Skip to content

Archives

1st grade reading sight words


1st grade reading sight words

Write 2 matching cards for each of the sight words. Turn all the cards facing down on the table. Take turns flipping over two cards. Students. List of 100 1st Grade Sight Words (or 1st Grade Spelling Words). A, about, again, air, all, along, also, another, answer, any, are, around, away. Wear a sight word crown. Paper crown headbands printed with rightwards. Wear your word proudly and practice reading others' words. Fun in person.

1st grade reading sight words -

Fry Word List - 1,000 High Frequency Words

The Fry word list or "instant words" are widely accepted to contain the most used words in reading and writing. The sight words list is divided into ten levels and then divided into groups of twenty-five words, based on frequency of use and difficulty.

It is important for young readers to instantly recognize these high frequency words by sight in order to build up their reading fluency. It is also important for readers to practice words in meaningful context through phrase and sentence reading practice. As a follow up activity, students can practice writing short sentences including Fry words.

As you individually meet with the student, you’ll quickly be able to identify words that they are having trouble with. Also, as students write in their journals and read aloud, regular misspellings and misuse can provide you with a target list of words to teach first or spend more time on. Don't forget to check out all of our vocabulary worksheets and Dolch Sight Words.

Fry Words – Complete list of 1,000 Words

Fry Words – Complete list of 1,000 Words

This includes all 1,000 Fry Words from the 1st – 10th levels.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, 4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade

Fry Words – The 1st Hundred

Fry Words – The 1st Hundred

Here’s the first level of the 1,000 Fry words.

Grade Levels:
Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade
CCSS Code(s):
RF.K.3.C, RF.1.3.G

Fry Words – The 3rd Hundred

Fry Words – The 3rd Hundred

This page is the list of the third one hundred words on the Fry list.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.3.3.D

Fry Words – The 2nd Hundred

Fry Words – The 2nd Hundred

This is the second one hundred Fry words.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.2.3.F

Fry Words – The 9th Hundred

Fry Words  – The 9th Hundred

The ninth one hundred words from the Fry list can be found here.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 4th Hundred

Fry Words – The 4th Hundred

The Fry “instant word” list has these as the fourth one hundred words.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 10th Hundred

Fry Words – The 10th Hundred

This is the final level of the Fry 1,000 word list, featuring the tenth one hundred words.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 5th Hundred

Fry Words – The 5th Hundred

Here’s the fifth one hundred of the 1,000 Fry words.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 6th Hundred

Fry Words – The 6th Hundred

This is the 6th level of one hundred words from the Fry word list.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 7th Hundred

Fry Words – The 7th Hundred

Here’s the seventh one hundred words on the Fry “instant words” list.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 8th Hundred

Fry Words – The 8th Hundred

This page has the eighth one hundred words from the Fry 1,000 word list.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A
Источник: https://www.k12reader.com/subject/vocabulary/fry-words/

Why?

The most important aspect of teaching sight words is teaching kids WHY they must memorize these whole words.Sight words have an important job because without them a lot of books and writing would not make sense. We’re learning them so we can enjoy a good story! As much as possible, point out sight words when you see them so your child cansee their role in stories.

Start easy

Focus on only one or two words for a week. Anymore than this before your child is ready will overwhelm and frustrate them. Remind them that a lot of times sight words don’t follow the spelling and sound rules, they can be tricky!

Paper Color Words

Once you’ve chosen a few words, write them clearly, in large, thick lowercase letters on a piece of paper or notecard. Write only one word per piece of paper or notecard. Have your child color the paper to give it a blue background or use color paper. Using any color will help the word stand out visually and in your child’s memory. You can use these cards like flash cards and review the words each day.

Word Boxing

Another technique to help student remember words it to “box” the letters. After you have written a sight word on a piece of paper, carefully draw a box around each letter. These boxes will help children visualize the words in their mind so they can retain them.

CLICK TO VIEW EXAMPLE OF WORD BOXING

Trace It and Tap It!

Try this quick 2 minute technique to help your child remember any sight word they have!

  1. Write a sight word on a note card or flash card in clear lowercase letter handwriting. Tell your child what the word is, then have them repeat it back to you.
  2. Have your child trace each letter on the flashcard using the back of a pen or pencil, say the name of each letter as they trace it. Then say the whole word while underlining it. Do this 2 more times.
  3. Now, trace the word on the table using their finger. Say each letter as you trace it then say the whole word while underlining it. Do this 2 times. Have them try to trace it from memory on their last try.
  4. Next, using the hand they write with, tap each letter of the word down their opposite arm. For example: how, “h” tap the shoulder, “o” tap the elbow, and “w” tap the wrist.
  5. Finally, have your child write the word in a notebook.
  6. Your child has mastered this new word when they can show you that they can read the word at least 5 times on their own, while its in the context of a book.

Add a Picture!

For many kids, it’s easier to visualize a picture with a word. If you’re writing sight words on note cards or pieces of paper, add a small picture or detail that might help them remember it. For example, for the word “my”, you could draw a small girl hugging the letter “y” to show her saying “my!” For the word “it”, you could draw a small creature that looks like a thing or an “it”. For the word “in”, you could draw the word “in” inside of a bubble.

Act it Out

All children benefit from acting out words. Bring a new word to life by creating a movement or gesture to help them build an association to the word. For example, for the word “my”, kids can wrap their arms around themselves and say “my” while looking at the word. For “you” they can point both their hands at you while repeating the word “you” they read from the card.

Tell Me a Sentence

Sight words are meaningless until we know how to use these words in our own conversations. Have your child tell you an original sentence using their new word. This can be challenging, so be ready to slow down with your child as they try to use their new word in a sentence and give lots of high fives when they can use it correctly.

Sight word: live

“We live in North Carolina, but my grandma lives in Georgia.”

Make Wormy Words

Using brightly colored yarn, cut out short (about 3 inches), medium (about 6 inches) and long (about 10 inches) pieces. Lay a blanket or bath  towel flat on the floor. Have your child form the sight words they are learning on the cloth using the pieces of yarn. This approach helps commit the word to their long-term memory.

Sight Word Ninja

Tell your child that sight words appear silently in the world around us. Every time your child spots a sight word out in the world of words, such as on coupon, in a story, or on a piece of mail, they should point it out and celebrate! The purpose of this activity is for students to get excited about recognizing words and to get a boost of confidence from knowing how to read them.

Источник: https://www.homereadinghelper.org/1st-grade-reading-skills-sight-words/

The Way I Learned to Teach High Frequency Words Was Wrong (And What I Now Do Instead)

My first experience with teaching high frequency words was filled with confusion.

At that time, I was working as a reading tutor while also getting my undergraduate degree to become a certified teacher.

As part of the reading tutoring program, I was supposed to introduce a few high frequency words on flash cards to a Kindergarten student. When possible, we were supposed to connect the high frequency words (aka sight words) to the books that we were reading with the child.

And I was confused.

I remember thinking, “Wait…you just put the word on a card and he’s going to learn it? Just plain old memorization?”

It didn’t feel right to me. It felt boring. And not only that – it felt like it didn’t reflect the way young children learn. Weren’t they supposed to be moving around? Doing hands-on activities?

Moreover, I didn’t even really understand what a “sight word” was. I thought that all sight words were spelled irregularly – and that memorization was the only way to learn them.

Well. It turns out I was wrong!

In this blog post, I’ll share what I’ve learned since then. I’ll also share tips for how to teach sight words / high frequency words so that they really STICK! (And so that it’s actually fun, too.) 🙂

Do you know the best ways to teach high frequency words? This blog post.

What are high frequency words?

First of all, let’s clarify the terms “high frequency words” and “sight words.” Here’s my current understanding of the terms:

High frequency words –

  • Words that appear frequently in texts (especially beginning books for children)
  • Can be regularly spelled (no surprises – like the words “can” or “like”)
  • Can also be irregularly spelled / have surprising or tricky sounds (like the words “four” or “does”)

Sight words –

  • Words that a reader knows instantly, by sight

I used to say “sight words,” but now I mostly use the term “high frequency words.”

I like this term because even though it’s a little wordier, it better represents what I’m truly trying to teach. (I’m trying to teach my students words that appear frequently in text, so that they eventually become sight words for the students.)

How do readers learn high frequency words?

Memorization certainly plays a role in learning high frequency words. But there’s more to it than that!

When someone is learning a new word, the learning process works best when these 3 areas of the brain are activated:

  1. The part where meaning is stored
  2. The part where spelling is stored
  3. The part where sounds are stored

Do the first two resonate with you? You probably have students practice reading high frequency words in sentences or even making up their own sentences with the words. And you might have students learn to spell the words.

But what about #3? Did you know that it IS valuable to help students think about the sounds in a high frequency word?

If #3 has you saying, “Whoa!” or “Really??” – then I can relate! I was surprised by that, too.

Brain Area #1: Meaning

When students are learning a high frequency word, they need to understand what it means. They need to hear it in the context of a sentence. They should also come up with their own example sentences (orally and/or in writing).

Students should have multiple opportunities to hear and use the high frequency word, preferably soon after the word is introduced.

Brain Area #2: Spelling

Just learning to read a high frequency word isn’t enough – we want the kids to learn to spell them, too!

Multi-sensory activities are great for spelling practice. (A multi-sensory activity incorporates more than one of the five senses.)

In the last section of this post, you’ll see some ideas for multi-sensory spelling practice activities.

Brain Area #3: Sounds

Students need to connect the letters in the word to the sounds that the letters make.

This is easier for words with regular spellings – like “much.” After students have been taught vocabulary words like “short vowel” and “digraph,” use these words when discussing the word. I might say to a student, “Much” is spelled M-U-C-H. What’s the vowel in this word?” (u) “What does the u say?” (/ŭ/) “There’s also a digraph in this word. The C and H work together to say /ch/. /m/ /ŭ/ /ch/. Much.”

What you say and ask about a word will depend upon how much students have learned. If a student doesn’t know what a vowel is, I’m not going to ask her to identify the vowel!

But my point is this: Connect the concepts that you’re teaching in phonics and phonological awareness to the high frequency words that you’re teaching. As much as possible, I match our high frequency words to the phonics patterns we’re studying that week.

Students need to connect the sounds in a word to the letters in the word. This is sometimes called orthographic mapping,and you can learn more about it in this video:

How should I teach high frequency words?

Like anything in education, there’s no one “right way” to do this. But I’ll share how we do it in my phonics program, From Sounds to Spelling.

This routine incorporates multi-sensory strategies and seeks to activate all 3 parts of the brain:

STEP 1: Present a written sentence to students that includes the target word. (If possible, I make the sentence personally meaningful to students by using their names or writing about something in our classroom. I also try to include words in the sentence that students would be able to decode.) Here’s an example from the Kindergarten program:

This is a high frequency word / sight word sentence that I use with my Kindergarten students. After we're done reading it, they can mix up the words and practice putting the sentence back in order!

You can certainly just write a sentence on the board, too! I only use the word cards with my Kindergarteners because they’re developing their understanding of the concept of a word.

Also, as an independent activity, I can mix up the words, place them in a plastic baggie, and have students put them back in order.

STEP 2: Have students come up with their own original sentences – orally. (After you model an example, they might turn and tell their sentence to a partner.)

STEP 3: Discuss the sounds in the word. Regardless of whether the word is regularly or irregularly spelled, we connect the sounds of the words to the letters.

I often use sound boxes as I do this.

Elkonin boxes or sound boxes can be used with high frequency words / sight words, too! They help students understand which letters work together to make one sound.

In this example, I might cover up the word and say, “Listen to this word. Does. What sounds do you hear?” Students should tell me /d/ /ŭ/ /z/. Then, I’d uncover the word and say the sounds, pointing to each letter or group of letters as I go: /d/ (point to the d) “/ŭ/” (point to the oe) “/z/” (point to the s)

What I say next would depend on what students have already learned. But I would probably ask, “Are there any surprising/tricky sounds?” Students should notice that the /ŭ/ sound for oe is surprising/tricky. I would point out that both vowels are in one box because they work together to make one sound (/ŭ/). Students should also notice that the /z/ sound for s is surprising. (However, they may already know that s can sometimes say /z/.)

Last, I might have them say the sounds while I point under the corresponding box.

This discussion happens pretty quickly. At first, it takes longer to go through this process. But as time goes on, students learn the routine and can do most of the work with connecting the sounds to letters.

STEP 4: “Tap out” the word. To make the spelling more memorable, students tap out the word on their arm while spelling it aloud. (This is a multi-sensory strategy.)

Here’s a quick informal video to show you how we do this:

STEP 5: Write the word. I like to make this part multi-sensory, too.

In this step, students are writing the word AND creating a “bumpy word” that they can trace with their finger.

There are different ways to do this, but I like to have students place a piece of paper on top of a knitting screen (like this one – Amazon affiliate link). They use a crayon to write the words. You can have them spell the word aloud as they write.

Looking for a simple multi-sensory activity for sight words? In this activity, we write on top of a knitting screen, using a crayon! Students need to go over the word several times. Then, they can trace it with their finger while spelling it aloud.

Then, once students have written it (have them go over the word 3 times), they can use a finger to trace over the word and spell it out loud. When they practice the word in the future, they can take out this sheet and trace the “bumpy word” while spelling the word aloud.

STEP 6: As long as time permits, have students write an original sentence with the word and read their sentence aloud to a partner. We usually skip this step at the Kindergarten level. (Also, if you find that you’re frequently running out of time for this step, you might skip Step 2 so you have more time for this.)

Those six steps are how I introduce a new high frequency word!

In addition to this process, in my program, 2nd graders also keep a personal dictionary / word book that they add words to. (1st graders and Kindergarteners could also do this if you like.) This is a great tool for them to use as they’re writing.

All of this sounds like a lot, right? At first, it is! But once students learn the routine, things move more quickly.

Where can I get materials for teaching high frequency words?

Right now, my phonics program is the only resource I have that covers high frequency words extensively.

Each week of the program, students work on words that have a certain sound or spelling pattern – and they also learn a few high frequency words (that may or may not follow the pattern).

The high frequency words in the program don’t match any one specific list (i.e. Dolch or Fry). They were derived from a few different resources and designed specifically to equip students with words that will be useful to them in their reading and writing.

I hope that this post was helpful to you! Did anything surprise you? How does this compare with how you learned to teach high frequency words? I’d love to hear from you in the comments!

Last but not least, if you’d like a FREE scope and sequence for teaching phonics in K-2, grab mine here.

Happy teaching!

References

Blevins, W. (2017). A Fresh Look at Phonics, Grades K-2. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Miles, K. P., Rubin, G. B., & Gonzalez-Frey, S. (2018, May). Rethinking Sight Words. The Reading Teacher, 71(6), 715-726.

Do you know the best ways to teach high frequency words? This blog post.
Источник: https://learningattheprimarypond.com/blog/how-to-teach-sight-words/

Reading is a complex skill that requires lots of little processes coming together to make sense from a bunch of symbols on the page. And as your child begins to master age-appropriate books in first grade, they'll be using a lot of different strategies to read.

Much of the work of reading is spent decoding words by segmenting into sounds then blending them together to make words. For instance, the way the word "cat" can be separated into the sounds c, a, and t, and sounded out to make the word "cat." However, some words cannot be easily sounded out, and since they often appear in text, it helps for kids to be able to recognize them with just one look. Enter the concept of sight words.

Sight words need to be recognized at a glance, and parents can help kids to learn these important words in a number of ways. Here's what they're all about, plus ways you can help your first grader master them.

Dolch Words

The most common sight words are available in lists compiled by educational experts more than 70 years ago. Dr. Edward Dolch produced his word list for kids aged PreK through to Grade 3. His list is still used in schools today and includes over 200 words.

Fry Words

Dr. Edward Fry expanded on these word lists for grades 1-10 developing a bank of the 1,000 most commonly used words. Dolch words are the ones your child will encounter first as they learn to read and include words like: and, away, big, blue, can, come, down, find, for, funny, go, help, here. Fry words are the expanded bank of keywords that children learn as they go into the third grade and beyond, they include: almost, along, always, began, between.

You can find Dolch word lists here and Fry word lists here.

Grade 1 Sight Words List

Dolch's list of first grade sight words includes 41 words building on those learned in Kindergarten. Here they are:

  • After

  • Again

  • An

  • Any

  • As

  • Ask

  • By

  • Could

  • Every

  • Fly

  • From

  • Give

  • Going

  • Had

  • Has

  • Her

  • Him

  • His

  • How

  • Just

  • Know

  • Let

  • Live

  • May

  • Of

  • Old

  • Once

  • Open

  • Over

  • Put

  • Round

  • Some

  • Stop

  • Take

  • Thank

  • Them

  • Then

  • Think

  • Walk

  • Were

  • When

How to Practice Sight Words at Home

Learning sight words is an important part of developing early reading skills, but it can seem a little dull to children. Incorporate these games and fun activities as well as simply enjoying books together to help keep things interesting. With this practice, your child will soon be reading the goodnight story to you!

Write 5-7 sight words on sticky notes and put them up around the house

Quiz your child on these words throughout the day. You can also keep kids active at the same time by asking them to jog/skip/jump when they get to particular words. Feel free to swap the words over as your child masters them, but be sure to circle back and consolidate their knowledge.

Play the question game

Kids love to answer questions, so write these two sight words on their own cards: "when" and "how." Then let your child ask you questions so long as they can select and read aloud the right question word.

Play Go Fish

Start with ten sight words at a time and write them out twice on cards to make a pair. Play Go Fish by turning one card over at a time and trying to match the sight word. Make sure your child reads the word aloud as well as matching them by sight.

Make flashcards

Create flashcards and test your child on them. Make it a game by using a timer and moving on to a new card if your child gets frustrated. Repeat the same set of words to give your child confidence through achievement before moving on o a new set.

Источник: https://www.yahoo.com/now/40-first-grade-sight-words-204318159.html

Sight Words for Kids: Kindergarten and Beyond!

Readiness

Cheryl Lundy Swift's picture
Cheryl Lundy SwiftSeptember 17, 20200
learning sight words for kindergarten

No matter whether kindergarten children will be learning in person, online, or a hybrid of the two, parents and teachers are still focused on ensuring their emerging readers develop a love for reading while learning to read effectively and efficiently. One critical skill that children need in order to build solid foundational reading skills is sight word recognition.

What Are Sight Words?

When we teach children to read, we are basically helping them to crack a code. Children learn to hear and say the sounds of the alphabet and then how to blend those sounds to make words. These sounds usually follow basic spelling rules or phonetic principles, but there are some words that did not follow rules. These words are called sight words.

Most sight words cannot be decoded or sounded out, and they are also difficult to represent with a picture. As a result, children must learn to recognize these words automatically, or at first sight. Children who are able to quickly and instantly recognize sight words are more likely to become more fluent readers who read at a good speed because they are not stopping to try to decode every word. When children recognize sight words within three seconds, they are also more likely to comprehend what they are reading. Children who are able to instantly recognize sight words are more likely to be confident readers because over 50-70 percent of the general English text is made up of sight words.

There are several sight word lists for emerging readers. One list is called the Dolch Word List, created by E.W. Dolch in 1936. The list contains 220 of the most commonly used words that should be recognized by first sight. The list is divided by grade level from Pre-K through third grade, but many educators believe that these words should be mastered by first grade. In addition to the 220 sight words, the Dolch Word List also includes 95 high-frequency nouns. In the 1950’s, Dr. Edward Fry expanded the Dolch Word List to include 1,000 commonly used words in the English language. Fry updated the Fry Sight Word List in 1980, which is comprised of the most commonly used words in books, newspapers, and other publications. Like the Dolch Word list, the Fry Sight Word List is made up of both sight words and high-frequency words and is divided by grade level. Teachers will generally pull from one or both of these lists to create the sight words that children should learn. It is important for parents to keep in mind that children are expected to be able to instantly recognize sight words they have learned previously.

Examples of Sight Words for Kids

Here is a list of sight words and high-frequency words for Pre-K, kindergarten, and first grade that have been taken from both the Dolch Word and Fry Sight Word Lists.

Grade

Sight Words

Pre-K

(40 words)

a, and, away, big, blue, can, come, down, find, for, funny, go, help, here, I, in, is, it, jump, little, look, make, me, my, not, one, play, red, run, said, see, the, three, to, two, up, we, where, yellow, you

Kindergarten

(100 words)

about, all, am, an, are, as, at, ate, be, been, black, brown, but, by,  call, came, could, day, did, do, each, eat, first, four, from, get, good, had, has, have, he, her, him, his, how, if, into, like, long, made, many, may, more, must, new, no, now, number, of, oil, on, or, other, our, out, part, people, please, pretty, ran, ride, saw, say, she, sit, so, some, soon, than, that, their, them, then, there, these, they, this, time, to, under, use, want, was, water, way, well, went, were, what, when, which, white, who, will, with, word, would, write, yes, your

1st Grade

(100 words)

add, after, again, air, also, America, animal, another, answer, any, around, ask, back, because, before, boy, change, different, does, end, even, every, fly, follow, food, form, found, give, going, great, hand, high, home, house, just, kind, know, land, large, learn, let, letter, line, live, man, mean, men, most, mother, move, much, must, name, need, near, off, old, only, once, open, over, page, picture, place, point, put, read, right, round, same, say, sentence, set, should, show, small, sound, spell, still, stop, study, such, take, tell, thank, things, think, through, too, try, turn, us, very, walk, want, well, why, work, world, year

Site Words FAQs

Q: What is the difference between sight words and high-frequency words?

A: While both sight words and high-frequency words are important, they are not the same. Sight words are words that cannot be decoded, so knowing spelling rules or phonics will not help a child sound out the word. High-frequency words are commonly used words that students need to know. Some high-frequency words are decodable using spelling and phonics rules, and some are not. As a result, it is important to help students recognize both sight word and high-frequency words by sight, so that they can recognize them automatically. As you begin to introduce spelling rules, phonics and syllabication to Kindergarten children, be sure to highlight high-frequency words they have memorized that fit a given rule. Regardless of whether the word is a sight word or high-frequency words, they both must be taught explicitly and systemically so that children will know them automatically.

Q: When should sight words be taught?

A: While most Pre-K children are able to master some sight words, it is important to remember that children learn language skills at different rates. They also have different interest levels when it comes to learning words. Some children are eager and ready to learn while others may not be. As a result, there is no specific age to begin teaching sight words. So try some fun sight word activities with your two- or three-year old children, but do not push if they are not interested. Let your child’s developmental readiness and interest level guide you.

Q: How many sight words should kindergarteners learn?

A: There are varying opinions as to how many words children should learn. Some literacy experts like Tim Shanahan believe that kindergarteners should master 20 sight words by the end of kindergarten. The Dolch word list has 40 words listed for Pre-K students and some school districts require that kindergarteners learn 100 sight words by the end of the school year. Consider your children’s progress and interest levels as well as your school district’s expectation to help decide on the appropriate number of sight words for your children.  

Q: What order should I teach sight words?

A: There is no one set prescribed order to teach sight words. Some teachers and parents teach the sight words from the Dolch or Fry lists in alphabetical order. Others use the lists and create their own order. Consider using the Frequency Fry List that has words ranked by the frequency of use for reading and writing. To help children learn sight words and get them to stick, create your own lists to teach students the words not only in isolation, but also in context. For example, if you decide to read a specific book, teach the sight words from the book you are reading. This gives children practice reading the word in isolation and also helps them to see how the word is used in language.

Q: How many sight words can be taught in a day? 

A: Before determining a set number of sight words to teach, it is important to focus on the number of words that children are actually learning. It is important to consider the quality of their learning, not the quantity. Make certain that children can recognize sight words instantly and accurately before rushing to complete a certain number of words. Before starting, be sure to consider the child’s age, motivation and memory skills. Keep in mind that a child who can instantly and accurately name 50 sight words is building a more solid reading foundation versus a child who “kind of knows” 100 words. 

Start by introducing children to three to five new words during a given lesson. During the next day’s lesson, review the previously introduced words. If children remember all of the words, consider introducing three to five new words. If children do not remember the previous words, review the previously introduced words and wait to introduce new words. Also, consider reducing the number of words you introduce in each lesson to one or two words if children are struggling or feel overwhelmed.

Learning Without Tears Knows Sight Words!

There are lots of fun, engaging strategies to teach children sight words. Before you begin teaching sight words, make certain you have broken down the word lists into manageable and differentiated lists for your students. Secondly, no matter whether you are teaching your children in person or virtually, it is important to devote at least 15-20 minutes a day to teaching sight words. Lastly, make learning sight words is a fun and interactive activity. Below are 10 engaging sight words activities to do with your children.

Sight Word Concentration – On index cards, write the same sight words on two separate cards. Make two piles – one with the word and the other with the matching word. Mix the two piles and place them face down. Have children take turns to find the matching cards. Consider having children write down the words that they found. Use Learning Without Tears’ A+ Worksheet Maker to create worksheets where they can copy the words.

Build-A-Sight Word – Children love building words with manipulatives like magnetic alphabet letters. Learning Without Tears’ Magnetic Lowercase & Blackboard Set contains magnetic lowercase letters and a magnetic blackboard with double lines so that children can build and write sight words. Children can also build sight words using  Learning Without Tears’ free Make Your Own Letter Cards.  

Sight Word Bingo – Create individual bingo cards using sight words that you have introduced. You can also give students a blank board and have them write the words in the boxes from a list you provide. Be sure to have the words written on index cards and pull them out of a container to call the sight words. Students should place a marker on the word when it is called. Students must yell "Sight Word Bingo!" when they have covered a vertical, horizontal, or diagonal row.

Stamp Out Sight Words – Using alphabet cookie cutters, have students stamp out letters using dough, then have children build sight words. Model for students first, then have them do it with you. After guiding them, have them try to build it independently. This fun activity is also great for building fine motor skills.

Sentences with Sight Words – Learning Without Tears’ Sentence School is a great way to help students learn sight words and write sentences. Students will love the engaging, hands-on lessons, and the guide is a great resource for teachers and parents alike.

Sight Word Detective – Show children a sight word with a missing letter. Have children act as detectives to find the missing letter. You can play as a whole class, in teams, or individually. To make it more challenging, remove more than one letter. Also consider using the word with the missing letter in a sentence to help children practice context clues. You can write letters on a white board or use magnetic letters.

Sight Word Scramble – Using magnetic letters or letter cards, mix up the letters of the sight word and have children unscramble the words to reveal the correct spelling of the sight word. You can involve more children by giving each child a letter and have them spell out a sight word.

Sight Word Sing-a-Long – Music is a great teaching tool for children and adults. Learning Without Tears has lots of fun, engaging, and catchy songs to help students learn sight words. Consider displaying the lyrics from Learning Without Tears’ Rock, Rap, and Learn CD on a white board and have children circle all of the sight words. Lyrics to all songs are located on Learning Without Tears’ Handwriting Interactive Teaching Tool.

Read and Write Engaging Stories – Children feel more confident and excited when they begin to recognize words in a book. When reading to children, help them to identify sight words. Learning Without Tears’ MatMan Book series contains lots of sight words. Give sight word readers to children to begin reading on their own. After reading a story, write the sight words that they see and have children copy them. Also, encourage your students to create a funny story by writing down a sentence from each child. Circle all of the sight words they use.

Hand Activity Sight Words – To help children recognize sight words automatically and make them stick, teach them the attributes of the words using Learning Without Tears’ Hand Activity Method. Some lowercase letters are tall (b,f,h), some are small (a, e, n), and some are descending (j, p, y). Have them use their hands to spell out the words or use the hands and letters from LWT’s Magnetic Lowercase & Blackboard Set to help them visualize the words. Also, consider highlighting other attributes of words—like the number of letters, consonants, and vowels—in order to help students connect with sight words.

Explicitly teaching children sight words in a fun, engaging manner will help to build their reading rate, fluency, and confidence. Sight words will build a solid foundation for students to become proficient readers. Have fun!

Cheryl Lundy Swift's picture

By Cheryl Lundy Swift Cheryl is an award-winning educational leader, curriculum developer, motivational speaker and trainer. She is a graduate of the University of Virginia and received a Master of Education in Administration & Supervision from Virginia Commonwealth University. She is the founder and CEO of EduPower and served as the Lead Curriculum Developer for Learning Without Tears’ Get Set for School’s Language and Literacy curriculum, which received an AEP Distinguished Achievement award. Cheryl is currently pursuing her doctorate in Educational Leadership from Kean University in Union, NJ.

Источник: https://www.lwtears.com/blog/sight-words-for-kindergarten
1st grade reading sight words

Related Videos

Reading Practice for Kindergarten and First Grade 1

The Way I Learned to Teach High Frequency Words Was Wrong (And What I Now Do Instead)

My first experience with teaching high frequency words was filled with confusion.

At that time, I was working as a reading tutor while also getting my undergraduate degree to become a certified teacher.

As part of the reading tutoring program, I was supposed to introduce a few high frequency words on flash cards to a Kindergarten student. When possible, we were supposed to connect the high frequency words (aka sight words) to the books that we were reading with the child.

And I was confused.

I remember thinking, “Wait…you just put the word on a card and he’s going to learn it? Just plain old memorization?”

It didn’t feel right to me. It felt boring. And not only that – it felt like it didn’t reflect the way young children learn. Weren’t they supposed to be moving around? Doing hands-on activities?

Moreover, I didn’t even really understand what a “sight word” was. I thought that all sight words were spelled irregularly – and that memorization was the only way to learn them.

Well. It turns out I was wrong!

In this blog post, I’ll share what I’ve learned since then. I’ll also share tips for how to teach sight words / high frequency words so that they really STICK! (And so that it’s actually fun, too.) 🙂

Do you know the best ways to teach high frequency words? This blog post.

What are high frequency words?

First of all, let’s clarify the terms “high frequency words” and “sight words.” Here’s my current understanding of the terms:

High frequency words –

  • Words that appear frequently in texts (especially beginning books for children)
  • Can be regularly spelled (no surprises – like the words “can” or “like”)
  • Can also be irregularly spelled / have surprising or tricky sounds (like the words “four” or “does”)

Sight words –

  • Words that a reader knows instantly, by sight

I used to say “sight words,” but now I mostly use the term “high frequency words.”

I like this term because even though it’s a little wordier, it better represents what I’m truly trying to teach. (I’m trying to teach my students words that appear frequently in text, so that they eventually become sight words for the students.)

How do readers learn high frequency words?

Memorization certainly plays a role in learning high frequency words. But there’s more to it than that!

When someone is learning a new word, the learning process works best when these 3 areas of the brain are activated:

  1. The part where meaning is stored
  2. The part where spelling is stored
  3. The part where sounds are stored

Do the first two resonate with you? You probably have students practice reading high frequency words in sentences or even making up their own sentences with the words. And you might have students learn to spell the words.

But what about #3? Did you know that it IS valuable to help students think about the sounds in a high frequency word?

If #3 has you saying, “Whoa!” or “Really??” – then I can relate! I was surprised by that, too.

Brain Area #1: Meaning

When 1st grade reading sight words are learning a high frequency word, they need to understand what it means. They need to hear it in the context of a sentence. They should also come up with their own example sentences (orally and/or in writing).

Students should have multiple opportunities to hear and use the high frequency word, preferably soon after the word is introduced.

Brain Area #2: Spelling

Just learning to read a high frequency word isn’t enough – we want the kids to learn to spell them, too!

Multi-sensory activities are great for spelling practice. (A multi-sensory activity incorporates more than one of the five senses.)

In the last section of this post, you’ll see some ideas for multi-sensory spelling practice activities.

Brain Area #3: Sounds

Students need to connect the letters in the word to the sounds that the letters make.

This is easier for words with regular spellings – like “much.” After students have been taught vocabulary words like “short vowel” and “digraph,” use these words when discussing the word. I 1st grade reading sight words say to a student, “Much” is spelled M-U-C-H. What’s the vowel in this word?” (u) “What does the u say?” (/ŭ/) “There’s also a digraph in this word. The C and H work together to say /ch/. /m/ /ŭ/ /ch/. Much.”

What you say and ask about a word will depend upon how much students have learned. If a student doesn’t know what a vowel is, I’m not going to ask her to identify the vowel! tri counties online banking sign in my point is this: Connect the concepts that you’re teaching in phonics and phonological awareness to the high frequency words that you’re teaching. As much as possible, I match our high frequency words to the phonics patterns we’re studying that week.

Students need to connect the sounds in a word to the letters in the word. This is sometimes called orthographic mapping,and you can learn more about it in this video:

How should I teach high frequency words?

Like anything in education, there’s no one “right way” to do this. But I’ll share how we do it in my phonics program, From Sounds to Spelling.

This routine incorporates multi-sensory strategies and seeks to activate all 3 parts of 1st grade reading sight words brain:

STEP 1: Present a written sentence to students that includes the target word. (If possible, I make the sentence personally meaningful to students by using their names or writing about something in our classroom. I also try to include words in the sentence that students would be able to decode.) Here’s an example from the Kindergarten program:

This is a high frequency word / sight word sentence that I use with my Kindergarten students. After we're done reading it, they can mix up the words and practice putting the sentence back in order!

You can certainly just write a sentence on the board, too! I only use the word cards with my Kindergarteners because they’re developing their understanding of the concept of a word.

Also, as an independent activity, I can mix up the words, place them in a plastic baggie, and have students put them back in order.

STEP 2: Have students come up with their own original sentences – orally. (After you model an example, they might turn and tell their sentence to a partner.)

STEP 3: Discuss the sounds in the word. Regardless of whether the word is regularly or irregularly spelled, we connect the sounds of the words to the letters.

I often use sound boxes as I do this.

Elkonin boxes or sound boxes can be used with high frequency words / sight words, too! They help students understand which letters work together to make one sound.

In this example, I might cover up the word and say, “Listen to this word. Does. What sounds do you hear?” Students should tell me /d/ /ŭ/ /z/. Then, I’d uncover the word and say the sounds, pointing to each letter or group of letters as I go: /d/ (point to the d) “/ŭ/” (point to the oe) “/z/” (point state bank of india near me branch the s)

What I say next would depend on what students have already learned. But I would probably ask, “Are there any surprising/tricky sounds?” Students should notice that the /ŭ/ sound for oe is surprising/tricky. I would point out that both vowels are in one box because they work together to make one sound (/ŭ/). Students should also notice that the /z/ sound for s is surprising. (However, they may already know that s can sometimes say /z/.)

Last, I might have them say the sounds while I point under the corresponding box.

This discussion happens pretty quickly. At first, it takes longer to go through this process. But as time goes on, students learn the routine and can do most of the work with connecting the sounds to letters.

STEP 4: “Tap out” the word. To make the spelling more memorable, students tap out the word on their arm while spelling it aloud. (This is a multi-sensory strategy.)

Here’s a quick informal video to show you how we do this:

STEP 5: Write the word. I like to make this part multi-sensory, too.

In this step, students are writing the word AND creating a “bumpy word” that they can trace with their finger.

There are different ways to do this, but I like to have students place a piece of paper on top of a knitting screen (like this one – Amazon affiliate link). They use a crayon to write the words. You can have them spell the word aloud as they write.

Looking for a simple multi-sensory activity for sight words? In this activity, we write on top of a knitting screen, using a crayon! Students need to go over the word several times. Then, they can trace it with their finger while spelling it aloud.

Then, once students have written it (have them go over the word 3 times), they can use a finger to trace over the word and spell it out loud. When they practice the word in the future, they can take out this sheet and trace the “bumpy word” while spelling the word aloud.

STEP 6: As long as time permits, nbc holiday schedule 2020 students write an original sentence with the word and read their sentence aloud to a partner. We usually skip this step at the Kindergarten level. (Also, if you find that you’re frequently running out of time for this step, you might skip Step 2 so you have more time for this.)

Those six steps are how I introduce a new high frequency word!

In addition to this process, in my program, 2nd graders also keep a personal dictionary / word book that they add words to. (1st graders and Kindergarteners could also do this if you like.) This is a great tool for them to use as they’re writing.

All of this sounds like a lot, right? At first, it is! But once students learn the routine, things move more quickly.

Where can I get materials for teaching high frequency words?

Right now, my phonics program is the only resource I have that covers high frequency words extensively.

Each week of the program, students work on words that have a certain sound or spelling pattern – and they also learn a few high frequency words (that may or may not follow the pattern).

The high frequency words in the program don’t match any one specific list (i.e. Dolch or Fry). They were derived from a few different resources and designed specifically to equip students with words that will be useful to them in their reading and writing.

I hope that this post was helpful to you! Did anything surprise you? How does this compare with how you learned to teach high frequency words? I’d love to hear from you in the comments!

Last but not least, if you’d like a FREE scope and sequence for teaching phonics in K-2, grab mine here.

Happy teaching!

References

Blevins, W. (2017). A Fresh Look at Phonics, Grades K-2. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Miles, K. P., Rubin, G. B., & Gonzalez-Frey, S. (2018, May). Rethinking Sight Words. The Reading Teacher, 71(6), 715-726.

Do you know the best ways to teach high frequency words? This blog post.
Источник: https://learningattheprimarypond.com/blog/how-to-teach-sight-words/

There’s no doubt about it: Building a strong bank of sight words helps readers read and write more fluently and accurately. While we always want kids thinking about letter-sound correspondence in words, many high-frequency words break common phonetic rules. So what to do when “the” sounds like “th-uh” but is spelled t-h-e? Practice, practice, practice, of course! Check out this mega-list of low-prep, multi-sensory, and FUN sight word activities for kids to use in the classroom or at home.

1. Find and swat words

Sight word cards laid out in a grid pattern with a red fly swatter as an example of sight word activities for the classroom

An oldie but such a goodie. Find a word in an array and WHACK—swat it with a fly swatter.

Source: @kids_play_learn_laugh

2. Flip word pancakes

Sight words on cardboard circles that resemble pancakes with a small frying pan and spatula arranged on a white work surface

Serve up sight word pancakes while practicing spelling them aloud!

Source: @bee_happy_teaching

3. Hunt for treasure words in colored salt

Pink salt in a tray with colored sprinkles and a child's hand holding a paintbrush to brush salt off a card with the sight word "my"

Kids love using the paintbrush for “discovering” each word card.

Source:@loveforlittlelearners

4. Search for sight word balls

Small multicolored plastic ball pit balls with sight words written in chalk marker

Write sight words on ball pit balls with a chalk marker or dry erase marker. Kids can race around hunting for balls to read and toss in a basket or hunt through a big tub of balls for a certain word.

Source: @preschoolforyou

5. Start a sight word band

A teacher holding a wooden spoon in front of sticky notes with sight words stuck to various pots and pans and other metal objects

Loud but oh-so-fun! Feel the rhythm while tapping and reading sight words stuck to homemade percussion instruments.

Source: @reception_withmissf

6. Drive on a sight word path

Child's hand driving a toy car over a path of magnetic tiles with sight words written on them

This is one of many fun ways to use magnetic tiles for learning! Kids love “knocking down” word tiles with a toy car as they read each one.

Source: @travisntyler

7. Use sticky notes to inspire sight word sentences

Sticky note with the sight word "said" stuck to a pink child's bike helmet

Have kids stick words on items that give them ideas for sentences. “My Mom said to wear a helmet!” = so good!

Source: @kinneypodlearning

8. Write words on a sensory bag

A zip-top bag with blue paint inside with the word "and" traced onto it to match a sight 1st grade reading sight words card

So easy: Fill a zip-top bag with a small amount of paint, seal well, and have kids practice “writing” sight words with their finger or a cotton swab.

Source: @makeitmultisensory

9. Wear a sight word crown

Paper crown headbands printed with rightwards

Wear your word proudly and practice reading others’ words. Fun in person or virtually!

Source: @mrsjonescreationstation

10. Make a rock word wall

A variety of sight words written on small rocks in chalk

Fun to make and fun for play! Great for learning sight words outdoors.

Source: @heartsandhandshomeschool

11. Spell words to a familiar tune

Spell Words to a familiar tune

Get sight words stuck in everyone’s head, in a good way.

Source: @saysbre

12. Feed a word 1st grade reading sight words src="https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/Feed-A-Word-Monster.png" alt="Feed A Word Monster sight word activities" width="652" height="817">

Nom, nom, nom.

Source: @ecplayandlearn

13. Search for the pom-pom under sight word cups

Search for pom poms under sight word cups

Read all the words as you try to find the cup that hides the prize.

Source: @la.la.learning

14. Play sight word KABOOM

Play sight word kaboom

This classroom classic is perfect for sight words. If you need a refresher on the rules, teacher Jillian Starr covers them.

Source: @essentiallykinder

15. Roll and write words

Roll and write words for sight word activities

Roll, write, repeat.

Source: @mylittlepandamonium

16. Write words with rainbow colors

Write words with rainbow colors

Bonus points for smelly markers.

Source: @mylittlepandamonium

17. Trace words with flashlights

Trace words with flashlights

Stock up on batteries because kids never get tired of this!

Source: @giggleswithgreg

18. Find words in plastic eggs

Find words in a sensory bin

Give kids a checklist of words to find as they open each egg.

Source: @blooming_tots1

19. Spy words around the classroom

Spy words around the classrom

Just add a magnifying glass and clipboard to make kids feel like super sleuths!

Source: @readingcorneronline

20. Find words in the morning message

Spy words in the morning message

Don’t forget about old standbys! This is one of our favorite ways to get kids to recognize sight words in connected text.

Source: @tales_of_a_kinder_classroom

21. Build words with bricks

Build words with bricks

Such a great use of extra building bricks!

Source: @raysinkinder

22. Write words in sand

Write words in individual sandboxes

Easy-peasy to set up and keep neat if you use plastic pencil boxes.

Source: @teacherhacks

23. Spell words on a construction site

Make a word construction site

Bulldozing over each word to read it is the best part!

Source: @planningplaytime

24. Spell words with toy cars

Spell words with toy cars

Drive on over!

Source: @lozlovesprep

25. Park in a sight word “parking lot”

Park words in a sight words parking lot

This one is easy to modify based on whatever toys are available in the classroom or at home.

Source: @msbendersclassroom

26. “Plant” words in play dough

Plant words in play dough

Watch those reading skills grow!

Source: @planningplaytime

27. Build words in a sensory tub

Build words in a sensory tub

Because spelling is just more fun when your hands are covered in beans!

Source: @coffeeandspitup

28. Write words on a magnetic drawing board

Write words on a magnetic drawing board

That eraser track makes for a perfect word card holder!

Source: @moffattgirls

29. Or, write words on the window!

Write words on the window

Everyone wants a turn to write on the window!

Source: @kindergarten_matters

30. Shhh! Discover words written in invisible ink

Discover secret words written in invisible ink

Write words in white crayon and reveal them with watercolors on top!

Source: @teachstarter

31. Dot-paint words with a cotton swab

dot paint words with a cotton swab

Calming and effective.

Source: @sightwordactivities

32. “Type” words on a keyboard

type words on a keyboard cover

Busy day at the sight word office! Use a keyboard cover or any old keyboard.

Source: @lifebetweensummers

33. Read words before heading through the door

Read words before heading out the door

The line leader can double as the word pointer during transitions.

Source: @ms.rowekinder

34. Read the word the teacher’s wearing!

Read the word the teacher is wearing

Wait, is there something on my shirt?

Source: @theprimarypartner

35. Take a sight word cakewalk

Take a sight word cake walk

Choose a winning word when the music stops!

Source: @joyfulinkinder

36. Play sight word hopscotch

Play sight word hopscotch outdors

If you can’t get outdoors, tape on the floor works just as well.

Source: @wheretheliteracygrows

37. Jump, chant, and spell

Simply jump and spell

Great for the wiggles. Write a word on the ground and jump sideways to each letter while chanting a word’s spelling.

Source: @little.footsteps.big.learning

38. Go sight word bowling

Bowl those words right over

No bowling pins? Use half-filled plastic water bottles instead.

Source: @thecreativeteacher_

39. Ready, aim, read

Hit words with foam darts

Just throw a beanbag at a word target if foam darts are a no-go.

Source: @laurens_lil_learners

40. Play muffin tin ball toss

Toss a ball and read the word it lands on

Toss and read. It’s easy to use colored muffin cups to prep different sets of words.

Source: @homeschooling_fun_with_lynda

41. Read words to beat the clock

Read words to beat the clock

How many words can you read before the time is up?

Source: @creatinginkindergarten

42. Play sight word checkers

Sight words checkers

King me! If kids don’t have a partner available, they can “play” with a stuffed animal and get double practice.

Source: @sightwordactivities

43. Play sight word Guess Who?

Sight words guess who

Set up this game once and use it forever.

Source: @lessons_and_lattes

We’d love to hear—what are your favorite sight word activities? Share in the comments below.

Want more articles like this? Make sure to sign up for our newsletters.

Plus, what are sight words?

43 Creative and Simple Sight Word Activities for the Classroom

Источник: https://www.weareteachers.com/sight-word-activities/

Why?

The most important aspect of teaching sight words is teaching kids WHY they must memorize these whole words.Sight words have an important job because without them a lot of books and writing would not make sense. We’re learning them so we can enjoy a good story! As much as possible, point out sight words when you see them so your child cansee their role in stories.

Start easy

Focus on only one or two words for a week. Anymore than this before your child is ready will overwhelm and frustrate them. Remind them that a lot of times sight words don’t follow the spelling and sound rules, they can be tricky!

Paper Color Words

Once you’ve chosen a few words, write them clearly, in large, thick lowercase letters on a piece of paper or notecard. Write only one word per piece of paper or notecard. Have your child color the paper to give it a blue background or use color paper. Using any color will help the word stand out visually and in your child’s memory. You can use these cards like flash cards and review the words each day.

Word Boxing

Another technique to help student remember words it to “box” the letters. After you have written a sight word on a piece of paper, carefully draw a box around each letter. These boxes will help children visualize the words in their mind so they can retain them.

CLICK TO VIEW EXAMPLE OF WORD BOXING

Trace It and Tap It!

Try this quick 2 minute technique to help your child remember any sight word they have!

  1. Write a sight word on a note card or flash card in clear lowercase letter handwriting. Tell your child what the word is, then have them repeat it back to you.
  2. Have your child trace each letter on the flashcard using the back of a pen or pencil, say the name of each letter as they trace it. Then say the whole word while underlining it. Do this 2 more times.
  3. Now, trace the word on the table using their finger. Say each letter as you trace it then say the whole word while underlining it. Do this 2 times. Have them try to trace it from memory on their last try.
  4. Next, using the hand they write with, tap each letter of the word down their opposite arm. For example: how, “h” tap the shoulder, “o” tap the elbow, and “w” tap the wrist.
  5. Finally, have your child write the word in a notebook.
  6. Your child has mastered this new word when they can show you that they can read the word at least 5 times on their own, while its in the context of a book.

Add a Picture!

For many kids, it’s easier to visualize a picture with a word. If you’re writing sight words on note cards or pieces of paper, add a small picture or detail that might help them remember it. For example, for the word “my”, you could draw a small girl hugging the letter “y” to show her saying “my!” For the word “it”, you could draw a small creature that looks like a thing or an “it”. For the word “in”, you could draw the word “in” inside of a bubble.

Act it Out

All children benefit from acting out words. Bring a new word to life by creating a movement or gesture to help them build an association to the word. For example, for the word “my”, kids can wrap their arms around themselves and say “my” while looking at the word. For “you” they can point both their hands at you while repeating the word “you” they read from the card.

Tell Me a Sentence

Sight words are meaningless until we know how to use these words in our own conversations. Have your child tell you an original sentence using their new word. This can be challenging, so be ready to slow down with your child as they try to use their new word in a sentence and give lots of high fives when they can use it correctly.

Sight word: live

“We live in North Carolina, but my grandma lives in Georgia.”

Make Wormy Words

Using brightly colored yarn, cut out short (about 3 inches), medium (about 6 inches) and long (about 10 inches) pieces. Lay a blanket or bath  towel flat on the floor. Have your child form the sight words they are learning on the cloth using the pieces of yarn. This approach helps commit the word to their long-term memory.

Sight Word Ninja

Tell your child that sight words appear silently in the world around us. Every time your child spots a sight word out in the world of words, such as on coupon, in a story, or on a piece of mail, they should point it out and celebrate! The purpose of this activity is for students to get excited about recognizing words and to get a boost of confidence from knowing how to read them.

Источник: https://www.homereadinghelper.org/1st-grade-reading-skills-sight-words/

First Grade Sight Words Flash Cards

  • Curated 1st grade sight words flash cards from the Dolch and Fry lists to help prepare students for successful learning
  • Educational sight words for first grade readers ages 6-7
  • 100+ sight words per pack that cover up to 75% of the words found in 1st grade books
  • 6 teaching techniques and 6 fun educational games to learn sight words
  • Learning to read made easy with first grade flash cards

Think Tank Scholar Sight Words Flashcards help children in 1st grade to learn and practice reading the most common words found in first grade books.
Help your first grader build their vocabulary and greatly increase their level A reading skills by memorizing simple letter-to- sound high-frequency words that do not necessarily follow phonics rules.


Learning to recognize these words without decoding them increases a child’s reading speed accuracy, fluency, and comprehension. In addition, 6 teaching techniques and 6 sight word 1st grade games are included to help your children practice spelling and sentence structure.


Our cards are designed to make learning fun for young learners with a non-distracting design and large bold print that helps students automatically recognize words. The flash cards are made from high quality card stock with a smooth laminated coating and rounded edges for easy sorting and handling.
With over 100 words in the 1st grade flash cards pack you can teach your child words to master the reading skills needed for 1st grade and beyond.

The 6 fun sight word games include:

  • Complete the Sentence
  • Create a Sentence
  • Interactive Sentence
  • Slapjack
  • Search the Deck
  • Word Hunt

These Cards Meet the Following Common Core Standards:

  • ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2d
  • ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3c
  • ELA-Literacy.RF.1.2.B
  • ELA-Literacy.RF.1.3.F
  • ELA-Literacy.RF.2.3.E
  • ELA-Literacy.RF.2.3.F
Источник: https://www.thinktankscholar.com/products/first-grade-sight-word-flash-cards

Bob Books - Sight Words First Grade Box Set Phonics, Ages 4 and Up, First Grade, Flashcards (Stage 2: Emerging Reader) - by Lynn Maslen Kertell

About the Book



Sight words are words that must be recognized by sight rather than sounded out. They are the most frequently used words in the English language, such as "are," "was," and "out." Children who are learning to read are encouraged to practice and memorize this list of words, in order to become fluent readers (who are able to read for meaning rather than stumble over words). Sight words are taught primarily in kindergarten and first grade, though often the practice extends up through fourth grade.

BOB BOOKS have always incorporated sight words, though the sounding-out approach minimized their use. These will be the first BOB BOOKS products to focus on learning and practicing sight words. They will stand alone as two boxes - neither MY FIRST, nor numbered as a SET. Their noted grades (kindergarten or first) will serve as the level. The titles allow parents to choose whether to prep their children for next year, or reinforce what they've learned last year.

Book Synopsis



From the bestselling learn-to-read program comes a brand-new set of books dedicated entirely to SIGHT WORDS! First-grade edition.Sight words, or high frequency words, are words that appear repeatedly in your children's reading material. Knowing these words by sight is essential for reading speed and comprehension. Consistent short vowels and simple stories mean children sound out (decode) most of the story, and must memorize only three sight words per book. Your child will continue to build confidence and sight word fluency, with Bob Books Sight Words - First Grade.These ten books provide 30 more sight words, in slightly longer stories, to build confidence and success in the progressing reader. [CONTINUED]

About the Author



Sue Hendrahas illustrated several children's books including the Bob Books(R) learn-to-read sets Sight Words: Kindergarten, Sight Words: First Grade, Rhyming Words, and First Stories; and the Bob Books Stories series.
Lynn Maslen Kertell is the current manager of Bob Books(R) and the author of the Bob Books learn-to-read sets More Beginning Readers, Sight Words: Kindergarten, Sight Words: First Grade, Rhyming Words, First Stories, and Animal Stories; and the Bob Books Stories series. You can visit her online and learn more about Bob Books at bobbooks.com.
Источник: https://www.target.com/p/bob-books-sight-words-first-grade-box-set-phonics-ages-4-and-up-first-grade-flashcards-stage-2-emerging-reader-by-lynn-maslen-kertell/-/A-82744007

Fry Word List - 1,000 High Frequency Words

The Fry word list or "instant words" are widely accepted to contain the most used words in reading and writing. The sight words list is divided into ten levels and then divided into groups of twenty-five words, based on frequency of use and difficulty.

It is important for young readers to instantly recognize these high frequency words by sight in order to build up their reading fluency. It is also important for readers to practice words in meaningful context through phrase and sentence reading practice. As a follow up activity, students can practice writing short sentences including Fry words.

As you individually meet with the student, you’ll quickly be able to identify words that they are having trouble with. Also, as students write in their journals and read aloud, regular misspellings and misuse can provide you with a target list of words to teach first or spend more time on. Don't forget to check out all of our vocabulary worksheets and Dolch Sight Words.

Fry Words – Complete list of 1,000 Words

Fry Words – Complete list of 1,000 Words

This includes all 1,000 Fry Words from the 1st – 10th levels.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, 4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade

Fry Words – The 1st Hundred

mexico central america and the caribbean map alt="Fry Words – The 1st Hundred">

Here’s the first level of the 1,000 Fry words.

Grade Levels:
Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade
CCSS Code(s):
RF.K.3.C, RF.1.3.G

Fry Words – The 3rd Hundred

Fry Words – The 3rd Hundred

This page is the list of the third one hundred words on the Fry list.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.3.3.D

Fry Words – The 2nd Hundred

Fry Words – The 2nd Hundred

This is the second one hundred Fry words.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.2.3.F

Fry Words – The 9th Hundred

Fry Words – The 9th Hundred

The ninth one hundred words from the Fry list can be found here.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 4th Hundred

Fry Words – The 4th Hundred

The Fry “instant word” list has these as the fourth one hundred words.

Grade Levels:
4th 1st grade reading sight words 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 10th Hundred

Fry Words – The 10th Hundred

This is the final level of the Fry 1,000 word list, featuring the tenth one hundred words.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades Is walmart open today thanksgiving day Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 5th Hundred

Fry Words – The 5th Hundred

Here’s the fifth one hundred of the 1,000 Fry words.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 6th Hundred

Fry Words – The 6th Hundred

This is the 6th level of one hundred words from the Fry word list.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 7th Hundred

Fry Words – The 7th Hundred

Here’s the seventh one hundred words on the Fry “instant words” list.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 8th Hundred

Fry Words – The 8th Hundred

This page has the eighth one hundred words from the Fry 1,000 word list.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A
Источник: https://www.k12reader.com/subject/vocabulary/fry-words/

K-2 Resources: Reading Like a Pro

Basic Skills

Reading begins by connecting printed symbols with sounds. Next, the reader applies the rules of letters and sounds to identify words. Older readers use these same skills to break down complicated vocabulary into understandable units or syllables. All these important skills help to “crack the code” of reading and writing for understanding. And it all begins with 26 letters and about 44 sounds. Amazing!

General Resources

Have you heard your child’s teacher mention “phonics” before and wondered what they were really talking about? Phonics is the relationship between the letters of written language and the individual sounds those letters make. Your child is learning how to put the letters and sounds together to create words. Below you will find some information on phonics and some great activities you can use at home to reinforce the basic reading skills your child is learning at school.

​Match up Sounds and Letters

Using flash cards, match the sound spoken with the letter that makes that sound. Start out using only 3-5 letter cards. First, you produce the sound and ask your child to choose the letter that makes that sound. For example, you say the sound the letter s makes and your child responds by make the sound—sssss. Later, switch roles and you must find the letter that matched the sound they produce. Start small. Use only a few letter sound cards and play often. Do not move on until the first sounds are AUTOMATIC! A variation of this would be to have your child find objects that start with and end with same and different sounds.

Match up Spoken and Written Words

Using flash cards, match the spoken word with the letters that spell that word. Start using only 3-5 sight word cards. First you say the word, and then he chooses the card with that word. For example, you say the word, cat and your child selects the card with the written word cat. Later, switch roles and you find the word that matched the one spoken. Start small. Use only a few sight word cards and play often. Do not move on until the first words are AUTOMATIC! A variation of this would be to see how fast the cards can be read.

Word Family Reunion

A Word Family for early readers is a group of words that rhyme or have the same end sound, like hop, pop and top. This is the –OP family! Thing, bring and sing is the –ING family. Copy the Word Family cards TWICE and play Word Family Concentration. Turn the cards face down, mix them up and put them in rows. Taking turns, each player turns two cards over in hopes of finding an exact match. Once you find a matching pair, it is yours to keep. The player with the most cards wins.

Reading Fluently: The Right Speed, Accuracy and Expression

Fluency--what is it? It is the ability to read at the right speed, accurately and with expression. It is the ability to make reading FLOW! We want our children to read fluently so that they understand what they read. How does one improve fluency? By reading! There are many things we can do to develop fluent readers.

General Resources

Looking for some general information on reading fluency? How about some great tips for building fluency at home? Look no further. You have come to the right spot!

Speed Read Your Letters!

Print the Letter Sound Fluency activity sheet and see how quickly your child can identify letters and nonsense words. Repeat this activity often until your child is reading all letters automatically!

Repeated Readings and Phrases

Repeated readings are excellent! Use 10 phrases from the list below and copy them on slips of paper. Challenge your child to read them as quickly as possible. Once mastered, create another list and continue the fun.

Additional Activities

If you’re still looking for fluency ideas, here are more resources to expand your activities and develop students who read like a PRO!

Building a Strong Vocabulary

Why is vocabulary important? Creating a home environment that is rich in both print and the spoken word is critical to your child’s language development. Help your child build a rich vocabulary to become an effective reader and writer.

At Home Ideas

Looking for some great tips for building vocabulary at home? Look no further. You have come to the right spot!

Refrigerator Word Banks

The “fridge” is a great place to save words and develop word families. For early readers, focus on a single letter and “collect” all the words that begin with that letter. Later, you can collect words in a theme, like KITCHEN words, ANIMAL words or words that make sounds like POW!

A Word A Day

Introduce a new word each day. Encourage each family member to keep track of how many times they 1st grade reading sight words able to use the new word throughout the day so you can discuss it each evening. Have your child try and use the new word in a sentence when you are out and about or at the dinner table. Write the new word of the day on the bathroom mirror using a dry-erase marker. Have your child record the new word in a journal along with a definition and illustration. Keep it up every day and your child will add 365 new words to their vocabulary each year!

Websites Worth Visiting

Connecting Real-World Experiences to What Your Child Is Reading

For children to truly understand what they read, they must have some experience with the topic to connect the new information to their understanding of the world. We can read a how-to manual on replacing a carburetor, but unless we have some basic understanding of car engines, we will never understand it. Likewise, children need many real-world experiences in order to understand what they are reading. Those experiences can be either real (trip to the zoo) or virtual (read a book or watch a video). It is essential that children build vast knowledge of the world around them in order to become great readers and writers.

Ways to Build Knowledge

Helping your child call to memory what he already knows about a topic before reading a text really helps him to connect the new learning to what he already knows. Teachers call this activating prior knowledge.

Connect lessons from texts with experiences from your life. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Fables teach values and morals.
  • Look for texts that include cultural history and storytelling.
  • Consider texts that describe scientific processes as applied to recycling or space exploration.
  • Use the Internet to dig deeper.

Field Trips

Of course a trip to a museum or the zoo is an obvious way to build a child’s understanding of the world, but there are many ways to develop understanding right in your backyard! Share your hobby, use public transportation and explain how it works, take apart an old electronic device, prepare a favorite recipe, listen to a genre of music—the sky is the limit. Just remember to ask questions, give explanations, write a review when the activity is complete or create a photo compilation of the event.

Brainstorming Sessions

What is brainstorming? It is bringing up a real-world problem (problems that are meaningful to younger children may include littering, messy bedroom, chores, forgetting to brush teeth, etc.) and trying to find solutions. However, there are some very important rules regarding the sharing of ideas and solutions. Most importantly, there is no such thing as a dumb idea! All ideas are welcome and encouraged. Out of someone’s zany idea might come a perfect solution to a problem. Take a look at the Rules for Brainstorming Sessions and try it at your next family dinner.

Understanding What Is Read

Reading 1st grade reading sight words words and sentences in a text is only half the job. The other half requires understanding what is read. The purpose of reading is to get meaning from the written passage. Sometimes children learn to read the words of a text, without understanding the information within it. Comprehension is the ability to understand what is read and it is important to becoming an accomplished reader.

Probing Questions

Hold a conversation and discuss what your child has read. Ask your child probing questions about the book. For example, say, "I wonder why that girl did that?" or "How do you think he felt? Why?" and "So, what lesson can we learn here?"

Making Connections

Encourage your child to make connections while reading. By making connections to things he already knows, his comprehension will increase.

Think Aloud

Children learn when they make connections between what they read and what they know. One method parents can use to help make these connections is called a think aloud, where you talk through your thoughts as you read. Use the think aloud method with anything you read. You can apply it to a television show, a play or even a movie. Ask questions that encourage your child to draw conclusions, predict what happens next or determine motivations.

Источник: http://www.fldoe.org/academics/standards/just-read-fl/just-take-20/families/k-2/k2-reading.stml
1st grade reading sight words

1st grade reading sight words -

K-2 Resources: Reading Like a Pro

Basic Skills

Reading begins by connecting printed symbols with sounds. Next, the reader applies the rules of letters and sounds to identify words. Older readers use these same skills to break down complicated vocabulary into understandable units or syllables. All these important skills help to “crack the code” of reading and writing for understanding. And it all begins with 26 letters and about 44 sounds. Amazing!

General Resources

Have you heard your child’s teacher mention “phonics” before and wondered what they were really talking about? Phonics is the relationship between the letters of written language and the individual sounds those letters make. Your child is learning how to put the letters and sounds together to create words. Below you will find some information on phonics and some great activities you can use at home to reinforce the basic reading skills your child is learning at school.

​Match up Sounds and Letters

Using flash cards, match the sound spoken with the letter that makes that sound. Start out using only 3-5 letter cards. First, you produce the sound and ask your child to choose the letter that makes that sound. For example, you say the sound the letter s makes and your child responds by make the sound—sssss. Later, switch roles and you must find the letter that matched the sound they produce. Start small. Use only a few letter sound cards and play often. Do not move on until the first sounds are AUTOMATIC! A variation of this would be to have your child find objects that start with and end with same and different sounds.

Match up Spoken and Written Words

Using flash cards, match the spoken word with the letters that spell that word. Start using only 3-5 sight word cards. First you say the word, and then he chooses the card with that word. For example, you say the word, cat and your child selects the card with the written word cat. Later, switch roles and you find the word that matched the one spoken. Start small. Use only a few sight word cards and play often. Do not move on until the first words are AUTOMATIC! A variation of this would be to see how fast the cards can be read.

Word Family Reunion

A Word Family for early readers is a group of words that rhyme or have the same end sound, like hop, pop and top. This is the –OP family! Thing, bring and sing is the –ING family. Copy the Word Family cards TWICE and play Word Family Concentration. Turn the cards face down, mix them up and put them in rows. Taking turns, each player turns two cards over in hopes of finding an exact match. Once you find a matching pair, it is yours to keep. The player with the most cards wins.

Reading Fluently: The Right Speed, Accuracy and Expression

Fluency--what is it? It is the ability to read at the right speed, accurately and with expression. It is the ability to make reading FLOW! We want our children to read fluently so that they understand what they read. How does one improve fluency? By reading! There are many things we can do to develop fluent readers.

General Resources

Looking for some general information on reading fluency? How about some great tips for building fluency at home? Look no further. You have come to the right spot!

Speed Read Your Letters!

Print the Letter Sound Fluency activity sheet and see how quickly your child can identify letters and nonsense words. Repeat this activity often until your child is reading all letters automatically!

Repeated Readings and Phrases

Repeated readings are excellent! Use 10 phrases from the list below and copy them on slips of paper. Challenge your child to read them as quickly as possible. Once mastered, create another list and continue the fun.

Additional Activities

If you’re still looking for fluency ideas, here are more resources to expand your activities and develop students who read like a PRO!

Building a Strong Vocabulary

Why is vocabulary important? Creating a home environment that is rich in both print and the spoken word is critical to your child’s language development. Help your child build a rich vocabulary to become an effective reader and writer.

At Home Ideas

Looking for some great tips for building vocabulary at home? Look no further. You have come to the right spot!

Refrigerator Word Banks

The “fridge” is a great place to save words and develop word families. For early readers, focus on a single letter and “collect” all the words that begin with that letter. Later, you can collect words in a theme, like KITCHEN words, ANIMAL words or words that make sounds like POW!

A Word A Day

Introduce a new word each day. Encourage each family member to keep track of how many times they were able to use the new word throughout the day so you can discuss it each evening. Have your child try and use the new word in a sentence when you are out and about or at the dinner table. Write the new word of the day on the bathroom mirror using a dry-erase marker. Have your child record the new word in a journal along with a definition and illustration. Keep it up every day and your child will add 365 new words to their vocabulary each year!

Websites Worth Visiting

Connecting Real-World Experiences to What Your Child Is Reading

For children to truly understand what they read, they must have some experience with the topic to connect the new information to their understanding of the world. We can read a how-to manual on replacing a carburetor, but unless we have some basic understanding of car engines, we will never understand it. Likewise, children need many real-world experiences in order to understand what they are reading. Those experiences can be either real (trip to the zoo) or virtual (read a book or watch a video). It is essential that children build vast knowledge of the world around them in order to become great readers and writers.

Ways to Build Knowledge

Helping your child call to memory what he already knows about a topic before reading a text really helps him to connect the new learning to what he already knows. Teachers call this activating prior knowledge.

Connect lessons from texts with experiences from your life. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Fables teach values and morals.
  • Look for texts that include cultural history and storytelling.
  • Consider texts that describe scientific processes as applied to recycling or space exploration.
  • Use the Internet to dig deeper.

Field Trips

Of course a trip to a museum or the zoo is an obvious way to build a child’s understanding of the world, but there are many ways to develop understanding right in your backyard! Share your hobby, use public transportation and explain how it works, take apart an old electronic device, prepare a favorite recipe, listen to a genre of music—the sky is the limit. Just remember to ask questions, give explanations, write a review when the activity is complete or create a photo compilation of the event.

Brainstorming Sessions

What is brainstorming? It is bringing up a real-world problem (problems that are meaningful to younger children may include littering, messy bedroom, chores, forgetting to brush teeth, etc.) and trying to find solutions. However, there are some very important rules regarding the sharing of ideas and solutions. Most importantly, there is no such thing as a dumb idea! All ideas are welcome and encouraged. Out of someone’s zany idea might come a perfect solution to a problem. Take a look at the Rules for Brainstorming Sessions and try it at your next family dinner.

Understanding What Is Read

Reading the words and sentences in a text is only half the job. The other half requires understanding what is read. The purpose of reading is to get meaning from the written passage. Sometimes children learn to read the words of a text, without understanding the information within it. Comprehension is the ability to understand what is read and it is important to becoming an accomplished reader.

Probing Questions

Hold a conversation and discuss what your child has read. Ask your child probing questions about the book. For example, say, "I wonder why that girl did that?" or "How do you think he felt? Why?" and "So, what lesson can we learn here?"

Making Connections

Encourage your child to make connections while reading. By making connections to things he already knows, his comprehension will increase.

Think Aloud

Children learn when they make connections between what they read and what they know. One method parents can use to help make these connections is called a think aloud, where you talk through your thoughts as you read. Use the think aloud method with anything you read. You can apply it to a television show, a play or even a movie. Ask questions that encourage your child to draw conclusions, predict what happens next or determine motivations.

Источник: http://www.fldoe.org/academics/standards/just-read-fl/just-take-20/families/k-2/k2-reading.stml

Fry Word List - 1,000 High Frequency Words

The Fry word list or "instant words" are widely accepted to contain the most used words in reading and writing. The sight words list is divided into ten levels and then divided into groups of twenty-five words, based on frequency of use and difficulty.

It is important for young readers to instantly recognize these high frequency words by sight in order to build up their reading fluency. It is also important for readers to practice words in meaningful context through phrase and sentence reading practice. As a follow up activity, students can practice writing short sentences including Fry words.

As you individually meet with the student, you’ll quickly be able to identify words that they are having trouble with. Also, as students write in their journals and read aloud, regular misspellings and misuse can provide you with a target list of words to teach first or spend more time on. Don't forget to check out all of our vocabulary worksheets and Dolch Sight Words.

Fry Words – Complete list of 1,000 Words

Fry Words – Complete list of 1,000 Words

This includes all 1,000 Fry Words from the 1st – 10th levels.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, 4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade

Fry Words – The 1st Hundred

Fry Words – The 1st Hundred

Here’s the first level of the 1,000 Fry words.

Grade Levels:
Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade
CCSS Code(s):
RF.K.3.C, RF.1.3.G

Fry Words – The 3rd Hundred

Fry Words – The 3rd Hundred

This page is the list of the third one hundred words on the Fry list.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.3.3.D

Fry Words – The 2nd Hundred

Fry Words – The 2nd Hundred

This is the second one hundred Fry words.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.2.3.F

Fry Words – The 9th Hundred

Fry Words  – The 9th Hundred

The ninth one hundred words from the Fry list can be found here.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 4th Hundred

Fry Words – The 4th Hundred

The Fry “instant word” list has these as the fourth one hundred words.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 10th Hundred

Fry Words – The 10th Hundred

This is the final level of the Fry 1,000 word list, featuring the tenth one hundred words.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 5th Hundred

Fry Words – The 5th Hundred

Here’s the fifth one hundred of the 1,000 Fry words.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 6th Hundred

Fry Words – The 6th Hundred

This is the 6th level of one hundred words from the Fry word list.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 7th Hundred

Fry Words – The 7th Hundred

Here’s the seventh one hundred words on the Fry “instant words” list.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A

Fry Words – The 8th Hundred

Fry Words – The 8th Hundred

This page has the eighth one hundred words from the Fry 1,000 word list.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
RF.4.3.A, RF.5.3.A
Источник: https://www.k12reader.com/subject/vocabulary/fry-words/

There’s no doubt about it: Building a strong bank of sight words helps readers read and write more fluently and accurately. While we always want kids thinking about letter-sound correspondence in words, many high-frequency words break common phonetic rules. So what to do when “the” sounds like “th-uh” but is spelled t-h-e? Practice, practice, practice, of course! Check out this mega-list of low-prep, multi-sensory, and FUN sight word activities for kids to use in the classroom or at home.

1. Find and swat words

Sight word cards laid out in a grid pattern with a red fly swatter as an example of sight word activities for the classroom

An oldie but such a goodie. Find a word in an array and WHACK—swat it with a fly swatter.

Source: @kids_play_learn_laugh

2. Flip word pancakes

Sight words on cardboard circles that resemble pancakes with a small frying pan and spatula arranged on a white work surface

Serve up sight word pancakes while practicing spelling them aloud!

Source: @bee_happy_teaching

3. Hunt for treasure words in colored salt

Pink salt in a tray with colored sprinkles and a child's hand holding a paintbrush to brush salt off a card with the sight word "my"

Kids love using the paintbrush for “discovering” each word card.

Source:@loveforlittlelearners

4. Search for sight word balls

Small multicolored plastic ball pit balls with sight words written in chalk marker

Write sight words on ball pit balls with a chalk marker or dry erase marker. Kids can race around hunting for balls to read and toss in a basket or hunt through a big tub of balls for a certain word.

Source: @preschoolforyou

5. Start a sight word band

A teacher holding a wooden spoon in front of sticky notes with sight words stuck to various pots and pans and other metal objects

Loud but oh-so-fun! Feel the rhythm while tapping and reading sight words stuck to homemade percussion instruments.

Source: @reception_withmissf

6. Drive on a sight word path

Child's hand driving a toy car over a path of magnetic tiles with sight words written on them

This is one of many fun ways to use magnetic tiles for learning! Kids love “knocking down” word tiles with a toy car as they read each one.

Source: @travisntyler

7. Use sticky notes to inspire sight word sentences

Sticky note with the sight word "said" stuck to a pink child's bike helmet

Have kids stick words on items that give them ideas for sentences. “My Mom said to wear a helmet!” = so good!

Source: @kinneypodlearning

8. Write words on a sensory bag

A zip-top bag with blue paint inside with the word "and" traced onto it to match a sight word card

So easy: Fill a zip-top bag with a small amount of paint, seal well, and have kids practice “writing” sight words with their finger or a cotton swab.

Source: @makeitmultisensory

9. Wear a sight word crown

Paper crown headbands printed with rightwards

Wear your word proudly and practice reading others’ words. Fun in person or virtually!

Source: @mrsjonescreationstation

10. Make a rock word wall

A variety of sight words written on small rocks in chalk

Fun to make and fun for play! Great for learning sight words outdoors.

Source: @heartsandhandshomeschool

11. Spell words to a familiar tune

Spell Words to a familiar tune

Get sight words stuck in everyone’s head, in a good way.

Source: @saysbre

12. Feed a word monster

Feed A Word Monster sight word activities

Nom, nom, nom.

Source: @ecplayandlearn

13. Search for the pom-pom under sight word cups

Search for pom poms under sight word cups

Read all the words as you try to find the cup that hides the prize.

Source: @la.la.learning

14. Play sight word KABOOM

Play sight word kaboom

This classroom classic is perfect for sight words. If you need a refresher on the rules, teacher Jillian Starr covers them.

Source: @essentiallykinder

15. Roll and write words

Roll and write words for sight word activities

Roll, write, repeat.

Source: @mylittlepandamonium

16. Write words with rainbow colors

Write words with rainbow colors

Bonus points for smelly markers.

Source: @mylittlepandamonium

17. Trace words with flashlights

Trace words with flashlights

Stock up on batteries because kids never get tired of this!

Source: @giggleswithgreg

18. Find words in plastic eggs

Find words in a sensory bin

Give kids a checklist of words to find as they open each egg.

Source: @blooming_tots1

19. Spy words around the classroom

Spy words around the classrom

Just add a magnifying glass and clipboard to make kids feel like super sleuths!

Source: @readingcorneronline

20. Find words in the morning message

Spy words in the morning message

Don’t forget about old standbys! This is one of our favorite ways to get kids to recognize sight words in connected text.

Source: @tales_of_a_kinder_classroom

21. Build words with bricks

Build words with bricks

Such a great use of extra building bricks!

Source: @raysinkinder

22. Write words in sand

Write words in individual sandboxes

Easy-peasy to set up and keep neat if you use plastic pencil boxes.

Source: @teacherhacks

23. Spell words on a construction site

Make a word construction site

Bulldozing over each word to read it is the best part!

Source: @planningplaytime

24. Spell words with toy cars

Spell words with toy cars

Drive on over!

Source: @lozlovesprep

25. Park in a sight word “parking lot”

Park words in a sight words parking lot

This one is easy to modify based on whatever toys are available in the classroom or at home.

Source: @msbendersclassroom

26. “Plant” words in play dough

Plant words in play dough

Watch those reading skills grow!

Source: @planningplaytime

27. Build words in a sensory tub

Build words in a sensory tub

Because spelling is just more fun when your hands are covered in beans!

Source: @coffeeandspitup

28. Write words on a magnetic drawing board

Write words on a magnetic drawing board

That eraser track makes for a perfect word card holder!

Source: @moffattgirls

29. Or, write words on the window!

Write words on the window

Everyone wants a turn to write on the window!

Source: @kindergarten_matters

30. Shhh! Discover words written in invisible ink

Discover secret words written in invisible ink

Write words in white crayon and reveal them with watercolors on top!

Source: @teachstarter

31. Dot-paint words with a cotton swab

dot paint words with a cotton swab

Calming and effective.

Source: @sightwordactivities

32. “Type” words on a keyboard

type words on a keyboard cover

Busy day at the sight word office! Use a keyboard cover or any old keyboard.

Source: @lifebetweensummers

33. Read words before heading through the door

Read words before heading out the door

The line leader can double as the word pointer during transitions.

Source: @ms.rowekinder

34. Read the word the teacher’s wearing!

Read the word the teacher is wearing

Wait, is there something on my shirt?

Source: @theprimarypartner

35. Take a sight word cakewalk

Take a sight word cake walk

Choose a winning word when the music stops!

Source: @joyfulinkinder

36. Play sight word hopscotch

Play sight word hopscotch outdors

If you can’t get outdoors, tape on the floor works just as well.

Source: @wheretheliteracygrows

37. Jump, chant, and spell

Simply jump and spell

Great for the wiggles. Write a word on the ground and jump sideways to each letter while chanting a word’s spelling.

Source: @little.footsteps.big.learning

38. Go sight word bowling

Bowl those words right over

No bowling pins? Use half-filled plastic water bottles instead.

Source: @thecreativeteacher_

39. Ready, aim, read

Hit words with foam darts

Just throw a beanbag at a word target if foam darts are a no-go.

Source: @laurens_lil_learners

40. Play muffin tin ball toss

Toss a ball and read the word it lands on

Toss and read. It’s easy to use colored muffin cups to prep different sets of words.

Source: @homeschooling_fun_with_lynda

41. Read words to beat the clock

Read words to beat the clock

How many words can you read before the time is up?

Source: @creatinginkindergarten

42. Play sight word checkers

Sight words checkers

King me! If kids don’t have a partner available, they can “play” with a stuffed animal and get double practice.

Source: @sightwordactivities

43. Play sight word Guess Who?

Sight words guess who

Set up this game once and use it forever.

Source: @lessons_and_lattes

We’d love to hear—what are your favorite sight word activities? Share in the comments below.

Want more articles like this? Make sure to sign up for our newsletters.

Plus, what are sight words?

43 Creative and Simple Sight Word Activities for the Classroom

Источник: https://www.weareteachers.com/sight-word-activities/

How is your first grader’s reading? Do they sound more like a stop-and-go robot than a smooth, confident reader? How can we help beginning readers improve their reading fluency? Two words: Sight Words! Using activities like these free printable first grade sight words worksheets are an awesome way to build fluency!

How can we help beginning readers improve their reading fluency? Two words: Sight Words! Using activities like these free printable first grade sight words worksheets are an awesome way to build fluency!

What Are Sight Words?

Sight words are exactly what they sound like…words readers automatically know when they see them. The reader has actually memorized the words to immediately recognize and read them without trying to say the letter sounds or use any other decoding strategy.

 Bob Books: Sight Words – KindergartenBob Books: Sight Words - Kindergarten Kindergarten Sight Words T-shirt for Kindergarten TeachersKindergarten Sight Words T-shirt for Kindergarten Teachers Sight Word Tales: 25 Read-Aloud Storybooks That Target & Teach the Top 100 Sight WordsSight Word Tales: 25 Read-Aloud Storybooks That Target & Teach the Top 100 Sight Words

 

Why Do We Teach Sight Words?

Sight words are frequently used throughout text and once children learn them, it makes reading easier for them. Then they can spend their energy on decoding more difficult words. Reading fluency and comprehension also begins to improve. Additionally, their confidence as a reader increases with every, “I KNOW THAT WORD!!”

How can we help beginning readers improve their reading fluency? Two words: Sight Words! Using activities like these free printable first grade sight words worksheets are an awesome way to build fluency!

Dolch, Fry, High Frequency Words…OH MY!

Google the phrase: ‘Sight Words List.’ Your search request will result in pages and pages of all different types of word lists. So which word list do children need to learn? You Guessed It–ALL of them!

Of course they’re all important for readers to learn, but the Dolch Sight Words List is the most commonly used to teach sight words. There’s a total of 220 words on the Dolch Words List. The words are grouped by grade-level, starting with Pre-K and going through 3rd Grade.

First Grade Dolch Words List

The First Grade Dolch Sight Words List contains 41 words. Those words are featured in this printable sight words packet. Words Included: after, again, an, any, as, ask, by, could, every, fly, from, give, going, had, has, her, him, his, how, just, know, let, live, may, of, old, once, open, over, put, round, some, stop, take, thank, them, then, think, walk, were, when.

How can we help beginning readers improve their reading fluency? Two words: Sight Words! Using activities like these free printable first grade sight words worksheets are an awesome way to build fluency!

Printable Worksheets

Each worksheet has six different activities to give beginning readers lots
of practice working with the first grade sight words. Children will read the word,
trace the word, build the word, write the word, rainbow write the word, and find and color the word.

The black and white worksheets are low ink printables to help you save on a
hot commodity–your printer’s ink. Save even more ink by printing a set and
putting them in sleeve protectors–Instant Word Work Centers!

Intervention Resources

These printable worksheets are perfect to use as interventions for students, too. Differinating the worksheets to create six different small group or center
activities is easy with just some card stock, lamination, and a pair of scissors!

Print the sight word activity worksheets on cover stock, laminate some of them, and then cut the activities apart.

  • The ‘read the word’ activity becomes a set of flash cards or word wall words
  • Hide ‘read the word’ or ‘rainbow write words’ around the classroom for students to find and write
  • Use the ‘read the word’ activity and different Reading Materials for children to recognize the words in text
  • Dry erase markers or playdough can be used with the ‘trace the word’ activity
  • Use Letter Magnets with the ‘build the word’ activity to spell words
  • Dry erase markers make the ‘write the word’ activity perfect for small group time–you say the word or show the word and have them write it from memory or copy it for those students just learning the sight words
  • ‘Rainbow write the word’ becomes a fine-motor skills center when children usebeans, beads, small pompoms, or any other small manipulative to fill in the letters
  • Have children color the vowels one color and the consonants other with the ‘rainbow write words’
  • Use the ‘find and color the word’ activity as a check-for-understanding center where students color the focused sight words of the center
  • Make two copies of ‘read the word’ or ‘rainbow write the word’ for all sorts of additional fun Sight Word Games
  • Have students make their own sight words resource book gluing any of the activities in a notebook

 ThinkFun Zingo Sight Words Award Winning Early Reading Game for Pre-K to 2nd Grade – Toy of the Year Finalist, A Fun and Educational Game Developed by Educators for Boys and GirlsThinkFun Zingo Sight Words Award Winning Early Reading Game for Pre-K to 2nd Grade - Toy of the Year Finalist, A Fun and Educational Game Developed by Educators for Boys and Girls Learning Resources Slam Ships Sight Words Game, Homeschool, Visual, Tactile and Auditory Learning, Ages 5+Learning Resources Slam Ships Sight Words Game, Homeschool, Visual, Tactile and Auditory Learning, Ages 5+ Learning Resources Sight Word Swat a Sight Word Game, Home School, Visual, Tactile and Auditory Learning, Phonics Games, Easter Gifts for Kids, 114 Pieces, Easter Games, Ages 5+Learning Resources Sight Word Swat a Sight Word Game, Home School, Visual, Tactile and Auditory Learning, Phonics Games, Easter Gifts for Kids, 114 Pieces, Easter Games, Ages 5+ Learning Resources Pop For Sight Words Game, Vocabulary/Literacy Game, 92 Cards, Ages 5+Learning Resources Pop For Sight Words Game, Vocabulary/Literacy Game, 92 Cards, Ages 5+ Sight Words Bingo – Language Building Skill Game for Home or Classroom (T6064), Build Vocabulary with 46 Most-Used Words, 3 – 36 players, Age 5 and up, Cover the Spaces Needed to Win & Call BingoSight Words Bingo - Language Building Skill Game for Home or Classroom (T6064), Build Vocabulary with 46 Most-Used Words, 3 - 36 players, Age 5 and up, Cover the Spaces Needed to Win & Call Bingo

 

How can we help beginning readers improve their reading fluency? Two words: Sight Words! Using activities like these free printable first grade sight words worksheets are an awesome way to build fluency!

FREE…Don’t You Just Love That Word?!

You’ll receive instant worksheet access to ALL 41 of the words on the First Grade Dolch Words List completely FREE of charge! That’s right–I’m not
trying to tease you with just a few sample worksheets and then charge you if
you want to print the rest of the words on the list. Download all 41 kid-friendly, printable worksheets, one worksheet page for each sight word on the First Grade Sight Words List.

Other Grade-Level Packets Available

Once children have mastered the Pre-K and Kindergarten Sight Words from the previous packets and have learn the words from this 1st Grade Sight Words packet, they’re ready for the 2nd Grade Words. The FREE Printable Second Grade Sight Words Worksheet packet includes the 46 words on the Second Grade Dolch Words List.

Download all of the Printable Sight Words Worksheet Packets to teach, differentiate, and use as interventions to meet the needs of every student. That’s 220 FREE Sight Words Worksheets featuring all of the 220 Pre-K/Pre-Primer, Kindergarten/Primer, 1st Grade, 2nd Grade, and 3rd Grade Dolch Sight Words!

More Activities You’ll Love

Источник: https://lifeovercs.com/free-printable-first-grade-sight-words-worksheets/

Reading is a complex skill that requires lots of little processes coming together to make sense from a bunch of symbols on the page. And as your child begins to master age-appropriate books in first grade, they'll be using a lot of different strategies to read.

Much of the work of reading is spent decoding words by segmenting into sounds then blending them together to make words. For instance, the way the word "cat" can be separated into the sounds c, a, and t, and sounded out to make the word "cat." However, some words cannot be easily sounded out, and since they often appear in text, it helps for kids to be able to recognize them with just one look. Enter the concept of sight words.

Sight words need to be recognized at a glance, and parents can help kids to learn these important words in a number of ways. Here's what they're all about, plus ways you can help your first grader master them.

Dolch Words

The most common sight words are available in lists compiled by educational experts more than 70 years ago. Dr. Edward Dolch produced his word list for kids aged PreK through to Grade 3. His list is still used in schools today and includes over 200 words.

Fry Words

Dr. Edward Fry expanded on these word lists for grades 1-10 developing a bank of the 1,000 most commonly used words. Dolch words are the ones your child will encounter first as they learn to read and include words like: and, away, big, blue, can, come, down, find, for, funny, go, help, here. Fry words are the expanded bank of keywords that children learn as they go into the third grade and beyond, they include: almost, along, always, began, between.

You can find Dolch word lists here and Fry word lists here.

Grade 1 Sight Words List

Dolch's list of first grade sight words includes 41 words building on those learned in Kindergarten. Here they are:

  • After

  • Again

  • An

  • Any

  • As

  • Ask

  • By

  • Could

  • Every

  • Fly

  • From

  • Give

  • Going

  • Had

  • Has

  • Her

  • Him

  • His

  • How

  • Just

  • Know

  • Let

  • Live

  • May

  • Of

  • Old

  • Once

  • Open

  • Over

  • Put

  • Round

  • Some

  • Stop

  • Take

  • Thank

  • Them

  • Then

  • Think

  • Walk

  • Were

  • When

How to Practice Sight Words at Home

Learning sight words is an important part of developing early reading skills, but it can seem a little dull to children. Incorporate these games and fun activities as well as simply enjoying books together to help keep things interesting. With this practice, your child will soon be reading the goodnight story to you!

Write 5-7 sight words on sticky notes and put them up around the house

Quiz your child on these words throughout the day. You can also keep kids active at the same time by asking them to jog/skip/jump when they get to particular words. Feel free to swap the words over as your child masters them, but be sure to circle back and consolidate their knowledge.

Play the question game

Kids love to answer questions, so write these two sight words on their own cards: "when" and "how." Then let your child ask you questions so long as they can select and read aloud the right question word.

Play Go Fish

Start with ten sight words at a time and write them out twice on cards to make a pair. Play Go Fish by turning one card over at a time and trying to match the sight word. Make sure your child reads the word aloud as well as matching them by sight.

Make flashcards

Create flashcards and test your child on them. Make it a game by using a timer and moving on to a new card if your child gets frustrated. Repeat the same set of words to give your child confidence through achievement before moving on o a new set.

Источник: https://www.yahoo.com/now/40-first-grade-sight-words-204318159.html

Why?

The most important aspect of teaching sight words is teaching kids WHY they must memorize these whole words.Sight words have an important job because without them a lot of books and writing would not make sense. We’re learning them so we can enjoy a good story! As much as possible, point out sight words when you see them so your child cansee their role in stories.

Start easy

Focus on only one or two words for a week. Anymore than this before your child is ready will overwhelm and frustrate them. Remind them that a lot of times sight words don’t follow the spelling and sound rules, they can be tricky!

Paper Color Words

Once you’ve chosen a few words, write them clearly, in large, thick lowercase letters on a piece of paper or notecard. Write only one word per piece of paper or notecard. Have your child color the paper to give it a blue background or use color paper. Using any color will help the word stand out visually and in your child’s memory. You can use these cards like flash cards and review the words each day.

Word Boxing

Another technique to help student remember words it to “box” the letters. After you have written a sight word on a piece of paper, carefully draw a box around each letter. These boxes will help children visualize the words in their mind so they can retain them.

CLICK TO VIEW EXAMPLE OF WORD BOXING

Trace It and Tap It!

Try this quick 2 minute technique to help your child remember any sight word they have!

  1. Write a sight word on a note card or flash card in clear lowercase letter handwriting. Tell your child what the word is, then have them repeat it back to you.
  2. Have your child trace each letter on the flashcard using the back of a pen or pencil, say the name of each letter as they trace it. Then say the whole word while underlining it. Do this 2 more times.
  3. Now, trace the word on the table using their finger. Say each letter as you trace it then say the whole word while underlining it. Do this 2 times. Have them try to trace it from memory on their last try.
  4. Next, using the hand they write with, tap each letter of the word down their opposite arm. For example: how, “h” tap the shoulder, “o” tap the elbow, and “w” tap the wrist.
  5. Finally, have your child write the word in a notebook.
  6. Your child has mastered this new word when they can show you that they can read the word at least 5 times on their own, while its in the context of a book.

Add a Picture!

For many kids, it’s easier to visualize a picture with a word. If you’re writing sight words on note cards or pieces of paper, add a small picture or detail that might help them remember it. For example, for the word “my”, you could draw a small girl hugging the letter “y” to show her saying “my!” For the word “it”, you could draw a small creature that looks like a thing or an “it”. For the word “in”, you could draw the word “in” inside of a bubble.

Act it Out

All children benefit from acting out words. Bring a new word to life by creating a movement or gesture to help them build an association to the word. For example, for the word “my”, kids can wrap their arms around themselves and say “my” while looking at the word. For “you” they can point both their hands at you while repeating the word “you” they read from the card.

Tell Me a Sentence

Sight words are meaningless until we know how to use these words in our own conversations. Have your child tell you an original sentence using their new word. This can be challenging, so be ready to slow down with your child as they try to use their new word in a sentence and give lots of high fives when they can use it correctly.

Sight word: live

“We live in North Carolina, but my grandma lives in Georgia.”

Make Wormy Words

Using brightly colored yarn, cut out short (about 3 inches), medium (about 6 inches) and long (about 10 inches) pieces. Lay a blanket or bath  towel flat on the floor. Have your child form the sight words they are learning on the cloth using the pieces of yarn. This approach helps commit the word to their long-term memory.

Sight Word Ninja

Tell your child that sight words appear silently in the world around us. Every time your child spots a sight word out in the world of words, such as on coupon, in a story, or on a piece of mail, they should point it out and celebrate! The purpose of this activity is for students to get excited about recognizing words and to get a boost of confidence from knowing how to read them.

Источник: https://www.homereadinghelper.org/1st-grade-reading-skills-sight-words/

First Grade Sight Words Flash Cards

  • Curated 1st grade sight words flash cards from the Dolch and Fry lists to help prepare students for successful learning
  • Educational sight words for first grade readers ages 6-7
  • 100+ sight words per pack that cover up to 75% of the words found in 1st grade books
  • 6 teaching techniques and 6 fun educational games to learn sight words
  • Learning to read made easy with first grade flash cards

Think Tank Scholar Sight Words Flashcards help children in 1st grade to learn and practice reading the most common words found in first grade books.
Help your first grader build their vocabulary and greatly increase their level A reading skills by memorizing simple letter-to- sound high-frequency words that do not necessarily follow phonics rules.


Learning to recognize these words without decoding them increases a child’s reading speed accuracy, fluency, and comprehension. In addition, 6 teaching techniques and 6 sight word 1st grade games are included to help your children practice spelling and sentence structure.


Our cards are designed to make learning fun for young learners with a non-distracting design and large bold print that helps students automatically recognize words. The flash cards are made from high quality card stock with a smooth laminated coating and rounded edges for easy sorting and handling.
With over 100 words in the 1st grade flash cards pack you can teach your child words to master the reading skills needed for 1st grade and beyond.

The 6 fun sight word games include:

  • Complete the Sentence
  • Create a Sentence
  • Interactive Sentence
  • Slapjack
  • Search the Deck
  • Word Hunt

These Cards Meet the Following Common Core Standards:

  • ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2d
  • ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3c
  • ELA-Literacy.RF.1.2.B
  • ELA-Literacy.RF.1.3.F
  • ELA-Literacy.RF.2.3.E
  • ELA-Literacy.RF.2.3.F
Источник: https://www.thinktankscholar.com/products/first-grade-sight-word-flash-cards

Posted in 1st

Comments

  1. Sharad m nagarkar maharastra palgHar jlla nalasopara 10 vi pass phone nomber 9220289723 obc cast handicraft 46 /please coll karo

  2. I live in Mn childcare is what rent is. For one child. So this dumb NY judgement is invalid. As it said all states are above average

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *