood pressure and reverse hypertension.

8. Cheese Provides the Essential Fat, CLA

Conjugated linoleic acid, or CLA, is a complex compound that does not get enough credit. With the trend of low-fat, no-fat diets, the intake of CLA amongst most Americans is very low. It is an essential, “healthy” fat that is commonly found in dairy and meat, primarily from grass-fed cows, sheep, and goats (18).

With the help of CLA, you can experience a loss of body fat and build lean muscle. It also plays a vital role in supporting the immune and inflammatory systems, improving bone mass, regulating blood sugar levels, and reducing your risk of heart disease.

Cheese made from milk from grass-fed cows tends to be high in CLA’s. The amount of CLA in these cheeses tend to increase with the amount of fresh grass eaten. Therefore, when cows have access year-round to fresh grass, you can have as much as 30 mg of CLA per ounce of cheese produced (19).

Bottom Line: Grass-fed cheeses are rich in CLA, which can regulate your blood sugar and reduce your risk of heart failure.

9. Cheese Can Help Prevent Common Cancers

There’s no doubt about it: cancer runs rampant throughout our population. Colorectal cancer is amongst the most common in the world, affecting the colon and digestive tract. Many complications come along with colorectal cancer, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, rectal bleeding, and, if undiagnosed, can lead to death in the long-run (20).

While many studies have shown mixed results when it comes to dairy consumption and cancer risk, there has been some evidence that shows milk and cheese can prevent some common cancers, such as colorectal and bladder. There amazon prime store card vs amazon credit card many factors to consider when it comes to diet and cancer prevention. When it comes to cheese and other dairy products, it is believed that the calcium, vitamin D, and lactic at home std test chlamydia can potentially protect you from these cancers (21, 22).

Bottom Line: The calcium content in cheese can potentially help prevent common cancers, like colorectal.

10. Cheese is Plentiful in Healthy Fats

Once upon a time, we were told that fat was evil, causing us to be obese and clogging up our precious arteries. Thus, the low-fat, no-fat diets began to roll out, resulting in a population that was overweight and very sick.

Now we know that fats are essential to a healthy diet. They help to keep you full, so you eat less, and are necessary to help your body absorb certain vitamins. It is still only recommended that 10% or less of your daily calories should come from fat, and you should be selective with where your fats come from and what type of fats you choose.

Unsaturated fats are the best for you. These are typically found in nuts and fish. Saturated fats can also be good, but in moderation. These are often solid i m still here sia room temperature, and are found in animal products, like meat, butter, and cheese, and certain oils, like coconut and palm. Trans fats should be avoided altogether, being undeniably the worst fat for your heart and found in fried foods and packaged snacks.

Cheese, in moderation, can help you get these necessary fats into your diet. Try choosing aged cheeses, like parmesan, and using it as a garnish to salads. The fats in the cheese will help keep you full and help your body absorb the vitamins in your vegetables (23).

Bottom Line: We now know that fats are essential in our diets, and cheese is a good source of healthy dietary fats.

11. Cheese is a Good Choice for Pregnant Women

Preeclampsia affects 5 to 8% of pregnant women in America. It is a condition in which a woman develops hypertension in pregnancy, and can have a serious impact on her unborn child, including death. Through various studies and research, it has been shown, however, that calcium supplementation, receiving between 1,500 and 2,000 mg per day, during pregnancy can greatly reduce a woman’s risk of developing preeclampsia (24).

With its calcium content, cheese is a good choice for the pregnant is homemade mac and cheese bad for you diet. Not only is it rich in calcium, but it can offer many other essential nutrients for pregnancy, including protein and B vitamins. However, there are many conflicting opinions on the consumption of cheese during pregnancy, and these need to be taken into consideration.

Some soft cheeses, due to their moisture content, can be the perfect environment for bacteria to grow. One of these bacteria, listeria, is especially dangerous for pregnant women and their fetuses. Listeriosis can produce symptoms similar to that of food poisoning, and the bacterial infection can even result in fetal death (25).

If you do choose to eat soft cheese, make sure it is in cooked food. The heat will help to kill the bacteria, making it safer for pregnant women to eat. If you really desire to eat cheese, but you are afraid of the risk of listeriosis, choose hard cheeses instead, like gouda, cheddar, and parmesan. These are usually made with pasteurized milk and cooked at high temperatures, which kill any existing bacteria (26).

Bottom Line: With proper choices and preparation, cheese can be a good choice for pregnant women to receive vitamins and minerals necessary for healthy fetal development.

12. Cheese Helps You Build Muscle

We all know how difficult it can be to lose weight, but for some people, it can be just as hard to put is homemade mac and cheese bad for you muscle. Adding certain foods to your diet, however, can help you gain weight and bulk up. Cheese can effectively help you build muscle, due to its fat and protein content (27).

Cottage cheese is easily the cheapest addition to your diet that can help you build muscle. Per serving (about 4 ounces), you get 13 grams of protein, 5 grams of fat (in regular cottage cheese, not low- or no-fat), and 4 grams of carbs. It is a popular choice amongst many athletes and body builders, as the whey and casein protein keeps their muscles lean and aids in post-workout recovery (28).

Bottom Line: With the protein, fat, and carbs in cheese, you can gain weight and build muscle with ease.

13. Cheese Benefits the Immune System

Immunoesenescene is a disease that plagues the elderly, attacking their immune system, leading to its deterioration. It makes it harder for their bodies to fight cancerous cells and respond to immunizations and vaccines, leaving them more susceptible to cancer and infectious diseases.

Recent research, however, has shown that cheese, fortified with probiotic bacteria, can help boost the immune system and prevent immunosenescene. Probiotics are similar to the bacteria found in the human gut, where the majority of the immune system is located. Scientists, therefore, decided to target this area for their research.

A group of volunteers in a nursing home, between the ages of 72 and 103, were observed over a period of four weeks. One group was given a placebo cheese, and the other was given probiotic-rich gouda. At the end of the period, it was clear that natural and acquired immunity was improved in the group who ate the probiotic-fortified gouda (29, 30).

Bottom Line: Cheese, especially gouda, can improve the immune system by introducing gut-healthy probiotics to your body.

14. Cheese is Abundant in the Vital Vitamin K2

Vitamin K is well-known for the role it plays in helping your blood to clot, but there are a few forms of vitamin K. Vitamin K2 doesn’t get as much attention as K1, which is the K vitamin responsible for blood coagulation (called Koagulationsvitamin, understandably). It is believed to be the “unsung hero” when it comes to the prevention of some common diseases (31).

This vitamin works hand-in-hand with other vitamins and nutrients, such as calcium and vitamin D. It benefits your bone, skin, and dental health, by transporting and depositing these essential vitamins and minerals to these areas. It can help prevent dementia in the elderly by promoting healthy brain function. It can even prevent, and possibly treat, common cancers, like leukemia (32).

Many Americans (about 80%), and other Western populations, are believed to not get enough of this magical vitamin. The optimum recommended intake is still inconclusive, but it is believed that 180 to 200 central illinois bank peoria il per day will be enough to get those vitamin-transporting proteins working. Hard cheeses, have adequate amounts of vitamin K2, offering over 30% more than soft cheeses, and amongst these, gouda and brie boast the highest amounts, at about 75 mcg per ounce (33, 34).

Bottom Line: Vitamin K2 is a miracle vitamin, believed to help prevent many common diseases, and gouda cheese is an excellent source for this vitamin.

15. Cheese is Good for Your Thyroid Health

Your thyroid, a small, butterfly-shaped gland in your neck, is probably not something you think about often, but it should receive special attention when it comes to your health. The hormones it produces regulate nearly all of the body’s metabolic functions. Too much (hyperthyroidism) or too little (hypothyroidism) production of these hormones can set your body off balance.

A thyroid disorder can have a vast array of symptoms. These include weight gain, fatigue, and infertility with hypothyroidism, and anxiety, insomnia, and rapid weight loss with hyperthyroidism. Both are cause for concern, and can lead to more serious problems in christmas club savings account chase bank future.

More than 30 million Americans suffer from a thyroid disorder, and over half of them are undiagnosed. Chances are even higher of an issue developing with your thyroid if you are female, making it about 30% more likely (35, 36).

There are many things you can do to prevent developing a thyroid disorder, such as nutrition. Selenium is an essential mineral, as there are many benefits that result from daily intake. You can experience boosted immunity, as it counteracts the development of viruses, and it regulates thyroid function by aiding in the production of thyroid hormones (37).

Changing your diet can be the first step to avoiding a thyroid disorder. Adding cheese to your diet can help. Hard cheeses, like cheddar, can be a great source of selenium. In a 100-g serving, you can get over 50% of your recommended daily value (38).

Bottom Line: Adding cheddar, and other hard cheeses, to your diet can reduce your risk of developing a thyroid disorder by keeping your hormones in balance.

Recipes

We all love cheese, and it’s easy to find many fattening, soul-soothing recipes. If you need your cheese fix, try these healthier alternatives.

1. Loaded Cauliflower

With all of the cheesy goodness this dish has to offer, you can enjoy your favorite comfort food without even noticing you’re eating vegetables.

In a microwave-safe bowl, combine either a whole head of cauliflower (then cutting it into florets) or a pound of pre-cut cauliflower and 2 tablespoons of water, cover with clear wrap, and microwave for 5-8 minutes, until tender. Drain the excess water and allow to cool for a few minutes.

Transfer the cauliflower to a food processor and blend until fluffy. Add ¼ teaspoon of garlic powder, 3 tablespoons of butter, and 4 ounces of sour cream. Blend again until the mixture looks like mashed potatoes.

In your serving dish, combine the cauliflower mixture and about 2 tablespoons of snipped chives, and mix in a ½ cup of shredded cheddar. Season with salt and pepper. Top the mixture with another ½ cup of shredded cheddar.

Pop it back in the microwave for a few minutes or put it under your broiler to allow the cheese to melt. Sprinkle on some chopped chives and serve.

2. Spaghetti Squash with Bacon, Spinach, and Goat Cheese

With the gluten-free trend on the rise, this recipe is a great trend for those looking for pasta without the carbs.

Preheat the oven to 400°F and line a baking pan with either parchment paper or foil. Prep your spaghetti squash by cutting off both ends, slicing it into 1-inch thick rings, and cutting out the seeds in the middle. Drizzle oil onto your lined baking pan, and spread out the squash rings, making sure both sides are coated with olive oil and seasoned with salt and pepper. Allow to bake for about 30 minutes, and cool for 10 minutes when it is finished.

Heat a large pan and cook about 6 strips of bacon (cut into 1 inch pieces) until it is browned and crispy. At this point, stir in a tablespoon of red wine vinegar (which will help to deglaze your pan and loosen any stuck pieces of bacon) and a tablespoon of maple syrup. Add a bag of fresh spinach to the pan, one handful at a time, while stirring over low heat. Once the spinach is wilted, remove from heat.

Peel the skin from your squash, then, using a fork or your fingers, separate the “spaghetti” strands. Add the squash to your skillet and toss together.

Top with goat cheese crumbles and serve warm.

3. Spinach and Goat Cheese Frittata

Add a little bit of cheesy goodness to your brunch with this recipe.

Preheat your oven to 400°F. In an oven-proof skillet, heat olive oil and add 6 slices of pancetta. Cook over medium-high heat until crispy. Allow to cool on a separate plate before crumbling into small pieces.

Slice up a small leek (length-wise then into ½ inch pieces) and add it to your what is the phone number for xfinity. Cook over low heat until soft and slightly browned. Add a cup of fresh spinach and cook until wilted. Remove the leek and spinach mixture from the pan and allow to sit with the pancetta.

Beat 8 large eggs and add them to the pan, seasoning with salt and pepper, and cooking for about a minute. Spread the pancetta, leek, and spinach mixture over the eggs and top with about a ½ cup of goat cheese crumbles.

Bake for a few minutes until the frittata is set. Cut into wedges and serve immediately.

4. Skinny Mac and Cheese

Looking for some comfort food without the guilt? This mac and cheese recipe is sure to hit the spot.

Grate about a pound and a half of cauliflower (either a head cut into florets or pre-cut) into a large bowl. Measure out about 3 cups of the grated cauliflower and add to a slow cooker or Dutch oven with 2 cups of elbow macaroni and 2 cloves of sliced garlic.

In a separate bowl, whisk together 1 ½ cups of chicken broth, ½ cup of milk, and 2 tablespoons of flour. Pour the mixture over the cauliflower and macaroni, stirring everything together. Allow to cook until macaroni is tender. Stir in 1 ½ cups of grated cheddar cheese and a cup of low-fat Greek yogurt.

Top with more shredded cheddar, if you so desire, and salt and pepper, melting the cheese before serving.

5. Parmesan Kale Grilled Cheese

This healthy spin on classic grilled cheese is sure to satisfy even the pickiest of eaters.

Preheat your indoor grill or panini press (you can also use a grill pan on your stove). On a slice of bread, crumble a half-ounce of sliced parmesan and sprinkle hemp seeds and garlic powder. Top with sliced kale, another half-ounce of parmesan, slices of another cheese of your choice (something that will easily melt).

Lay your second slice of bread on top and place in grill or panini press and close. Allow to cook for a few minutes, until cheese is melted and grill marks are visible. Serve warm.

6. Parmesan Roasted Zucchini

Why eat French fries when you can enjoy this healthy and delicious alternative?

Preheat oven to 350°F and line a baking sheet with foil. Slice about 4 to 5 zucchinis into wedges (quarter them length-wise). In a separate bowl, mix together 2 tablespoons of olive oil, the zest of a lemon, and 2 cloves of garlic (minced).

Spread your zucchini slices on your lined baking sheet and brush with your olive oil mixture. Sprinkle with shredded parmesan and season with salt and pepper. Allow to bake for a few minutes, until zucchini is tender, then allow to broil until the parmesan is golden in color.

Serve as a snack or a side with your favorite dish.

7. Cottage Cheese Chicken Enchiladas

Instead of taco night, try serving up these creamy enchiladas with a twist.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Shred two chicken breasts, and combine it with ½ cup of chopped onion, and a can of chopped green chile peppers in an oiled pan. Sauté the mixture until brown, then add taco seasoning following the package directions.

In a large bowl, mix together ½ cup of sour cream, 2 cups of cottage cheese, and season june 1st powerball winning numbers salt and pepper. In 6-inch soft tortillas, place a spoonful of your chicken mix, a spoonful of your cheese mix, and some shredded cheese, roll them up, and place them in a greased baking dish. Pour over enchilada sauce and sprinkle on shredded cheddar.

Allow to bake for about 30 minutes, until cheese is melted on top, and serve with Spanish rice.

8. Reuben Dip

Enjoy all the flavor of your favorite sandwich in this easy to make snack.

Preheat your oven to 350°F. Combine together a package of cream cheese (room temperature), ½ cup of mayonnaise, 2 tablespoons of ketchup, 1 tablespoon of horseradish, and 1 tablespoon of relish in a food processor, and blend until smooth.

Stir in 2 cups of grated Swiss cheese, 2 ounces of chopped corned beef, ½ cup of sauerkraut, and ¼ cup of chopped chives. Transfer to a baking dish, and allow to bake in the oven for about 15 minutes, until the dip is hot and bubbly.

Serve with pieces of toasted pumpernickel bread

Источник: https://livelyrun.com/from-the-farmer/15-health-benefits-cheese/

Mac is homemade mac and cheese bad for you Cheese Nutrition Facts

Love macaroni and cheese? You're not alone. It's a favorite in households across the country. But is this kid-friendly food nutritious?

Kraft Mac and Cheese calories are substantial. And other mac and cheese calories (even the homemade variety) are high as well. It is also high in fat and very high in sodium. But some brands are better than others. And there are ways to lower calories, fat, and sodium in macaroni and cheese to make it healthier.

Nutrition Facts

The following nutrition information is provided for 1 serving (180g) of prepared Kraft Macaroni and Cheese.

  • Calories: 257
  • Fat: 7.8g
  • Sodium: 518mg
  • Carbohydrates: 37.9g
  • Fiber: 2.3g
  • Sugars: 6.7g
  • Protein: 9g

Mac and Cheese Calories

Instructions on the Kraft box indicate that should add four tablespoons of butter or margarine and one-quarter cup of milk to blend your mac and cheese. A single serving as prepared provides 376 calories and 148 calories from fat. If you eat a whole box, the calories and fat will be much higher. To get your total number of calories in macaroni and cheese, add the following based on your preparation method.

Kraft Mac and Cheese Calories and Nutrition: Preparation Variations

  • If you make your mac and cheese with four tablespoons of butter and one-quarter cup of whole milk add 445 calories and 48 grams of fat and 30 grams of saturated fat
  • If you make your mac and cheese with four tablespoons of margarine and one-quarter cup of whole milk add 444 calories and 48 grams of fat and 10 grams of saturated fat
  • If you make your mac and cheese with four tablespoons of butter and one-quarter cup of 2 percent milk add 437 calories and 47 grams of fat and 30 grams of saturated fat
  • If you make your mac and cheese with four tablespoons of butter and one-quarter cup of skim milk add 428 calories and 46 grams of fat and 29 grams of saturated fat

Mac and Cheese Calories and Nutrition by Brand

What about other brands of macaroni and cheese? These are the calorie and nutrition facts for other popular brands according to USDA data.

  • A single serving of Stouffer's Macaroni and Cheese (one-fifth of the family size container) provides 350 calories, 17 grams of fat, 7 grams of saturated fat, 34 grams of carbohydrate, 15 grams of protein, 2 grams of fiber, 2 grams of sugar and 920 grams of sodium.
  • A single serving of Lean Cuisine Macaroni and Cheese provides 300 calories, 6 grams of fat, 48 grams of carbohydrate, 13 grams of protein, 2 grams of fiber, 5 grams of sugar and 560 milligrams of sodium.
  • A single serving of Amy's Organic Foods Macaroni and Cheese (frozen) provides 400 calories, 16 grams of fat, 10 grams of saturated fat, 16 grams of protein, 47 grams of carbohydrate, 3 grams of fiber, 6 grams of sugar and 640 milligrams of sodium.
  • A single serving of Velveeta Shells and Cheese provides 360 calories, 12 grams of fat, 3.5 grams of saturated fat, 49 grams of carbohydrate, 13 grams of protein, 2 grams of fiber, 4 grams of sugar and 870 milligrams of sodium. 

Homemade Mac and Cheese Nutrition

The calories and nutrition of homemade macaroni and cheese will vary based on your ingredients, but one cup of a typical homemade macaroni and cheese recipe would provide 506 calories, 20 grams of fat, 24 grams of saturated fat, 20 grams of protein, 53 grams horizon bank michigan city phone number carbohydrate, 3 grams of fiber, and 837 milligrams of sodium.

Micronutrients in Mac and Cheese

You'll benefit from several vitamins and minerals when you consume Kraft Mac and Cheese, such as thiamin, niacin, folic acid, and beta carotene. You'll also benefit from iron, calcium, and phosphorus.

Health Considerations 

Is any brand of macaroni discover cd rate history healthy? All of them are high in calories, sodium, and fat. And most of them provide artificial ingredients. Of all those listed, the Lean Cuisine Macaroni and Cheese will do the least damage to your waistline. That said, it is also possible to make your own mac and cheese using lighter ingredients. Another option is to replace the macaroni with fiber and nutrient-rich cauliflower or broccoli, which are also much lower in calories.

There are a few things you should consider before adding macaroni and cheese to your meal plan. This food is calorically-dense and is not likely to help you to maintain your weight or lose weight unless you really watch your portion size.

Most recipes and pre-packaged varieties use enriched pasta, not whole wheat pasta. So you're not getting a lot of dietary fiber when you consume the food. Fiber provides several health benefits and helps dieters curb hunger.

In addition, macaroni and cheese is very high in sodium. Even the kind you make at home provides almost half of the recommended daily intake of sodium. So when you add just a single serving of this food to your daily diet, you're likely to consume too much sodium for the day.

Lastly, macaroni and cheese is a food that we often overeat. The popular blue box is supposed to provide 2.5 servings. But many people eat the entire box as a meal. If you consume an entire box of Kraft Macaroni and Cheese (prepared with margarine and 2 percent milk), you'll consume 875 calories, 32.5 grams of fat, 11 grams of saturated fat and 25 grams of protein. You'll also consume over 1800 milligrams of sodium.

Common Questions

How long does macaroni stay fresh once prepared?

If refrigerated, your mac and cheese should stay fresh for 2-3 days. You can also freeze macaroni and cheese for up to about three months.

How long does packaged macaroni and cheese stay fresh in the box?

A typical packaged box of mac and cheese is good for about two years.

Recipes and Preparation Tips

Even though the homemade version of macaroni and cheese isn't the healthiest meal, you'll get the benefit of better nutrition if you make your own. Why? Because many of the manufactured brands use powdered cheese and other artificial ingredients that don't provide the benefits that real ingredients provide.

So how do you lighten up your favorite recipe? One way to adjust any macaroni and cheese recipe for better health is to use whole grain pasta. It won't lower the calorie count, but you'll get a dose of fiber that's good for your diet. And whether you make your own at home or buy the boxed variety, using skim or 2 percent milk will decrease both fat and calories. You can also try a different approach with this recipe for healthy slow cooker macaroni and cheese.

Allergies and Interventions

Since macaroni and cheese is made with a combination of several ingredients, there are several potential allergens present in the food. Those with dairy allergies, gluten insensitivity, celiac disease, or lactose intolerance should avoid this food.

But ingredients vary from brand to brand and recipe to recipe. Always check the ingredients list before consuming the food. If you suspect an allergy to any ingredient listed on the package or in the recipe, avoid the food until you get personalized advice from your healthcare provider

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including chinese restaurants in fort smith arkansas studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Applebee's, Kraft, Macaroni & Cheese, from kid's menu. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  2. Kraft Original Flavor Macaroni & Cheese Dinner 7.25 oz Box. Kraft.

  3. Macaroni and Cheese. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  4. Macaroni or noodles with cheese. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  5. How much sodium should I eat per day? American Heart Association. Reviewed May 23, 2018.

  6. Mäkelä M. Milk and wheat allergy, and celiac disease. Clin Transl Allergy. 2011;1(Suppl 1):S37. Published 2011 Aug 12. doi:10.1186/2045-7022-1-S1-S37

Источник: https://www.verywellfit.com/macaroni-and-cheese-nutrition-facts-calories-and-health-benefits-4111294

In my book, Annie’s is the gold standard for boxed mac and cheese. I usually opt for Greek yogurt to mix in with the cheese powder because I prefer a creamier, tangier taste, but, for the vegan option, I stuck with almond milk. After straining and stirring in Annie’s sauce, which has a dark apricot color, I cautiously nibbled on a small spoonful of shells. And then another, followed by an entire bowl’s worth. This stuff is truly good, especially if you like sweet potatoes. The sauce, which Annie’s actually abstains from calling "cheeze" or "cheese," is a pumpkin-sweet potato hybrid (unlike Daiya’s, which is made of arrowroot and cassava), which gives it a creamy taste that I could definitely see myself opting for over cheese on healthier nights. To Annie’s: If you could somehow turn this sauce into a shredded “cheese,” I’d put it on pizza, tacos, whatever. This was easily the best dairy-free offering I tried.

Noodle: 4 / 5 Cheese: 4.5 / 5

Buy Annie’s Vegan Shell Pasta and Creamy Sauce, $2.58

Источник: https://www.bonappetit.com/gallery/6-healthy-mac-and-cheese-brands

How Many Calories Are in Mac and Cheese?

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process.

Mac and cheese is a rich and creamy dish consisting of macaroni pasta mixed with a cheesy sauce. It’s particularly popular in the United States.

It’s typically high in calories because it’s made with pasta, cheese, cream, and butter, although the calorie content varies significantly between brands, ingredients, and serving size.

Traditional calorie-rich mac and cheese can be enjoyed in moderation, but there are many healthy swaps you can make to improve the nutrient content of the dish.

This article reviews the calorie content of different types of mac and cheese, suggests how to lower it, and provides a recipe for healthier mac and cheese.

Nutrition info for different types of mac and cheese

The calorie content of macaroni and cheese varies depending on the brand, ingredients, and serving size.

This table lists the nutrient content of a 1-cup (approximately 150–250-gram) serving of the most common mac and cheese brands, along with a homemade version (1, 2,6, ):

Mac and cheese contains large amounts of fat and refined carbs, both of which contribute to its high calorie count. Eating more calories than you burn, regardless of which foods they come from, can lead to weight gain.

Additionally, mac and cheese is high in sodium. It’s recommended that most people don’t exceed around 2,300 mg per day of this mineral, as excessive intake may cause high blood pressure in some individuals (8, )

Daiya “Cheezy Mac” — a dairy-free brand — has the lowest calorie count with only 300 calories per 1/3 package is homemade mac and cheese bad for you grams), which equates to about a 1-cup serving. It also contains the least sodium.

Meanwhile, homemade mac and cheese — both regular and gluten-free — has the highest calorie count, as this version is typically made with large amounts of cheese, milk, cream cheese, or butter. In return, you have the option to omit adding extra sodium.

As all of these options are relatively high in calories and sodium for 1 cup (about 150–250 grams) of food, you should only eat mac and cheese in moderation or as an occasional treat as part of a healthy diet.

Summary

Macaroni and cheese is typically high in calories, containing 300–500 calories per serving. It’s also high in sodium with 600–1,200 mg per serving.

How to reduce the calorie count of mac and cheese

Mac and cheese is typically made with rich, high calorie ingredients like pasta, cheese, and milk or cream. Some versions also include cream cheese or butter, which provide additional fat and calories.

These rich ingredients make mac and cheese a tasty dish to enjoy in moderation, but thankfully, there are easy swaps you can make to reduce the calorie content or make the dish healthier.

Here are a few healthier swaps for your macaroni and cheese:

  • Use high protein, high fiber pasta made from beans or chickpeas instead of plain macaroni to increase its protein and fiber contents.
  • Use cauliflower or broccoli florets instead of plain macaroni to reduce carbs and calories.
  • Follow the directions for “light preparation” on boxed mac and cheese products, as they require less butter and milk.
  • Add vegetables to your mac and cheese to increase the fiber and nutrient contents and decrease the calories per serving.
  • Halve the amount of cheese used and add herbs and spices to flavor the dish instead.
  • Swap cream and milk for unsweetened nut milk, which may reduce calories.
  • Use Neufchâtel cheese instead of cream cheese, which provides the same tangy flavor and creamy texture in fewer calories.
  • Add diced chicken breast or other lean protein sources, such as tuna or beans, to make the dish more filling and higher in protein.

Also, keep in mind that because mac and cheese is typically rich and calorie-laden, you should enjoy it in moderation and limit your serving size to no more than 1 cup (approximately 150–250 grams) per serving.

Summary

There are several ways to lower the calorie count of your mac and cheese, as well as make it healthier. Also, make sure to limit chase mortgage pay by phone to no more than 1 cup (150–250 grams) per serving.

A recipe for healthier mac and cheese

Here is a healthier recipe for traditional mac and cheese that still results in a rich, creamy side dish.

You will need:

  • 12 ounces (340 grams) of chickpea pasta elbows, dry
  • 1/8 cup (28 grams) of butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon (2 grams) of xanthan gum
  • 1 1/2 cup (360 ml) of unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 1/2 cup (360 ml) of chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1/2 teaspoon of salt
  • 1 cup (125 grams) of shredded cheddar cheese

The steps are:

  1. Prepare the chickpea macaroni according to the package instructions and set aside.
  2. In a large pot, melt the butter until it’s slightly bubbly. Add the xanthan gum and mix it with the butter well.
  3. Mix in the unsweetened almond milk, broth, and salt and simmer for 5–6 minutes, stirring regularly, until the sauce has thickened slightly.
  4. Stir in the shredded cheese until it melts.
  5. Add the cooked pasta and mix it checking account options at wells fargo to evenly distribute the sauce.

This recipe makes approximately six 1-cup servings. One serving contains:

  • Calories: 314
  • Fat: 14 grams
  • Protein: 19 grams
  • Carbs: 34 grams
  • Fiber: 8 grams
  • Sodium: 583 mg

Chickpea pasta contains more protein and fiber than regular macaroni, and swapping white milk for unsweetened almond milk cuts some fat and calories.

Instead of using refined white flour as a thickening agent, this cheese sauce employs a small amount of xanthan gum, a powerful thickener that can be bought online or at natural grocers.

Additionally, this recipe is gluten-free and can easily be made vegetarian- or vegan-friendly by replacing the butter with olive oil and the cheese with a non-dairy cheese substitute. For a low carb alternative, replace the pasta with broccoli or cauliflower florets.

You can keep the leftovers for up to 5 days in your refrigerator. Feel free to take any of the suggestions listed above to make this mac and cheese even lower in calories or richer in nutrients.

Summary

The above mac and cheese recipe includes some healthier swaps that make it lower in calories and higher in protein and fiber than traditional mac and cheese.

The bottom line

Mac and cheese is typically rich, creamy, and high in calories. However, the calorie and nutrient content depends on the brand, ingredients, and serving size.

The dish can be enjoyed in moderation as part of a healthy diet, but there are also several ways to reduce the calorie content and improve the nutrient content.

By following this recipe or making some of the swaps listed above, you can enjoy a healthier mac and cheese that is still decadent and delicious.

Источник: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/mac-and-cheese-calories
is homemade mac and cheese bad for you

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